Special Issue "Safety of Meat Products: Detection and Control of Microorganisms"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Beatrix Stessl
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department for Farm Animals and Veterinary Public Health, Institute of Milk Hygiene, Milk Technology and Food Science, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria
Interests: food microbiology, molecular epidemiology, tracing foodborne pathogens, alternative methods
Dr. Martina Ludewig
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department for Farm Animal and Public Health in Veterinary Medicine, Institute of Food Safety, Food Technology and Veterinary Public Health, University of Veterinary Medicine, Vienna, Austria
Interests: food microbiology, foodborne pathogens, technogical approaches

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The production of meat products is a highly sensitive area due to the possibility of the introduction of spoilage and pathogenic organisms from primary production to the final product at retail level. In order to achieve a risk-based assessment of pathogen contamination in primary as well as secondary production, longitudinal sampling approaches are needed that encompass all levels of sampling (raw material, intermediate product, food environment, and vectors). The latest findings based on culture-based as well as culture-independent microbiological and molecular biological methods are necessary and should be used to detect contamination events in order to improve food safety at the consumer, trade, and producer levels. These methods should be applied in a networked manner in order to provide the best possible insight into bacterial transmission pathways.

Dr. Beatrix Stessl
Dr. Martina Ludewig
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Foodborne pathogens
  • Spoilage microorganism
  • Longitudinal sampling approaches
  • Culture-dependent and culture-independent microorganism
  • Pathogen transmission
  • Alternative sampling methods and materials
  • Epidemiology
  • Transmission routes
  • Persistent microorganisms
  • Selection of resistance in microorganisms to environmental stress
  • Molecular typing and resistance profiling

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Communication
Citrobacter braakii Yield False-Positive Identification as Salmonella, a Note of Caution
Foods 2021, 10(9), 2177; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10092177 - 14 Sep 2021
Viewed by 313
Abstract
Background: Globally, Salmonella enterica is one of the leading causes of foodborne illness in humans. Food of animal origin is obligatorily tested for the presence of this pathogen. Unfortunately, in meat and meat products, this is often hampered by the presence of background [...] Read more.
Background: Globally, Salmonella enterica is one of the leading causes of foodborne illness in humans. Food of animal origin is obligatorily tested for the presence of this pathogen. Unfortunately, in meat and meat products, this is often hampered by the presence of background microbiota, which may present as false-positive Salmonella. Methods: For the identification of Salmonella spp. from meat samples of beef, pork, and poultry, the authorized detection method is PN-EN ISO 6579-1:2017-04 with the White–Kauffmann–Le Minor scheme, two biochemical tests: API 20E and VITEK II, and a real-time PCR-based technique. Results: Out of 42 presumptive strains of Salmonella, 83.3% Salmonella enterica spp. enterica, 14.3% Citrobacter braakii, and 12.4% Proteus mirabilis were detected from 180 meat samples. Conclusions: Presumptive strains of Salmonella should be identified based on genotypic properties such as DNA-based methods. The aim of this study was the isolation and identification of Salmonella spp. from miscellaneous meat sorts: beef, pork, and poultry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Safety of Meat Products: Detection and Control of Microorganisms)
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Article
Genotypic Characterization of Antimicrobial Resistant Salmonella spp. Strains from Three Poultry Processing Plants in Colombia
Foods 2021, 10(3), 491; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10030491 - 25 Feb 2021
Viewed by 688
Abstract
The poultry industry in Colombia has implemented several changes and measures in chicken processing to improve sanitary operations and control pathogens’ prevalence. However, there is no official in-plant microbial profile reference data currently available throughout the processing value chains. Hence, this research aimed [...] Read more.
The poultry industry in Colombia has implemented several changes and measures in chicken processing to improve sanitary operations and control pathogens’ prevalence. However, there is no official in-plant microbial profile reference data currently available throughout the processing value chains. Hence, this research aimed to study the microbial profiles and the antimicrobial resistance of Salmonella isolates in three plants. In total, 300 samples were collected in seven processing sites. Prevalence of Salmonella spp. and levels of Enterobacteriaceae were assessed. Additionally, whole-genome sequencing was conducted to characterize the isolated strains genotypically. Overall, the prevalence of Salmonella spp. in each establishment was 77%, 58% and 80% for plant A, B, and C. The mean levels of Enterobacteriaceae in the chicken rinsates were 5.03, 5.74, and 6.41 log CFU/mL for plant A, B, and C. Significant reductions were identified in the counts of post-chilling rinsate samples; however, increased levels were found in chicken parts. There were six distinct Salmonella spp. clusters with the predominant sequence types ST32 and ST28. The serotypes Infantis (54%) and Paratyphi B (25%) were the most commonly identified within the processing plants with a high abundance of antimicrobial resistance genes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Safety of Meat Products: Detection and Control of Microorganisms)
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