Special Issue "Novel Food Preservation Methods and Their Applications"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Engineering and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 January 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Marina Ramos
Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
University of Alicante. Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition & Food Science Dept., Alicante 03690, Spain
Interests: food packaging; thin films and nanotechnology; extraction; materials chemistry; antioxidant activity; analytical chemistry; antioxidants; food analysis; multivariate data analysis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Novel food preservation technologies are continuously demanding the development of more robust, efficient, sensitive, and cost-effective methods to guarantee the quality, safety, quality, and traceability during product shelf life, in agreement with consumer demands and legislation requirements. Consequently, the research about novel methods used in food preservation is a promising challenge to be applied in innovative applications and future trends with a great variety of technologies within reach of this topic.

In this sense, this Special Issue, “Novel Food Preservation Methods and Their Applications”, will cover a selection of original research and current review articles related to the use of new food preservation methods to ensure the quality and safety of the final product.

This Special Issue will focus primarily on following topics: 

  • Emerging food processing and preparation technologies;
  • Food process, structure, and property relationship;
  • Food processing, preparation, and preservation needs;
  • Consumer trust and acceptance;
  • Food preservation and smart packaging.

Original and review papers are welcome for inclusion in this Special Issue of Foods.

Dr. Marina Ramos
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food preservation
  • shelf life
  • food quality
  • food safety
  • emerging food processing
  • smart packaging

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Application of Plant Extracts to Control Postharvest Gray Mold and Susceptibility of Apple Fruits to B. cinerea from Different Plant Hosts
Foods 2020, 9(10), 1430; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9101430 - 09 Oct 2020
Abstract
Sustainable plant protection can be applied on apples against fungal pathogens such as Botrytis cinerea (which is responsible for gray mold)—a significant global postharvest disease. This pathogen can affect a wide range of hosts; and fruits may have variable susceptibilities to B. cinerea [...] Read more.
Sustainable plant protection can be applied on apples against fungal pathogens such as Botrytis cinerea (which is responsible for gray mold)—a significant global postharvest disease. This pathogen can affect a wide range of hosts; and fruits may have variable susceptibilities to B. cinerea from different plant hosts. New possibilities to control gray mold in food production are under demand due to the emergence of resistance against antifungal agents in fungal pathogens. Cinnamon, pimento, and laurel extracts were previously assessed for antifungal activities under in vitro conditions and were found to have the potential to be effective against postharvest gray mold. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the antifungal activity of cinnamon, pimento, and laurel extracts in vitro and against postharvest gray mold on apples to determine the susceptibility of apple fruits to B. cinerea from different plant hosts, and to analyze the chemical composition of the extracts. Apples (cv. “Connell Red”) were treated with different concentrations of extracts and inoculated with B. cinerea isolates from apple and strawberry followed by evaluation of in vitro antifungal activity. The results reveal that most of the concentrations of the extracts that were investigated were not efficient enough when assessed in the postharvest assay, despite having demonstrated a high in vitro antifungal effect. Apples were less susceptible to B. cinerea isolated from strawberry. To conclude, cinnamon extract was found to be the most effective against apple gray mold; however, higher concentrations of the extracts are required for the efficient inhibition of B. cinerea in fruits during storage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Food Preservation Methods and Their Applications)
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Open AccessArticle
New Edible Packaging Material with Function in Shelf Life Extension: Applications for the Meat and Cheese Industries
Foods 2020, 9(5), 562; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9050562 - 02 May 2020
Abstract
Nowadays, biopolymer films have gained notoriety among the packaging materials. Some studies clearly test their effectiveness for certain periods of time, with applicability in the food industry. This research has been carried out in two directions. Firstly, the development and testing of the [...] Read more.
Nowadays, biopolymer films have gained notoriety among the packaging materials. Some studies clearly test their effectiveness for certain periods of time, with applicability in the food industry. This research has been carried out in two directions. Firstly, the development and testing of the new edible material: general appearance, thickness, retraction ratio, color, transmittance, microstructure, roughness, and porosity, as well as mechanical and solubility tests. Secondly, testing of the packaged products—slices of cheese and prosciutto—in the new material and their maintenance at refrigeration conditions for 5 months; thus, the peroxide index, color, and water activity index were evaluated for the packaged products. The results emphasize that the packaging is a lipophilic one and does not allow wetting or any changes in the food moisture. The results indicate the stability of the parameters within three months and present the changes occurring within the fourth and fifth months. Microbiological tests indicated an initial microbial growth, both for cheese slices and ham slices. Time testing indicated a small increase in the total count number over the 5-month period: 23 cfu/g were found of fresh slices of prosciutto and 27 cfu/g in the case of the packaged ones; for slices of cheese, the total count of microorganisms indicated 7 cfu/g in the initial stage and 11 cfu/g after 5 months. The results indicate that the film did not facilitate the growth of the existing microorganisms, and highlight the need to purchase food from safe places, especially in the case of raw-dried products that have not undergone heat treatment, which may endanger the health of the consumer. The new material tested represents a promising substitute for commercial and unsustainable plastic packaging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Food Preservation Methods and Their Applications)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Influence of Plasma Treatment on the Polyphenols of Food Products—A Review
Foods 2020, 9(7), 929; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9070929 - 14 Jul 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
The consumption of bioactive compounds, especially phenolic compounds, has been associated with health benefits such as improving the health status and reducing the risk of developing certain diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and neurodegenerative disorders. However, the preservation of natural bioactive compounds [...] Read more.
The consumption of bioactive compounds, especially phenolic compounds, has been associated with health benefits such as improving the health status and reducing the risk of developing certain diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and neurodegenerative disorders. However, the preservation of natural bioactive compounds in food products is a major challenge for the food industry. Due to the major impact of conventional thermal processing, nonthermal technologies such as cold plasma have been proposed as one of the most promising solutions for the food industry. This review will cover the current knowledge about the effects of cold plasma in polyphenols found in food products. The increasing number of studies in the last years supports the continuous search for specific treatment conditions for each type of food and the central role of plasma treatments as a food-processing technology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Food Preservation Methods and Their Applications)
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Open AccessReview
An Overview of the Applications of Nanomaterials and Nanodevices in the Food Industry
Foods 2020, 9(2), 148; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9020148 - 03 Feb 2020
Cited by 3
Abstract
The efficient progress in nanotechnology has transformed many aspects of food science and the food industry with enhanced investment and market share. Recent advances in nanomaterials and nanodevices such as nanosensors, nano-emulsions, nanopesticides or nanocapsules are intended to bring about innovative applications in [...] Read more.
The efficient progress in nanotechnology has transformed many aspects of food science and the food industry with enhanced investment and market share. Recent advances in nanomaterials and nanodevices such as nanosensors, nano-emulsions, nanopesticides or nanocapsules are intended to bring about innovative applications in the food industry. In this review, the current applications of nanotechnology for packaging, processing, and the enhancement of the nutritional value and shelf life of foods are targeted. In addition, the functionality and applicability of food-related nanotechnologies are also highlighted and critically discussed in order to provide an insight into the development and evaluation of the safety of nanotechnology in the food industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Food Preservation Methods and Their Applications)
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