Microbial, Chemical and Physical Contamination of Food Products

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 December 2016) | Viewed by 64476

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. Senior Technical Officer, NSW Food Authority, Department of Primary Industries, Sydney, Australia
2. Adjunct Senior Lecturer in Food Microbiology, Department of Wine, Food and Molecular Biosciences, Lincoln University, New Zealand
Interests: food safety; microbiological risk assessment; foodborne pathogens; safe food supply; HACCP; food safety management; food security; microbial biotechnology
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

“Microbial, chemical and physical contamination of food products” is the title of this Special Issue of Foods. Ensuring the supply of safe food products is important to protecting public health. Food safety is generally compromised when food products get contaminated with a potential hazard. Hazards can be biological, chemical or physical in nature. These hazards have several routes throughout the supply chain (farm to fork) to enter and contaminate a food product. The food industry faces many global as well as regional contamination issues, existing and emerging, at all times, and continues to address them through scientific and technological developments. Therefore, it is vital for food safety management to understand the nature of contamination, its sources, risks to the consumer, and approaches to eliminating or reducing contaminant levels. Sound scientific knowledge is needed to provide food products that are free from contamination or with a minimal risk of a contamination This Special Issue invites manuscripts on all aspects of the contamination of food products.

Dr. Malik A. Hussain
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Editorial

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139 KiB  
Editorial
Food Contamination: Major Challenges of the Future
by Malik Altaf Hussain
Foods 2016, 5(2), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods5020021 - 23 Mar 2016
Cited by 25 | Viewed by 11111
Abstract
This issue of Foods is dedicated to discuss the microbial, chemical and physical contamination challenges of food products.[...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial, Chemical and Physical Contamination of Food Products)

Research

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435 KiB  
Communication
Listeria monocytogenes in Fresh Produce: Outbreaks, Prevalence and Contamination Levels
by Qi Zhu, Ravi Gooneratne and Malik Altaf Hussain
Foods 2017, 6(3), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods6030021 - 9 Mar 2017
Cited by 208 | Viewed by 17599
Abstract
Listeria monocytogenes, a member of the genus Listeria, is widely distributed in agricultural environments, such as soil, manure and water. This organism is a recognized foodborne pathogenic bacterium that causes many diseases, from mild gastroenteritis to severe blood and/or central nervous [...] Read more.
Listeria monocytogenes, a member of the genus Listeria, is widely distributed in agricultural environments, such as soil, manure and water. This organism is a recognized foodborne pathogenic bacterium that causes many diseases, from mild gastroenteritis to severe blood and/or central nervous system infections, as well as abortion in pregnant women. Generally, processed ready-to-eat and cold-stored meat and dairy products are considered high-risk foods for L. monocytogenes infections that cause human illness (listeriosis). However, recently, several listeriosis outbreaks have been linked to fresh produce contamination around the world. Additionally, many studies have detected L. monocytogenes in fresh produce samples and even in some minimally processed vegetables. Thus L. monocytogenes may contaminate fresh produce if present in the growing environment (soil and water). Prevention of biofilm formation is an important control measure to reduce the prevalence and survival of L. monocytogenes in growing environments and on fresh produce. This article specifically focuses on fresh produce–associated listeriosis outbreaks, prevalence in growing environments, contamination levels of fresh produce, and associated fresh produce safety challenges. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial, Chemical and Physical Contamination of Food Products)
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660 KiB  
Article
An Evaluation of Alternatives to Nitrites and Sulfites to Inhibit the Growth of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes in Meat Products
by Alexandre Lamas, José Manuel Miranda, Beatriz Vázquez, Alberto Cepeda and Carlos Manuel Franco
Foods 2016, 5(4), 74; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods5040074 - 31 Oct 2016
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 7481
Abstract
In recent years, the use of nitrites and sulfites as food preservatives has been a cause for concern due to the health problems that these additives can cause in humans. Natural products have been studied as an alternative, but most of them have [...] Read more.
In recent years, the use of nitrites and sulfites as food preservatives has been a cause for concern due to the health problems that these additives can cause in humans. Natural products have been studied as an alternative, but most of them have hardly been applied in the food industry for technological and economic reasons. In this sense, organic salts such as sodium acetate are a good alternative due to their affordability. Thus, this study evaluated the capacity of sodium nitrite, sodium sulfite, a sodium acetate product (TQI C-6000), and chitosan to inhibit two important foodborne pathogens, Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes. The MIC of each chemical was in vitro evaluated and their antibacterial action was subsequently checked in situ using minced meat as a food model. MIC values of sodium nitrite (10,000 mg/L) and sodium sulfite (50,000 mg/L) for Salmonella enterica were higher than the values allowed by legislation (450 mg/L for sulfites and 150 mg/L for nitrites). Additionally, the sodium acetate product caused the inhibition of Salmonella enterica and Listeria at a relative low quantity. The two foodborne pathogens were inhibited in the food model with 1% of the sodium acetate product. Additionally, there were no significant differences between sodium nitrite, sodium sulfite, and sodium acetate products in the inhibition of Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes in the food model. Thus, products based on sodium acetate can be an alternative to traditional preservatives in food products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial, Chemical and Physical Contamination of Food Products)
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2613 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Electrolytically-Generated Hypochlorous Acid (‘Electrolyzed Water’) for Sanitation of Meat and Meat-Contact Surfaces
by Shawnna Veasey and Peter M. Muriana
Foods 2016, 5(2), 42; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods5020042 - 13 Jun 2016
Cited by 44 | Viewed by 14155
Abstract
‘Electrolyzed water’ generators are readily available in the food industry as a renewable source of hypochlorous acid that eliminates the need for workers to handle hazardous hypochlorite concentrates. We applied electrolyzed water (EW) directly to multi-strain cocktails of Listeria monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7, [...] Read more.
‘Electrolyzed water’ generators are readily available in the food industry as a renewable source of hypochlorous acid that eliminates the need for workers to handle hazardous hypochlorite concentrates. We applied electrolyzed water (EW) directly to multi-strain cocktails of Listeria monocytogenes, E. coli O157:H7, and Salmonella sp. at 250 ppm free available chlorine (FAC) and achieved greater than 6-log reductions in 2 min. Lower EW values were examined as antimicrobial interventions for fresh meat (beef carcasses), processed meats (frankfurters), and food contact surfaces (slicing blades). Little or no reduction relative to controls was observed when generic E. coli-inoculated beef carcasses or L. monocytogenes-inoculated frankfurters were showered with EW. Spray application of EW (25 and 250-ppm FAC) onto L. monocytogenes-inoculated slicing blades showed that greater reductions were obtained with ‘clean’ (3.6 and 5.7-log reduction) vs. ‘dirty’ (0.6 and 3.3-log reduction) slicing blades, respectively. Trials with L. monocytogenes-inoculated protein-EW solutions demonstrated that protein content as low as 0.1% is capable of eliminating FAC, reducing antimicrobial activity against L. monocytogenes. EW appears better positioned as a surface sanitizer with minimal organic material that can otherwise act as an effective reducing agent to the oxidizing solution rendering it ineffective. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial, Chemical and Physical Contamination of Food Products)
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3177 KiB  
Article
Evaluation of Turmeric Powder Adulterated with Metanil Yellow Using FT-Raman and FT-IR Spectroscopy
by Sagar Dhakal, Kuanglin Chao, Walter Schmidt, Jianwei Qin, Moon Kim and Diane Chan
Foods 2016, 5(2), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods5020036 - 17 May 2016
Cited by 103 | Viewed by 12672
Abstract
Turmeric powder (Curcuma longa L.) is valued both for its medicinal properties and for its popular culinary use, such as being a component in curry powder. Due to its high demand in international trade, turmeric powder has been subject to economically driven, [...] Read more.
Turmeric powder (Curcuma longa L.) is valued both for its medicinal properties and for its popular culinary use, such as being a component in curry powder. Due to its high demand in international trade, turmeric powder has been subject to economically driven, hazardous chemical adulteration. This study utilized Fourier Transform-Raman (FT-Raman) and Fourier Transform-Infra Red (FT-IR) spectroscopy as separate but complementary methods for detecting metanil yellow adulteration of turmeric powder. Sample mixtures of turmeric powder and metanil yellow were prepared at concentrations of 30%, 25%, 20%, 15%, 10%, 5%, 1%, and 0.01% (w/w). FT-Raman and FT-IR spectra were acquired for these mixture samples as well as for pure samples of turmeric powder and metanil yellow. Spectral analysis showed that the FT-IR method in this study could detect the metanil yellow at the 5% concentration, while the FT-Raman method appeared to be more sensitive and could detect the metanil yellow at the 1% concentration. Relationships between metanil yellow spectral peak intensities and metanil yellow concentration were established using representative peaks at FT-Raman 1406 cm−1 and FT-IR 1140 cm−1 with correlation coefficients of 0.93 and 0.95, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbial, Chemical and Physical Contamination of Food Products)
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