From Laboratory to Industrialization: Some Meat Science and Technology Issues That Need to Be Focused

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Meat".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 November 2023) | Viewed by 11032

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Meat Processing and Quality Control, Ministry of Education China, Synergetic Innovation Center of Food Safety and Nutrition, College of Food Science and Technology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, China
Interests: poultry meat processing; protein modification; maillard reaction; meat nutrition; meat metabolomics; meat materials; meat flavor; meat microorganisms and preservation; new non-thermal processing technology; plant-based meat

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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Meat Processing and Quality Control, Ministry of Education China, Synergetic Innovation Center of Food Safety and Nutrition, College of Food Science and Technology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, China
Interests: Chinese traditional meat products; protein modification; advanced glycation end products; meat nutrition; food omics; meat cold chain; meat flavor; meat preservation; new non-thermal processing technology; protein aggregation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the context of the gradual control of the COVID-19 epidemic and the gradual recovery of the industry, the meat industry is accelerating its transformation from the production side (quantity) to the consumer side (quality) under the opportunity of transformation and upgrading of the whole industrial chain. This means consumers are increasingly concerned about whether the meat on their plates is tastier, healthier, nutritious and safer. As a result, many scientific and technical problems arise.

For this Special Issue, we are seeking the submission of papers on a range of potential topics, including but not limited to the following:

  1. Meat flavor formation and color deterioration;
  2. Precise nutrition and digestion of processed meat;
  3. Hazardous substances formation and control;
  4. Meat authenticity and detection technology;
  5. Activity and intelligent packaging technology;
  6. Cold chain technology;
  7. Microbial control technology, etc.

Importantly, we look forward to more multidisciplinary integration development. Certain areas such as polymer materials, soft colloids, applied physics, analytical chemistry, AI, big data, and other disciplines in meat research helps us to better solve scientific and industrial bottlenecks. For this reason, this Special Issue of Foods is being released, focused on the key meat science and technology issues. It will provide an overview of the current status and future perspectives of meat science.

As part of the new generation of meat scientists, before doing basic research in the lab, we should raise our heads and look at the issues in the industry and listen to consumer concerns. Only in this way can the scientific research results of the laboratory better serve the industry.

Prof. Dr. Ming Huang
Dr. Zongshuai Zhu
Guest Editors

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Keywords

  • meat
  • science
  • technology
  • nutrition
  • safety
  • industrialization

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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14 pages, 2897 KiB  
Article
IoT-Enabled Electronic Nose System for Beef Quality Monitoring and Spoilage Detection
by Asrar Nabil Damdam, Levent Osman Ozay, Cagri Kaan Ozcan, Ashwaq Alzahrani, Raghad Helabi and Kahled Nabil Salama
Foods 2023, 12(11), 2227; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12112227 - 31 May 2023
Viewed by 2395
Abstract
Food spoilage is a major concern in the food industry, especially for highly perishable foods such as beef. In this paper, we present a versatile Internet of Things (IoT)-enabled electronic nose system to monitor food quality by evaluating the concentrations of volatile organic [...] Read more.
Food spoilage is a major concern in the food industry, especially for highly perishable foods such as beef. In this paper, we present a versatile Internet of Things (IoT)-enabled electronic nose system to monitor food quality by evaluating the concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The IoT system consists mainly of an electronic nose, temperature/humidity sensors, and an ESP32-S3 microcontroller to send the sensors’ data to the server. The electronic nose consists of a carbon dioxide gas sensor, an ammonia gas sensor, and an ethylene gas sensor. This paper’s primary focus is to use the system for identifying beef spoilage. Hence, the system performance was examined on four beef samples stored at different temperatures: two at 4 °C and two at 21 °C. Microbial population quantifications of aerobic bacteria, Lactic Acid Bacteria (LAB), and Pseudomonas spp., in addition to pH measurements, were conducted to evaluate the beef quality during a period of 7 days to identify the VOCs concentrations that are associated with raw beef spoilage. The spoilage concentrations that were identified using the carbon dioxide, ammonia, and ethylene sensors were 552 ppm–4751 ppm, 6 ppm–8 ppm, and 18.4 ppm–21.1 ppm, respectively, as determined using a 500 mL gas sensing chamber. Statistical analysis was conducted to correlate the bacterial growth with the VOCs production, where it was found that aerobic bacteria and Pseudomonas spp. are responsible for most of the VOCs production in raw beef. Full article
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14 pages, 1959 KiB  
Article
ACE Inhibitory Peptides Derived from Muscovy Duck (Cairina moschata) Plasma
by Zongshuai Zhu, Haoyu Guo, Yan Xu, Anthony Pius Bassey, Ahtisham Ali, Ming Huang and Jichao Huang
Foods 2023, 12(1), 50; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12010050 - 22 Dec 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1817
Abstract
In this study, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides (ACE–IPs) derived from Muscovy duck (Cairina moschata) plasma hydrolysate (MDPH) were investigated. According to the general research protocol for bioactive peptides, the crude ACE–IPs of Muscovy duck plasma were separated and purified by ultrafiltration, [...] Read more.
In this study, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides (ACE–IPs) derived from Muscovy duck (Cairina moschata) plasma hydrolysate (MDPH) were investigated. According to the general research protocol for bioactive peptides, the crude ACE–IPs of Muscovy duck plasma were separated and purified by ultrafiltration, gel chromatography and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (RP–HPLC). Then the components with the highest ACE inhibition potential were selected for identification. Finally, the inhibition mechanism was explored by molecular docking and in silico simulated digestion. A total of 121 peptides was detected, and five were screened for synthesis verification and molecular docking. The peptide VALSSLRP revealed high ACE inhibitory activity (91.67 ± 0.73%) because this peptide bound tightly to the S1′ pocket and formed 3 hydrogen bonds. Meaningfully, this work provides some new information about the generation of ACE–IPs derived from duck blood plasma. Full article
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12 pages, 832 KiB  
Article
Understanding the Development of Heterocyclic Aromatic Amines in Fried Bacon and in the Remaining Oil after Pan-Frying in Five Different Vegetable Oils
by Hongzhen Du, Ziyi Wang, Yuexin Li, Qian Liu, Qian Chen and Baohua Kong
Foods 2022, 11(21), 3491; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11213491 - 03 Nov 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1060
Abstract
The physicochemical properties of five vegetable oils (peanut, corn, rapeseed, sunflower seed, and soybean) and their impact on the development of heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs) in pan-fried bacon and in the remaining oil were investigated. Corn oil led to the lowest total free [...] Read more.
The physicochemical properties of five vegetable oils (peanut, corn, rapeseed, sunflower seed, and soybean) and their impact on the development of heterocyclic aromatic amines (HAAs) in pan-fried bacon and in the remaining oil were investigated. Corn oil led to the lowest total free amino acids (FAAs) contents and glucose content of fried bacon (p < 0.05) and rapeseed oil led to the lowest creatine content of fried bacon (p < 0.05). Bacon fried in corn oil had the highest HAA contents (p < 0.05). The total HAA contents of the oils after frying were lowest in rapeseed and soybean oils (p < 0.05). The type of vegetable oil used affected the color of the fried bacon but not the flavor and taste (p < 0.05). To reduce the HAA concentrations of fried bacon, the type of vegetable oil should be considered. Full article
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Review

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25 pages, 2553 KiB  
Review
Research Progress on Nutritional Value, Preservation and Processing of Fish—A Review
by Ahtisham Ali, Shuai Wei, Adnan Ali, Imran Khan, Qinxiu Sun, Qiuyu Xia, Zefu Wang, Zongyuan Han, Yang Liu and Shucheng Liu
Foods 2022, 11(22), 3669; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11223669 - 16 Nov 2022
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 5075
Abstract
The global population has rapidly expanded in the last few decades and is continuing to increase at a rapid pace. To meet this growing food demand fish is considered a balanced food source due to their high nutritious value and low cost. Fish [...] Read more.
The global population has rapidly expanded in the last few decades and is continuing to increase at a rapid pace. To meet this growing food demand fish is considered a balanced food source due to their high nutritious value and low cost. Fish are rich in well-balanced nutrients, a good source of polyunsaturated fatty acids and impose various health benefits. Furthermore, the most commonly used preservation technologies including cooling, freezing, super-chilling and chemical preservatives are discussed, which could prolong the shelf life. Non-thermal technologies such as pulsed electric field (PEF), fluorescence spectroscopy, hyperspectral imaging technique (HSI) and high-pressure processing (HPP) are used over thermal techniques in marine food industries for processing of most economical fish products in such a way as to meet consumer demands with minimal quality damage. Many by-products are produced as a result of processing techniques, which have caused serious environmental pollution. Therefore, highly advanced technologies to utilize these by-products for high-value-added product preparation for various applications are required. This review provides updated information on the nutritional value of fish, focusing on their preservation technologies to inhibit spoilage, improve shelf life, retard microbial and oxidative degradation while extending the new applications of non-thermal technologies, as well as reconsidering the values of by-products to obtain bioactive compounds that can be used as functional ingredients in pharmaceutical, cosmetics and food processing industries. Full article
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