Special Issue "Food Safety and Shelf-Life Extension of Food Products"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Quality and Safety".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 September 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Ignacio Álvarez
Website
Guest Editor
Food Technology, Facultad de Veterinaria, Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón-IA2, (Universidad de Zaragoza-CITA), Zaragoza, Spain
Interests: thermal and nonthermal technologies; food safety and stability; predictive microbiology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Pilar Mañas
Website
Guest Editor
Associate Professor – University of Zaragoza
Interests: thermal and nonthermal technologies; physiology of foodborne pathogens; food safety; food fermentations
Dr. Guillermo Cebrián
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Food Technology, Facultad de Veterinaria, Instituto Agroalimentario de Aragón-IA2, (Universidad de Zaragoza-CITA), Zaragoza, Spain
Interests: thermal and nonthermal processing; physiology of foodborne pathogens; food safety; predictive microbiology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The food industry is currently faced with challenges such as market globalization, transformations in food purchasing habits, and increasing consumer demands. Consumers now tend to desire products that are more convenient: They prefer foodstuffs with an extended shelf-life, but which, at the same time, are less processed and offer a greater sensation of freshness.

To address this problem, different approaches are being studied. The ones which are probably attracting the most attention include: (1) The development of new and/or optimized preservation processes—including combined processes—designed to inactivate or limit bacterial growth without negatively affecting food quality; and (2) the elaboration of tools capable of predicting the shelf-life and safety of food products, thereby enabling companies to optimize their processes and resources to make the best decisions.

The aim of this Special Issue of Foods is to present the leading edge of both approaches. Original research and review papers dealing with the application of traditional and novel technologies for improving food safety and/or extending shelf-life, and/or with the evaluation and prediction of food safety and shelf-life, are all welcome for inclusion in this Special Issue.

Dr. Ignacio Álvarez
Dr. Pilar Mañas
Dr. Guillermo Cebrián
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Food safety
  • Food quality
  • Foodborne pathogens
  • Food spoilage
  • Thermal processing
  • Nonthermal technologies
  • Combined processes
  • Predictive microbiology
  • Challenge test
  • Risk assessment

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Towards the Next-Generation Disinfectant: Composition, Storability and Preservation Potential of Plasma Activated Water on Baby Spinach Leaves
Foods 2019, 8(12), 692; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8120692 - 17 Dec 2019
Cited by 3
Abstract
Plasma activated water (PAW) has rapidly emerged as a promising alternative to traditional sanitizers applied in the fresh produce industry. In the present study, PAW chemistry and storage stability were assessed as a function of plasma operating conditions. Increasing plasma exposure time (5, [...] Read more.
Plasma activated water (PAW) has rapidly emerged as a promising alternative to traditional sanitizers applied in the fresh produce industry. In the present study, PAW chemistry and storage stability were assessed as a function of plasma operating conditions. Increasing plasma exposure time (5, 12.5, 20 min) and power (16, 26, 36 W) led to a significant drop in pH (2.4) and higher nitrates and nitrites levels (320 and 7.2 mg/L, respectively) in the PAW. Non-detectable hydrogen peroxide concentration, irrespective of the treatment conditions, was attributed to its instability in acidic environments and the remote PAW generation mode. pH, nitrates and nitrites levels in the PAW remained unaffected after two weeks at 4 °C. The potential of PAW for microbial inactivation and quality retention was demonstrated on baby spinach leaves. Rinsing steps influenced colour development during chilled storage to a greater extent than PAW treatment itself. About 1 log reduction in total bacterial counts (5 log CFU/g) was achieved through PAW rinsing, with no variability after eight days at 4 °C (typical shelf-life at retailers). Moreover, microbial levels on PAW-treated samples after storage were significantly lower than those on control samples, thus contributing to extended product shelf-life and reduced food waste generation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Safety and Shelf-Life Extension of Food Products)
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Open AccessArticle
Utilizing Impedance for Quality Assessment of European Squid (Loligo Vulgaris) during Chilled Storage
Foods 2019, 8(12), 624; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8120624 - 29 Nov 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
This study evaluates the quality of chilled squid Loligo vulgaris by non-destructive measurements of bioelectrical impedance from the first post-mortem day under controlled conditions. Squid samples were stored at 4.5 °C and 55% of relative humidity for 11 days. Impedance magnitude (|Z|) and [...] Read more.
This study evaluates the quality of chilled squid Loligo vulgaris by non-destructive measurements of bioelectrical impedance from the first post-mortem day under controlled conditions. Squid samples were stored at 4.5 °C and 55% of relative humidity for 11 days. Impedance magnitude (|Z|) and phase (φ) at 200 frequencies (100Hz to 100MHz) were measured using an Agilent 4294A Precision Impedance Analyzer with needle-type multi-electrode array on days 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, 9, 10, and 11 of storage. The changes in color, sensory properties, total volatile nitrogen, pH, and water holding capacity were also determined. The obtained results indicated that the samples could be classified into five to six distinctive groups by measuring the electrical parameters at frequencies close to 5MHz. In general, φ is less dependent on temperature and measurement setup than |Z|, while records at 5MHz correlate well with the days of storage (R2 = 0.968). The data imply that it is only possible to estimate the length of storage for the samples with measurements of phase angle, which can be useful for the development of new analytical instruments. Biosensors have a practical industrial application, as it is demonstrated that bioelectrical impedance data correlates well with the days of chilled storage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Safety and Shelf-Life Extension of Food Products)
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Open AccessArticle
Characterization of the Spoilage Microbiota of Hake Fillets Packaged Under a Modified Atmosphere (MAP) Rich in CO2 (50% CO2/50% N2) and Stored at Different Temperatures
Foods 2019, 8(10), 489; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8100489 - 13 Oct 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The aim of this study was to characterize the spoilage microbiota of hake fillets stored under modified atmospheres (MAP) (50% CO2/50% N2) at different temperatures using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing and to compare the results with those obtained [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to characterize the spoilage microbiota of hake fillets stored under modified atmospheres (MAP) (50% CO2/50% N2) at different temperatures using high-throughput 16S rRNA gene sequencing and to compare the results with those obtained using traditional microbiology techniques. The results obtained indicate that, as expected, higher storage temperatures lead to shorter shelf-lives (the time of sensory rejection by panelists). Thus, the shelf-life decreased from six days to two days for Batch A when the storage temperature increased from 1 to 7 °C, and from five to two days—when the same increase in storage temperature was compared—for Batch B. In all cases, the trimethylamine (TMA) levels measured at the time of sensory rejection of hake fillets exceeded the recommended threshold of 5 mg/100 g. Photobacterium and Psychrobacter were the most abundant genera at the time of spoilage in all but one of the samples analyzed: Thus, Photobacterium represented between 19% and 46%, and Psychrobacter between 27% and 38% of the total microbiota. They were followed by Moritella, Carnobacterium, Shewanella, and Vibrio, whose relative order varied depending on the sample/batch analyzed. These results highlight the relevance of Photobacterium as a spoiler of hake stored in atmospheres rich in CO2. Further research will be required to elucidate if other microorganisms, such as Psychrobacter, Moritella, or Carnobacterium, also contribute to spoilage of hake when stored under MAP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Safety and Shelf-Life Extension of Food Products)
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Open AccessArticle
Shelf Life Extension and Improvement of the Nutritional Value of Fish Fillets through Osmotic Treatment Based on the Sustainable Use of Rosa damascena Distillation By-Products
Foods 2019, 8(9), 421; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8090421 - 18 Sep 2019
Abstract
The objective of this work is the comparative study of different osmotic treatments at 37 °C on the quality and shelf life of chilled sea bass fillets. Fish fillets were treated using osmotic solutions consisting of oligofructose (40%–50%–60%) and 5% NaCl with (BP/OT) [...] Read more.
The objective of this work is the comparative study of different osmotic treatments at 37 °C on the quality and shelf life of chilled sea bass fillets. Fish fillets were treated using osmotic solutions consisting of oligofructose (40%–50%–60%) and 5% NaCl with (BP/OT) and without (OT) former antioxidant enrichment by using Rosa damascena distillation by-products. Water activity decreased to approximately 0.95 after 330 minutes of osmotic treatment. Untreated and osmotically treated fish fillets (BP/OT) and (OT) were subsequently stored at 5 °C and their quality was evaluated based on microbial growth and lipid oxidation. Osmotic treatment extended significantly the shelf life of fish in terms of microbial growth; however, it also accelerated its lipid oxidation. The impregnation of Rosa damascena phenolics not only counterbalanced this negative effect, but led to a more than four-fold increase of the shelf life of sea bass, as compared to the untreated samples. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Safety and Shelf-Life Extension of Food Products)
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