Special Issue "Regulation of Food Fermentations by Bacteria, Yeasts and Filamentous Fungi"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 May 2023 | Viewed by 7222

Special Issue Editors

Dr. João Miguel F. Rocha
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory for Process Engineering, Environment, Biotechnology and Energy (LEPABE), Department of Chemical Engineering (DEQ), Faculty of Engineering, University of Porto (FEUP), Porto, Portugal
Interests: food microbiota; chromatography and mass spectrometry; separation processes; valorization of agri-good by-products; fermentation processes and microbial starter cultures; sourdough and breadmaking
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Fatih Ozogul
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Seafood Processing Technology, Faculty of Fisheries, Cukurova University, 01330 Balcali, Adana, Turkey
Interests: food technology & microbiology; microbial biotechnology; lactic acid bacteria; probiotics; biogenic amines; histamine; food-borne pathogens; food spoilage bacteria; modified atmosphere & vacuum packaging; food compounds analysis using HPLC, GC, GS-MS; Spectrophotometer; Texture analyses
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Elena Bartkiene
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Department of Food Safety and Quality, Faculty of Animal Sciences, Institute of Animal Rearing Technologies, University of Health Sciences, Tilzes str. 18, LT-47181 Kaunas, Lithuania
Interests: food chemical and biosafety; food technologies development; by-products valorisation, sustainable technologies, functional food, nutraceuticals
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This is a comprehensive journal Special Issue covering all scientific aspects of food fermentation by bacteria, yeasts and filamentous fungi (moulds), as well as the by-products of fermentation processes across the whole production line. Topics within the scope of this Special Issue include:

  • Prospection of microbial species and strains in food matrixes for fermentation processes;
  • Innovative fermentation and technological developments towards nutritional and health attributes of food;
  • Bacterial, yeast and mould fermentations as cell factories to design breakthrough metabolites and novel derived fermented products, with potential application in the food, feed, nutraceutical, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries;
  • Fermentation as a tool to use agricultural and industrial by-products in a circular economy and environmentally friendly approach;
  • Fermentation as an effective way to foster food safety and prevent risks of food poisoning by foodborne pathogens;
  • Development and optimization of fermentation processes by monitoring fermentation parameters and by designing bioengineered microorganisms with beneficial encrypted genotypic and phenotypic traits;
  • Elucidation of fermentation dynamics and relationship with biotic and abiotic key factors, as well as the elucidation and regulation of the microbial metabolic pathways and driving forces to attain optimal growth and fermentation conditions; and
  • Interactions between microorganisms in fermentation processes and their potential impact on human health.

Dr. João Miguel F. Rocha
Prof. Dr. Fatih Ozogul
Prof. Dr. Elena Bartkiene
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fermentation
  • yeasts
  • bacteria
  • monitoring and regulation
  • food safety and hygiene
  • industrial applications
  • nutrition
  • healthy food

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Article
Analysis of Microbial Community Diversity on the Epidermis of Wine Grapes in Manasi’s Vineyard, Xinjiang
Foods 2022, 11(20), 3174; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11203174 - 12 Oct 2022
Viewed by 493
Abstract
Epiphytic microbial communities significantly impact the health and quality of grape berries. This study utilized high-performance liquid chromatography and high-throughput sequencing to explore the epiphytic microbial diversity and physicochemical indicators in nine different wine grape varieties. In total, 1,056,651 high-quality bacterial 16S rDNA [...] Read more.
Epiphytic microbial communities significantly impact the health and quality of grape berries. This study utilized high-performance liquid chromatography and high-throughput sequencing to explore the epiphytic microbial diversity and physicochemical indicators in nine different wine grape varieties. In total, 1,056,651 high-quality bacterial 16S rDNA sequences and 1,101,314 fungal ITS reads were used for taxonomic categorization. Among the bacteria, Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were the dominant phyla, and Massilia, Pantoea, Pseudomonas, Halomonas, Corynebacterium, Bacillus, Anaerococcus, and Acinetobacter were the dominant genera. Among the fungi, Ascomycota and Basidiomycota were the dominant phyla, and Alternaria, Filobasidium, Erysiphe, Naganishia, and Aureobasidium were the dominant genera. Notably, Matheran (MSL) and Riesling (RS) exhibited the highest microbial diversity among the nine grape varieties. Moreover, pronounced differences in epiphytic microorganisms in red and white grapes suggested that the grape variety significantly influences the structure of surface microbial communities. Understanding the composition of epiphytic microorganisms on the grape skin can provide a direct guide to winemaking. Full article
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Article
Effect of Different Yeast Strains on Biogenic Amines, Volatile Compounds and Sensory Profile of Beer
Foods 2022, 11(15), 2317; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11152317 - 03 Aug 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 584
Abstract
Nowadays, there are many sorts of beer, however, some of them, despite the good sensory and other quality indicators, could contain high concentrations of undesirable compounds, such biogenic amines (BA). The yeast strain (YS), used for fermentation, can cause desirable as well as [...] Read more.
Nowadays, there are many sorts of beer, however, some of them, despite the good sensory and other quality indicators, could contain high concentrations of undesirable compounds, such biogenic amines (BA). The yeast strain (YS), used for fermentation, can cause desirable as well as undesirable changes in beer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the contribution of different YS (A-Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. diastaticus, B-Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. bayanus, C-Brettanomyces claussenii) on the main quality parameters of beer. In addition, the BA concentration and the volatile compounds (VC, measured by gas chromatography–mass spectrometry) and their relation with beer overall acceptability (OA, evaluated by 20 trained judges) and emotions induced for consumers were analysed. The YS was a significant factor on alcohol formation in beer (p = 0.0001). The highest colour intensity was shown by C beer (10.2 EBC), and the latter beer showed the lowest OA. All of the beer samples induced the highest intensity of the emotion “neutral”, and the main VC of the beer were 3-methyl-1-butanol; L-α-terpineol; hexanoic acid 3-methylbutyl ester; and n-capric acid isobutyl ester. The highest total BAs content was found in beer fermented with C. Finally, all of the tested YS are suitable for beer production, however, taking into consideration the safety aspect of the beer, it should be mentioned that the highest concentration of BAs was found in beer fermented with C strain. Full article
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Article
Bioprocessing of Wheat and Amaranth Bran for the Reduction of Fructan Levels and Application in 3D-Printed Snacks
Foods 2022, 11(11), 1649; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11111649 - 02 Jun 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 867
Abstract
Bran can enrich snacks with dietary fibre but contains fructans that trigger symptoms in people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This study aimed to investigate the bioprocessing of wheat and amaranth bran for degrading fructans and its application (at 20% flour-based) in 3D-printed [...] Read more.
Bran can enrich snacks with dietary fibre but contains fructans that trigger symptoms in people with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This study aimed to investigate the bioprocessing of wheat and amaranth bran for degrading fructans and its application (at 20% flour-based) in 3D-printed snacks. Bran was bioprocessed with Saccharomyces cerevisiae alone or combined with inulinase, Kluyveromyces marxianus, Limosilactobacillus fermentum, or commercial starter LV1 for 24 h. Fructans, fructose, glucose, and mannitol in the bran were analysed enzymatically. Dough rheology, snack printing precision, shrinkage in baking, texture, colour, and sensory attributes were determined. The fructan content of wheat bran was 2.64% dry weight, and in amaranth bran, it was 0.96% dry weight. Bioprocessing reduced fructan content (up to 93%) depending on the bran type and bioprocessing agent, while fructose and mannitol remained below the cut-off value for IBS patients. Bran bioprocessing increased the complex viscosity and yield stress of dough (by up to 43 and 183%, respectively) in addition to printing precision (by up to 13%), while it lessened shrinkage in baking (by 20–69%) and the hardness of the snacks (by 20%). The intensity of snack sensory attributes depended on the bran type and bioprocessing agent, but the liking (“neither like nor dislike”) was similar between samples. In conclusion, snacks can be enriched with fibre while remaining low in fructans by applying bioprocessed wheat or amaranth bran and 3D printing. Full article
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Article
Evolution in Composition of Kombucha Consortia over Three Consecutive Years in Production Context
Foods 2022, 11(4), 614; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11040614 - 21 Feb 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 755
Abstract
Kombucha is a traditional drink obtained from sugared tea that is transformed by a community of yeasts and bacteria. Its production has become industrialized, and the study of the microbial community’s evolution is needed to improve control over the process. This study followed [...] Read more.
Kombucha is a traditional drink obtained from sugared tea that is transformed by a community of yeasts and bacteria. Its production has become industrialized, and the study of the microbial community’s evolution is needed to improve control over the process. This study followed the microbial composition of black and green kombucha tea over three consecutive years in a production facility using a culture-dependent method. Microorganisms were isolated and cultivated using selective agar media. The DNA of isolates was extracted, amplified using 26S and 16S PCR, and sequenced. Identities were obtained after a comparison to the NCBI database. Dekkera/Brettanomyces bruxellensis, Hanseniaspora valbyensis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were the major yeast species, and the major bacterial genera were Acetobacter and Liquorilactobacillus. Results highlight the persistence of yeast species such as B. bruxellensis detected in 2019. Some yeasts species appeared to be sensitive towards stressful events, such as a hot period in 2019. However, they were resilient and isolated again in 2021, as was the case for H. valbyensis. Dominance of B. bruxellensis was clear in green and black tea kombucha, but proportions in yeasts varied depending on tea type and phase (liquid or biofilm). Composition in acetic acid and lactic acid bacteria showed a higher variability than yeasts with many changes in species over time. Full article
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Review

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Review
Postbiotics: Current Trends in Food and Pharmaceutical Industry
Foods 2022, 11(19), 3094; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11193094 - 05 Oct 2022
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1782
Abstract
Postbiotics are non-viable bacterial products or metabolic byproducts produced by probiotic microorganisms that have biologic activity in the host. Postbiotics are functional bioactive compounds, generated in a matrix during anaerobic fermentation of organic nutrients like prebiotics, for the generation of energy in the [...] Read more.
Postbiotics are non-viable bacterial products or metabolic byproducts produced by probiotic microorganisms that have biologic activity in the host. Postbiotics are functional bioactive compounds, generated in a matrix during anaerobic fermentation of organic nutrients like prebiotics, for the generation of energy in the form of adenosine triphosphate. The byproducts of this metabolic sequence are called postbiotics, these are low molecular weight soluble compounds either secreted by live microflora or released after microbial cell lysis. A few examples of widely studied postbiotics are short-chain fatty acids, microbial cell fragments, extracellular polysaccharides, cell lysates, teichoic acid, vitamins, etc. Presently, prebiotics and probiotics are the products on the market; however, postbiotics are also gaining a great deal of attention. The numerous health advantages of postbiotic components may soon lead to an increase in consumer demand for postbiotic supplements. The most recent research aspects of postbiotics in the food and pharmaceutical industries are included in this review. The review encompasses a brief introduction, classification, production technologies, characterization, biological activities, and potential applications of postbiotics. Full article
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Review
Novel Candidate Microorganisms for Fermentation Technology: From Potential Benefits to Safety Issues
Foods 2022, 11(19), 3074; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11193074 - 04 Oct 2022
Viewed by 643
Abstract
Fermentation is one of the oldest known production processes and the most technologically valuable in terms of the food industry. In recent years, increasing nutrition and health awareness has also changed what is expected from fermentation technology, and the production of healthier foods [...] Read more.
Fermentation is one of the oldest known production processes and the most technologically valuable in terms of the food industry. In recent years, increasing nutrition and health awareness has also changed what is expected from fermentation technology, and the production of healthier foods has started to come a little more forward rather than increasing the shelf life and organoleptic properties of foods. Therefore, in addition to traditional microorganisms, a new generation of (novel) microorganisms has been discovered and research has shifted to this point. Novel microorganisms are known as either newly isolated genera and species from natural sources or bacterial strains derived from existing bacteria. Although novel microorganisms are mostly studied for their use in novel food production in terms of gut-microbiota modulation, recent innovative food research highlights their fermentative effects and usability, especially in food modifications. Herein, Clostridium butyricum, Bacteroides xylanisolvens, Akkermansia muciniphila, Mycobacterium setense manresensis, and Fructophilic lactic acid bacteria (FLAB) can play key roles in future candidate microorganisms for fermentation technology in foods. However, there is also some confusion about the safety issues related to the use of these novel microorganisms. This review paper focuses on certain novel candidate microorganisms for fermentation technology with a deep view of their functions, benefits, and safety issues. Full article
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Review
Bread Sourdough Lactic Acid Bacteria—Technological, Antimicrobial, Toxin-Degrading, Immune System-, and Faecal Microbiota-Modelling Biological Agents for the Preparation of Food, Nutraceuticals and Feed
Foods 2022, 11(3), 452; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11030452 - 03 Feb 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1226
Abstract
This review intends to highlight the fact that bread sourdough is a very promising source of technological, antimicrobial, toxin-degrading, immune system-, and faecal microbiota-modelling biological agents for the preparation of food, nutraceuticals, and feed, which has great potential at industrial biotechnology scale. There [...] Read more.
This review intends to highlight the fact that bread sourdough is a very promising source of technological, antimicrobial, toxin-degrading, immune system-, and faecal microbiota-modelling biological agents for the preparation of food, nutraceuticals, and feed, which has great potential at industrial biotechnology scale. There are many applications of sourdough lactic acid bacteria (LAB), which are the main microorganisms in spontaneous sourdough. In addition to their application as pure technological strains in the food and feed industries, taking into consideration the specific properties of these microorganisms (antimicrobial, antifungal, immuno-, and microbiota-modulating, etc.), they are used as valuable ingredients in higher-value food as well as nutraceutical formulations. Additionally, a very promising application of LAB is their use in combination with plant- and/or animal-based ingredients to increase the functional properties of the whole combination due to different mechanisms of action, as well as desirable symbiotic activity. In addition to traditional foods prepared using sourdough microorganisms (bread, biscuits, meat products, dairy, beverages, etc.), they could find application in the preparation of added-value ingredients for the food, nutraceutical, and feed industries. Finally, this mini-review gives a brief introduction to the possible applications of sourdough LAB in the food, feed, and nutraceutical industries. Full article
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