Meat Quality, Sensory and Consumer Preferences and Attitudes

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Meat".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 2565

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, College of Agriculture & Natural Resources, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA
2. Department of Animal Science, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI, USA
Interests: meat science; meat quality; eating quality; palatability; consumers; sensory evaluation; sensory analysis of meat; meat processing; tenderness; flavor; beef; lamb
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Several antemortem factors, including diet/nutrition, age, genetics, and other environmental factors, can influence meat quality. From the time muscle is converted to meat, several postmortem factors, such as aging, packaging and retail display conditions, enhancement, cooking methods, and many others, can subsequently alter the quality of meat. This Special Issue of Foods will be open to studies investigating any ante- and postmortem factors affecting meat quality. 

As a follow up to a previous Special Issue, “Consumer Preferences and Acceptance of Meat Products”, we welcome submissions investigating consumer preferences and attitudes towards meat quality, covering multiple sensory aspects, particularly eating quality and color. At the point of purchase, consumers often assess meat quality using extrinsic cues such as color, marbling, leanness, brand or labeling claims, and price to determine which meat product(s) to buy. However, consumer satisfaction and their willingness to pay is ultimately derived from current and past eating experiences relating to tenderness, juiciness, and flavor of cooked meat.

What drives these consumer preferences for meat products and how do these preferences influence consumer attitudes and satisfaction? You are cordially invited to submit review articles and original research papers related to “Meat Quality, Sensory and Consumer Preferences and Attitudes”.

Dr. Andrea Garmyn
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • eating quality
  • consumer satisfaction
  • meat tenderness
  • meat flavor
  • meat color
  • sensory evaluation
  • sensory preference
  • willingness to pay
  • branded meat

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 495 KiB  
Article
Influence of Beef Hot Carcass Weight on Sensory Characteristics of Strip Loin, Eye of Round, and Denver Cut Steaks
by Christina E. Bakker, Samantha R. Egolf, Lydia M. O’Sullivan, Ryan B. Cox, Heather R. Rode-Atkins, Amanda D. Blair, Keith R. Underwood and J. Kyle Grubbs
Foods 2024, 13(6), 961; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13060961 - 21 Mar 2024
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Abstract
The objective of this research was to investigate the influence of beef hot carcass weight (HCW) on consumer sensory attributes. Beef carcasses (n = 116) were selected based on the USDA quality grade and HCW. Lightweight (LW; 296–341 kg), middleweight (MW; 386–432 kg), [...] Read more.
The objective of this research was to investigate the influence of beef hot carcass weight (HCW) on consumer sensory attributes. Beef carcasses (n = 116) were selected based on the USDA quality grade and HCW. Lightweight (LW; 296–341 kg), middleweight (MW; 386–432 kg), or heavyweight (HW; 466–524 kg) carcasses with USDA Choice (LC) or USDA Select (SEL) quality grades were used in this study. Carcasses were tracked through fabrication and the semitendinosus, chuck roll, and strip loin were collected and fabricated into eye of round, Denver cut, and strip loin steaks, respectively, for consumer sensory evaluation. USDA Select MW Denver cut steaks had increased overall liking and texture liking scores and were more tender and juicier than the SEL LW steaks (p ≤ 0.02). USDA Select MW strip loin steaks had increased overall and flavor liking scores and were more tender than the SEL LW steaks (p ≤ 0.02). USDA Choice MW eye of round steaks had increased overall, flavor, and texture liking scores and were juicier than the LW eye of round steaks (p ≤ 0.04). The steaks evaluated in this study were differentially impacted by HCW and little to no clear pattern of effects could be determined across cut or quality grade. Additional research is needed to determine the most acceptable HCW from a consumer perspective. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Meat Quality, Sensory and Consumer Preferences and Attitudes)
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16 pages, 2262 KiB  
Article
A Machine Learning Approach Investigating Consumers’ Familiarity with and Involvement in the Just Noticeable Color Difference and Cured Color Characterization Scale
by Guillermo Ripoll, Begoña Panea and María Ángeles Latorre
Foods 2023, 12(24), 4426; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12244426 - 10 Dec 2023
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Abstract
The aim of this study was to elucidate the relations between the visual color perception and the instrumental color of dry-cured ham, with a specific focus on determining the Just Noticeable Color Difference (JNCD). Additionally, we studied the influence of consumer involvement and [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to elucidate the relations between the visual color perception and the instrumental color of dry-cured ham, with a specific focus on determining the Just Noticeable Color Difference (JNCD). Additionally, we studied the influence of consumer involvement and familiarity on color-related associations and JNCD. Slices of ham were examined to determine their instrumental color and photos were taken. Consumers were surveyed about color scoring and matching of the pictures; they were also asked about their involvement in food, familiarity with cured ham, and sociodemographic characteristics. Consumers were clustered according to their level of involvement and the JNCD was calculated for the clusters. An interpretable machine learning algorithm was used to relate the visual appraisal to the instrumental color. A JNCD of ΔEab* = 6.2 was established, although it was lower for younger people. ΔEab* was also influenced by the involvement of consumers. The machine-learning algorithm results were better than those obtained via multiple linear regressions when consumers’ psychographic characteristics were included. The most important color variables of the algorithm were L* and hab. The findings of this research underscore the impact of consumers’ involvement and familiarity with dry-cured ham on their perception of color. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Meat Quality, Sensory and Consumer Preferences and Attitudes)
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13 pages, 807 KiB  
Article
Quantifying the Effect of Grilling and Roasting on the Eating Quality of Lamb Leg Muscles
by Hussein Al-Moadhen, Jarrod C. Lees, Liselotte Pannier and Peter McGilchrist
Foods 2023, 12(19), 3609; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12193609 - 28 Sep 2023
Viewed by 812
Abstract
Lamb eating quality was measured using untrained consumer sensory panels to determine the difference in intrinsic eating quality scores of grilled and roasted leg cut muscles. The Knuckle, Outside flat, and Topside from both legs of 65 mixed-sex lambs from diverse genetic backgrounds [...] Read more.
Lamb eating quality was measured using untrained consumer sensory panels to determine the difference in intrinsic eating quality scores of grilled and roasted leg cut muscles. The Knuckle, Outside flat, and Topside from both legs of 65 mixed-sex lambs from diverse genetic backgrounds were prepared using alternative grill and roast cook methods. Each sample was eaten by 10 consumers and scored for tenderness, juiciness, flavor, and overall liking. All cuts scored higher (p < 0.001) when grilled compared with when roasted for all traits except for Topside tenderness. Grilled Knuckle scored higher than roast Knuckle by 13.6%, 23.9%, 14.4% and 15.8% for tenderness, juiciness, flavor, and overall liking, respectively. The grilled Outside flat scored higher than roast Outside flat by 14.1%, 27.1%, 10.9%, and 14.3% for tenderness, juiciness, flavor, and overall liking, respectively. Finally, grilled Topside scored higher than roast Topside by 21.3%, 7.4%, and 6.6% for juiciness, flavor, and overall liking, respectively. Carcass traits for intramuscular fat and shear force had a significant (p < 0.001) effect on all eating quality traits for both grill and roast cuts. Girth rib fat had a significant effect (p = 0.01) on tenderness and juiciness (p = 0.03) for Outside flat and Topside but had no effect (p > 0.05) on Knuckle for both grill and roast. This study identified that specific cooking methods can improve sensory traits for individual cuts and suggests that a cut-by-cook method eating quality model for sheepmeat can therefore increase consumer satisfaction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Meat Quality, Sensory and Consumer Preferences and Attitudes)
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