Special Issue "Wine: Consumers’ Perceptions, Preferences and Behaviour"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Sensory and Consumer Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Susan Bastian
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, Waite Research Institute, The University of Adelaide (UA), PMB 1, Glen Osmond, South Australia 5064, Australia
Interests: grape composition, wine quality and style; wine terroir and authenticity; inter-individual variation in taste and texture perception; wine astringency and body; vegetable fining agents; oral microbiome; consumption context; virtual and augmented reality; consumer emotions; wine and food pairing; new wine product development; wine tourism
Dr. Lukas Danner
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Agriculture, Food and Wine, Waite Research Institute, The University of Adelaide (UA), PMB 1, Glen Osmond, South Australia 5064, Australia
Interests: all aspects associated with food choice; effects of consumption context; sensory method development and validation; rapid sensory methods; emotions; visual attention; cross-cultural consumer research

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Currently, the global wine industry is transitioning from being producer-driven to becoming more consumer-centric. This Special Issue aims to present high-quality original research contributions, short communications and reviews on wine consumers’ wine perception, preference and behaviour, including innovations in research methodologies.

It will cover all aspects of wine consumer research and potentially encompass topics such as sensory and molecular drivers of preference; contextual influences; wine consumer segmentation; and cross-cultural and inter-individual differences.

Research examining consumer acceptance of new wine products/styles plus topical issues, e.g., consumer attitudes toward wine provenance, authenticity, sustainability, ethical wine production and healthy lifestyles, are of interest.

Papers investigating digital technologies to collect and analyse wine consumer data will also be encouraged.

Dr. Susan Bastian
Dr. Lukas Danner
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Wine quality and style
  • Wine terroir and authenticity
  • Taste and texture perception
  • Consumer emotions
  • Wine and food pairing
  • Consumer research

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Historical Wines of Portugal: The Classification, Consumer Associations and Marketing Implications
Foods 2021, 10(5), 979; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10050979 - 29 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 636
Abstract
Geographical origin, use of traditional varieties and ancestral viticulture/oenology practices characterize wines classified as Historical Wines of Portugal (HWP). This study identifies the authenticity attributes consumers associate with this classification and assesses the relative strength of associations. A review of brand authenticity research [...] Read more.
Geographical origin, use of traditional varieties and ancestral viticulture/oenology practices characterize wines classified as Historical Wines of Portugal (HWP). This study identifies the authenticity attributes consumers associate with this classification and assesses the relative strength of associations. A review of brand authenticity research and interviews with Portuguese wine producers (n = 3) and consumers (n = 12) were conducted to identify HWP classification attributes. Strength of attribute association was subsequently evaluated in an online questionnaire with a convenience sample of Portuguese wine consumers (n = 641), which included a measure of general wine knowledge and questions about the adequacy of different contexts for HWP purchase and consumption. Wine knowledge markedly affected the nature and strength of consumer associations. Compared to Aspirational Explorers, wine connoisseurs emerged as Heritage Gatekeepers, associating origin, cultural heritage, quality, production and at-home consumption more strongly with HWP, and tradition, wine age and out-of-home consumption less strongly. Market recognition of HWP as a novel and distinctive table wine classification, with well-defined and unique attributes, is thus likely to depend on consumers’ general wine knowledge. Related promotional activities targeting wine novices should first focus on educating them on HWP classification, whereas those directed at savvier consumers should emphasize wine authenticity cues instead. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wine: Consumers’ Perceptions, Preferences and Behaviour)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Consumer Perception of Red Wine by the Degree of Familiarity Using Consumer-Based Methodology
Foods 2021, 10(4), 749; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10040749 - 01 Apr 2021
Viewed by 610
Abstract
Capturing and understanding consumers’ perceptions is not a simple quest, particularly for wine, which is one of the most complex beverages. In contrast to the increasing amount of wine import and consumption, studies on how Korean consumers perceive wine characteristics are limited. In [...] Read more.
Capturing and understanding consumers’ perceptions is not a simple quest, particularly for wine, which is one of the most complex beverages. In contrast to the increasing amount of wine import and consumption, studies on how Korean consumers perceive wine characteristics are limited. In this study, two different consumer-based questionnaires, check-all-that-apply (CATA) and rating, were used to compare the discrimination ability of samples and attributes. Consumer data were analyzed and compared to investigate whether the difference in the degree of familiarity with consumption frequency affects wine perception and preference. Consumers discriminated samples and attributes by sample using both scales, CATA and rating. It was confirmed that the CATA citation frequency reflected the rated intensity of the attributes in this study. Consumers who checked or did not check the CATA response rated the intensity of attributes differently. Different consumer subgroups based on familiarity also discriminated the samples effectively. However, users had a higher configuration similarity between the two questionnaires than non-users. Furthermore, the preference for wine might be affected by the degree of familiarity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wine: Consumers’ Perceptions, Preferences and Behaviour)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Investigating Australian Consumers’ Perceptions of and Preferences for Different Styles of Sparkling Wine Using the Fine Wine Instrument
Foods 2021, 10(3), 488; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10030488 - 24 Feb 2021
Viewed by 777
Abstract
This study investigated consumer preferences for different styles of sparkling wine and the influence of wine style and occasion on sparkling wine purchasing and consumption behavior. Australian consumers (n = 203) completed an online survey and blind tasting of representative styles of [...] Read more.
This study investigated consumer preferences for different styles of sparkling wine and the influence of wine style and occasion on sparkling wine purchasing and consumption behavior. Australian consumers (n = 203) completed an online survey and blind tasting of representative styles of commercial sparkling wines, including Champagne. Wine sensory profiles were determined by descriptive analysis using a trained panel (n = 12) and consumers were segmented into ‘No Frills’, ‘Aspirant’ and ‘Enthusiast’ clusters using the Fine Wine Instrument. Consumer perceptions, preferences and liking were measured using 9-point hedonic scales and compared via statistical analysis. Consumers anticipated liking Champagne and sparkling white wine the most, and Moscato and Prosecco the least, but on tasting, could only readily identify the Moscato and sparkling red wines, as the most contrasting wine styles. As such, liking scores for the Champagne and sparkling white wine were significantly lower based on tasting (median scores were 6.0, compared with 9.0 and 8.0 for survey responses, respectively). Consumers’ preconceived expectations of different sparkling wine styles clearly influenced purchasing and consumption behavior. Aspirants and Enthusiasts were more likely to spend more per bottle for Champagne and sparkling white wine, and consumption of these sparkling wines was most frequently associated with celebratory occasions, such as anniversaries, birthdays, Christmas, New Year and weddings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wine: Consumers’ Perceptions, Preferences and Behaviour)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Consumption Context Effects on Fine Wine Consumer Segments’ Liking and Emotions
Foods 2020, 9(12), 1798; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9121798 - 03 Dec 2020
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 914
Abstract
Wine consumer lifestyle segmentation has been widely studied; however, most studies have solely utilised online surveys. This work investigated the impact of context on wine consumer segments’ liking and emotions while consuming wines in different environments. Two studies were conducted with regular wine [...] Read more.
Wine consumer lifestyle segmentation has been widely studied; however, most studies have solely utilised online surveys. This work investigated the impact of context on wine consumer segments’ liking and emotions while consuming wines in different environments. Two studies were conducted with regular wine consumers segmented based on their fine wine behaviour using the Fine Wine Instrument. Study 1 (n = 122) investigated the effects of wine variety and product information, and Study 2 (n = 346) the effects of wine quality and consumption context, on hedonic and emotional responses of the segments. Within both studies, three segments were identified and named: Wine Enthusiasts, Aspirants and No Frills. The Wine Enthusiast segment generally liked the wines more and perceived more intense positive emotions when consuming wine compared to the No Frills segment, with the Aspirant’s likes and emotion intensities ranging in between. Wine Enthusiasts were more discriminative of their preferred wines and reported stronger positive emotions when tasting higher quality (Study 1) and more complex (Study 2) wines. The consistent results across the two studies showed for the first time that consumer segments, based on lifestyle segmentation, differ in their hedonic and emotional responses towards wine when actually tasting wines, demonstrating that the Fine Wine Instrument has practical implications and can identify wine consumers displaying different wine consumption behaviours. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wine: Consumers’ Perceptions, Preferences and Behaviour)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop