Special Issue "Dietary Polysaccharides"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2017).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Charles Brennan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Wine, Food and Molecular Biosciences, Lincoln University, Lincoln 7647, Christchurch, New Zealand
Tel. 0064223147303
Interests: polysaccharide utilization; glycemic response; dietary fibre; food structure and function
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Margaret Brennan
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Centre for Food Research and Innovation, Department of Wine, Food and Molecular Biosciences, Lincoln University, Lincoln 85084, New Zealand
Interests: extrusion technology; dietary fibre; glycaemic response

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Polysaccharides from plants have been utilised by the food industry for many years as gums and stabilising agents. More recently, researchers have been interested in the use of polysaccharides to mediate carbohydrate digestion and thus manipulate the nutritional quality of foods. This is especially the case in the context of polysaccharides affecting postprandial blood glucose levels, obesity, diabetes, and even neuro-degenerative diseases. This Special Issue explores the link between polysaccharide use in foods and their impact, not only in food product quality, but also directly with nutrient uptake, bioavailability, and potential nutraceutical applications.

Prof. Charles Brennan
Dr. Margaret Brennan
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • carbohydrate chemistry
  • glycaemic response
  • diabetes
  • alzheimer’s disease
  • food structure
  • bioactive compounds

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessArticle
Optimization of Ultrasound-Assisted Extraction, Preliminary Characterization and In Vitro Antioxidant Activity of Polysaccharides from Green Pea Pods
Foods 2016, 5(4), 78; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods5040078 - 28 Nov 2016
Cited by 7
Abstract
In this study, ultrasound-assisted extraction of green pea pod polysaccharide (GPPP) was investigated and optimized using a central composite response surface design coupled with a numerical optimization technique. The effects of ultrasonic power (50–150 W), sonication time (20–80 min), ratio of water to [...] Read more.
In this study, ultrasound-assisted extraction of green pea pod polysaccharide (GPPP) was investigated and optimized using a central composite response surface design coupled with a numerical optimization technique. The effects of ultrasonic power (50–150 W), sonication time (20–80 min), ratio of water to raw material (20:1–40:1 mL/g) and extraction temperature (40–80 °C) on polysaccharide extraction yield were studied. The maximum extraction yield was obtained with a sonication power of 135.34 W, extraction time of 48.61 min, ratio of water to raw material of 33.6:1 mL/g and extraction temperature of 68.25 °C. Under these conditions, the experimental yield was 7.37% ± 0.13%, which was in close agreement with the predicted value (7.20%). The GPPP has been analyzed in order to identify a variety of chemical properties. The FT-IR spectrum demonstrated obvious characteristic peaks of polysaccharides. Furthermore, antioxidant activity of GPPP was evaluated by various antioxidant assays in vitro. The results revealed that GPPP possessed considerable DPPH free radical scavenging activity (91.03%), reducing power (0.63) and ferric reducing antioxidant power (0.34 mmol/L) at a total amount of 0.9 mg/mL. These findings indicated that GPPP extracted using an ultrasound-assisted extraction technique has potential as a novel source of natural antioxidant agent for future applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Polysaccharides)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
Mushroom Polysaccharides: Chemistry and Antiobesity, Antidiabetes, Anticancer, and Antibiotic Properties in Cells, Rodents, and Humans
Foods 2016, 5(4), 80; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods5040080 - 29 Nov 2016
Cited by 50
Abstract
More than 2000 species of edible and/or medicinal mushrooms have been identified to date, many of which are widely consumed, stimulating much research on their health-promoting properties. These properties are associated with bioactive compounds produced by the mushrooms, including polysaccharides. Although β-glucans (homopolysaccharides) [...] Read more.
More than 2000 species of edible and/or medicinal mushrooms have been identified to date, many of which are widely consumed, stimulating much research on their health-promoting properties. These properties are associated with bioactive compounds produced by the mushrooms, including polysaccharides. Although β-glucans (homopolysaccharides) are believed to be the major bioactive polysaccharides of mushrooms, other types of mushroom polysaccharides (heteropolysaccharides) also possess biological properties. Here we survey the chemistry of such health-promoting polysaccharides and their reported antiobesity and antidiabetic properties as well as selected anticarcinogenic, antimicrobial, and antiviral effects that demonstrate their multiple health-promoting potential. The associated antioxidative, anti-inflammatory, and immunomodulating activities in fat cells, rodents, and humans are also discussed. The mechanisms of action involve the gut microbiota, meaning the polysaccharides act as prebiotics in the digestive system. Also covered here are the nutritional, functional food, clinical, and epidemiological studies designed to assess the health-promoting properties of polysaccharides, individually and as blended mixtures, against obesity, diabetes, cancer, and infectious diseases, and suggestions for further research. The collated information and suggested research needs might guide further studies needed for a better understanding of the health-promoting properties of mushroom polysaccharides and enhance their use to help prevent and treat human chronic diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Polysaccharides)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessReview
Recent Advances in Techniques for Starch Esters and the Applications: A Review
Foods 2016, 5(3), 50; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods5030050 - 09 Jul 2016
Cited by 10
Abstract
Esterification is one of the most important methods to alter the structure of starch granules and improve its applications. Conventionally, starch esters are prepared by conventional or dual modification techniques, which have the disadvantages of being expensive, have regent overdoses, and are time-consuming. [...] Read more.
Esterification is one of the most important methods to alter the structure of starch granules and improve its applications. Conventionally, starch esters are prepared by conventional or dual modification techniques, which have the disadvantages of being expensive, have regent overdoses, and are time-consuming. In addition, the degree of substitution (DS) is often considered as the primary factor in view of its contribution to estimate substituted groups of starch esters. In order to improve the detection accuracy and production efficiency, different detection techniques, including titration, nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal gravimetric analysis/infrared spectroscopy (TGA/IR) and headspace gas chromatography (HS-GC), have been developed for DS. This paper gives a comprehensive overview on the recent advances in DS analysis and starch esterification techniques. Additionally, the advantages, limitations, some perspectives on future trends of these techniques and the applications of their derivatives in the food industry are also presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dietary Polysaccharides)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop