Special Issue "Microbial Spoilage of Beverages"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 December 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Giovanna Suzzi

Guest Editor
Faculty of Bioscience and Technology for Food, Agriculture and Environment, University of Teramo, Via R. Balzarini, 1-64100 Teramo, Italy
Interests: Saccharomyces cerevisiae; non-Saccharomyces; yeast physiology; yeast flocculation; biogenic amines; dairy products; meat products; food fermentation; aroma compounds; food safety
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Rosanna Tofalo
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Bioscience and Technology for Food, Agriculture and Environment, University of Teramo, Via R. Balzarini, 1-64100 Teramo, Italy
Interests: wine yeast; Saccharomyces cerevisiae; Kluyveromyces marxianus; non-Saccharomyces; yeast physiology; yeast flocculation; biofilm; biogenic amines
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Giorgia Perpetuini
Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Bioscience and Technology for Food, Agriculture and Environment, University of Teramo, Via R. Balzarini, 1-64100 Teramo, Italy
Interests: wine yeast; lactic acid bacteria; spoilage microbes; gene expression; molecular methods; adhesion properties; biofilm; sparkling wine; table olives; fermented food; biogenic amines
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, consumers have become more conscious about the role of fermented and non-fermented beverages in their diets. In fact, such beverages are no longer consumed only to provide refreshment and hydration or to celebrate special occasions, but also to prevent nutrition-related disorders. Consumers are paying more and more attention to food safety, which represents a primary goal all over the world. The demands on natural fermentation processes are increasing; however, such processes are difficult to control, and microbial spoilage can occur. Microbial spoilage can make beverages unacceptable to consumers. Many microorganisms can act as spoilers (e.g., bacteria, yeasts, and filamentous fungi).

In this Special Issue, “Microbial Spoilage of Beverages”, we invite specialists and researchers working in this field to submit original and review articles concerning: spoilage detection and occurrence in beverages, understanding spoilers’ adaptation to beverage environments and processing conditions, the adhesion properties of spoilage microorganisms, innovative approaches for detection of spoilers, microbial metabolites with a negative impact on beverage quality and safety, occurrence of toxic compounds (mycotoxins, biogenic amines, etc.) or pathogens in beverages, microbial control strategies, and analysis of spoiled beverages.

Prof. Giovanna Suzzi
Prof. Rosanna Tofalo
Dr. Giorgia Perpetuini
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Spoilage
  • Yeasts
  • Bacteria
  • Fermented and non-fermented beverages
  • Microbial control strategies
  • Beverage processing
  • Biofilm
  • Spoilers detection

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
The Use of Candida pyralidae and Pichia kluyveri to Control Spoilage Microorganisms of Raw Fruits Used for Beverage Production
Foods 2019, 8(10), 454; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8100454 - 06 Oct 2019
Cited by 5
Abstract
Undesired fermentation of fruit-derived beverages by fungal, yeast and bacterial spoilage organisms are among the major contributors of product losses in the food industry. As an alternative to chemical preservatives, the use of Candida pyralidae and Pichia kluyveri was assessed for antimicrobial activity [...] Read more.
Undesired fermentation of fruit-derived beverages by fungal, yeast and bacterial spoilage organisms are among the major contributors of product losses in the food industry. As an alternative to chemical preservatives, the use of Candida pyralidae and Pichia kluyveri was assessed for antimicrobial activity against several yeasts (Dekkera bruxellensis, Dekkera anomala, Zygosaccharomyces bailii) and fungi (Botrytis cinerea, Colletotrichum acutatum and Rhizopus stolonifer) associated with spoilage of fruit and fruit-derived beverages. The antagonistic properties of C. pyralidae and P. kluyveri were evaluated on cheap solidified medium (grape pomace extract) as well as on fruits (grapes and apples). Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from C. pyralidae and P. kluyveri deemed to have antimicrobial activity were identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). A cell suspension of C. pyralidae and P. kluyveri showed growth inhibition activity against all spoilage microorganisms studied. Direct contact and extracellular VOCs were two of the mechanisms of inhibition. Twenty-five VOCs belonging to the categories of alcohols, organic acids and esters were identified as potential sources for the biocontrol activity observed in this study. This study reports, for the first time, the ability of C. pyralidae to inhibit fungal growth and also for P. kluyveri to show growth inhibition activity against spoilage organisms (n = 6) in a single study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial Spoilage of Beverages)
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