Special Issue "Numerical Modelling of Circulation and Biogeochemistry of Esturine-Coastal Continuums"

A special issue of Geosciences (ISSN 2076-3263). This special issue belongs to the section "Geochemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Nuno Vaz
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CESAM, Physics Department, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: Estuarine and Coastal Physical Oceanography; stratification/mixing; Estuarine biogeochemistry; hydrodynamic and biogeochemical modelling
Dr. Marcos D. Mateus
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
MARETEC - Marine, Environment and Technology Centre, Instituto Superior Técnico, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Rovisco Pais, 1049-001 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: ocean biogeochestry; ocean modeling; water quality modeling; water resources; water management; coastal and estuarine processes
Prof. Dr. João Miguel Dias
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Physics Department, CESAM, University of Aveiro, Campus Universitário de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro, Portugal
Interests: estuarine oceanography; sea level rise; climate change; coastal flooding; tidal processes; physical-biogeochemical interactions; numerical modelling
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The estuary–coastal continuum is a common feature along the continental margin that is exposed to pressures and hazards from both land and sea. Consequently, these systems rank among the most transformed and imperilled social-ecological systems on earth. Changes in tidal propagation, freshwater discharge, and meteorological forcing impact the physical and biological nature of these ecosystems, making the knowledge of estuarine dynamics and biogeochemical variability vital for the management and preservation of the coastal continuum. Numerical modelling and satellite imagery have emerged over the past several decades as accepted tools in estuarine coastal research. In this framework, circulation and biogeochemical models and state-of-the art satellite data (MODIS, Sentinel, or Landsat) are among the most used tools for estuary–coastal analysis due to their ability to reproduce different temporal and spatial scales.
This Special Issue contributes to the study of physical and biogeochemical variability along the estuary–coast continuum, and should bring new insights and approaches to the management of such systems, as well as to dealing with the associated risks and uncertainties. For that, this Special Issue intends to bring together the scientific community, merging the contributions from several disciplines of estuarine and coastal science (numerical modellers, physical oceanographers, marine biologists, engineers, etc.).
We invite contributions focusing on:

- State-of-the-art circulation and biogeochemical models for the estuary–coastal continuum

- Dynamics and variability at the estuary–coastal continuum

- Satellite data studies in estuaries and coastal systems

- Case studies and scenario analyses (natural and human)

The following contributions are welcomed: research papers, review articles, and case studies, all addressing coastal systems and the issues related to their dynamics, including natural and human changes.

Dr. Nuno Vaz
Dr. Marcos Mateus
Prof. Dr. João Miguel Dias
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Geosciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • physical and biological processes
  • numerical and risk assessment
  • hydro-biogeochemical models
  • estuary–coastal continuums
  • satellite data

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Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessFeature PaperEditor’s ChoiceArticle
Improvement of an Operational Forecasting System for Extreme Tidal Events in Santos Estuary (Brazil)
Geosciences 2019, 9(12), 511; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9120511 - 10 Dec 2019
Viewed by 983
Abstract
Forecasting estuarine circulation is a hot topic, especially in densely populated regions, like Santos (Brazil). This paper aims to improve a water-level forecasting system for the Santos estuary, particularly the physical forcing determining the residual tide, which in extreme cases increase the predicting [...] Read more.
Forecasting estuarine circulation is a hot topic, especially in densely populated regions, like Santos (Brazil). This paper aims to improve a water-level forecasting system for the Santos estuary, particularly the physical forcing determining the residual tide, which in extreme cases increase the predicting errors. The MOHID hydrodynamic model was implemented with a nested downscaling approach. All automatic procedures to provide a high-resolution real-time forecast system are managed by the AQUASAFE software. Water-level observation and prediction datasets (2016–2017) of five tide gauges in the Santos channel were analyzed, resulting in distinct model configurations, aiming to minimize forecasting inaccuracies. Current MOHID open boundary reference solutions were modified: the astronomical solution was updated from FES2012 to FES2014 whereas the meteorological component (Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service (CMEMS) global solution) time resolution was altered from daily to hourly data. Furthermore, the correlation between significant wave height with positive residual tide events was identified. The model validation presented a minimum Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) of 12.5 cm. Despite FES2014 solution improvements at the bay entrance, errors increase in inner stations were maintained, portraying the need for better bathymetric data. The use of a CMEMS hourly resolution decreased the meteorological tide errors. A linear regression method was developed to correct the residual tide through post-processing, under specific wave height conditions. Overall, the newest implementation increased the water-level forecast accuracy, particularly under extreme events. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Saltwater Intrusion in the Upper Tagus Estuary during Droughts
Geosciences 2019, 9(9), 400; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences9090400 - 14 Sep 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1065
Abstract
Droughts reduce freshwater availability and have negative environmental, economic, and social impacts. In estuaries, the dynamics between the saltwater and the freshwater can be affected during droughts, which can impact several natural resources and economic sectors negatively. The Tagus estuary is one of [...] Read more.
Droughts reduce freshwater availability and have negative environmental, economic, and social impacts. In estuaries, the dynamics between the saltwater and the freshwater can be affected during droughts, which can impact several natural resources and economic sectors negatively. The Tagus estuary is one of the largest estuaries in Europe and supports diverse uses and activities that can be affected by the saltwater intrusion (e.g., agriculture). This study assesses the saltwater intrusion in the upper reaches of the Tagus estuary using a process-based model to explore different scenarios of freshwater discharge and sea level rise. For the river discharge and mean sea level rise scenarios analyzed, salinity can reach concentrations that are inadequate for irrigation when the mean Tagus river discharge is similar or lower than the ones observed during recent droughts (22–44 m3/s). Lower river discharges aggravate the consequences. Results also show that the salinity increases with the duration of the droughts. In contrast, the impact of a moderate sea level rise on salinity intrusion is modest when compared with the impact of low river discharges. These findings contribute to support the management of the agricultural activities in the upper Tagus estuary and the water resources in the Tagus river basin. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
The Tagus Estuary as a Numerical Modeling Test Bed: A Review
Geosciences 2020, 10(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/geosciences10010004 - 20 Dec 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 694
Abstract
The Tagus Estuary is the largest estuarine system in the Iberian Peninsula. Located in a heavily populated metropolitan area (Lisbon), the estuary-coastal continuum is subject to significant natural variability (e.g., tidal variations, winds, river inflow, etc.) and human pressures (e.g., sewage outflow, infrastructures, [...] Read more.
The Tagus Estuary is the largest estuarine system in the Iberian Peninsula. Located in a heavily populated metropolitan area (Lisbon), the estuary-coastal continuum is subject to significant natural variability (e.g., tidal variations, winds, river inflow, etc.) and human pressures (e.g., sewage outflow, infrastructures, coastal reclamation, dredging, etc.). Since the 1980s, the estuary has been a natural laboratory for a great number of multidisciplinary studies, but also a numerical laboratory to test models and to develop new ideas and numerical methodologies. Hydrodynamic and biogeochemical models have been used ever since to ascertain the main spatial and temporal features of the Tagus system, connecting its dynamic to its biogeochemical cycles, providing numerical tools used to increase knowledge and to manage the estuary and nearby coastal waters. The main objective of this paper is to present a synopsis of the scientific output related to numerical studies in the Tagus system, by reviewing more than fifty papers published over the past four decades. Our work provides a historical background and description of the numerical models implemented to address estuarine hydrodynamics, nutrient uptake, primary production, light availability, seasonal and annual cycles and the link between physical, biological and chemical estuarine oceanography. Full article
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