Special Issue "Cloud-Native Applications and Services"

A special issue of Future Internet (ISSN 1999-5903). This special issue belongs to the section "Network Virtualization and Edge/Fog Computing".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Nane Kratzke
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Lübeck University of Applied Sciences, 23562 Lübeck, Germany
Interests: cloud computing; service computing; microservices; serverless architectures; web-scale information systems; data science; machine learning; volunteer computing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Even small companies can generate enormous economic growth and business value by providing cloud-based services or applications. Instagram, Uber, AirBnB, DropBox, WhatsApp, NetFlix, Zoom, and many more astonishing small companies all had very modest headcounts in their founding days. However, these "cloud-native" enterprises have all had a remarkable economic and social impact just a few years later. What is more, these companies changed the style of how large-scale applications are being built today. What these companies have in common is their cloud-first approach. They  intentionally make use of cloud resources. These companies are capable of scaling their services on a global scale, as quickly as is needed. In times of world-wide COVID19 shutdowns, these "cloud-native" companies have emerged as an essential and unaware backbone that can keep even large economies (at least partly) operating. Services by these cloud-native companies enable over-night established remote working opportunities for company staff that found themselves suddenly working in home offices. These services enable ad-hoc remote teaching opportunities for teachers and students at schools and universities. Currently, these "cloud-native" services are some of the working things that "keep our heads above water".

This Special Issue aims to collect (and to esteem in the light of the current COVID19 shutdowns) the most recent innovations in cloud-native software and system engineering practices. We want to provide a broad and well-grounded picture what the more and more frequently used term "cloud-native" is exactly about, and what its implications are or could be. We strive to gather research from different disciplines and methodological backgrounds to discuss new ideas, research questions, recent results, and future challenges in this emerging area of research. 

Potential topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Cloud-native related use cases, experiences, and evaluations
  • Cloud-native related software and system engineering methodologies (e.g., domain-driven design, microservices, serverless architectures, DevOps, and more)
  • Cloud-native related technologies (e.g., containers, container orchestration, infrastructure as code, service meshes, observability solutions, auto-scaling solutions, and more)
  • Cloud-native related solution proposal studies
  • Cloud-native related systematic mapping studies and systematic literature reviews

Prof. Dr. Nane Kratzke
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Future Internet is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cloud computing
  • microservices
  • serverless
  • cloud-native
  • application
  • service
  • CNA
  • CNS
  • service computing

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Open AccessPerspective
Volunteer Down: How COVID-19 Created the Largest Idling Supercomputer on Earth
Future Internet 2020, 12(6), 98; https://doi.org/10.3390/fi12060098 - 06 Jun 2020
Abstract
From close to scratch, the COVID-19 pandemic created the largest volunteer supercomputer on earth. Sadly, processing resources assigned to the corresponding [email protected] project cannot be shared with other volunteer computing projects efficiently. Consequently, the largest supercomputer had significant idle times. This perspective paper [...] Read more.
From close to scratch, the COVID-19 pandemic created the largest volunteer supercomputer on earth. Sadly, processing resources assigned to the corresponding [email protected] project cannot be shared with other volunteer computing projects efficiently. Consequently, the largest supercomputer had significant idle times. This perspective paper investigates how the resource sharing of future volunteer computing projects could be improved. Notably, efficient resource sharing has been optimized throughout the last ten years in cloud computing. Therefore, this perspective paper reviews the current state of volunteer and cloud computing to analyze what both domains could learn from each other. It turns out that the disclosed resource sharing shortcomings of volunteer computing could be addressed by technologies that have been invented, optimized, and adapted for entirely different purposes by cloud-native companies like Uber, Airbnb, Google, or Facebook. Promising technologies might be containers, serverless architectures, image registries, distributed service registries, and all have one thing in common: They already exist and are all tried and tested in large web-scale deployments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cloud-Native Applications and Services)
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