Special Issue "Application of Lactic Acid Bacteria in Food Preservation and Fermentation"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Microbiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Maria de Lurdes Nunes Enes Dapkevicius
Website
Guest Editor
University of the Azores, Faculty of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences/ Institute of Agricultural and Environmental Research and Technology (IITAA), Ponta Delgada, Portugal
Interests: antimicrobials; bacterial; probiotics; lactic acid bacteria; microbiology; foodborne diseases; food microbiology; food science and technology
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Humankind and lactic acid bacteria (LAB) have cohabited since the dawn of our existence as a species. They are part of our microbiota and they are in and on our food. Throughout the history of humankind, lactic fermentation has been a way to preserve foods, obtain a range of novel flavors and textures and help us stay healthy. Today, LAB and their bioactivities are major “microbial shareholders” in the profitable market of probiotics. In some food systems, however, LAB are part of the deterioration microbiota. Most LAB species are considered safe for food uses, but some also raise concerns due to their potential for opportunism. Much has been written on LAB, but much more remains to be investigated, discussed, and summarized to help us better understand—and make better use—of this exciting group of bacteria. This Special Issue provides an opportunity to take part in the building of universal knowledge on LAB in a journal that offers open access and has a wide readership.

Prof. Maria de Lurdes Nunes Enes Dapkevicius
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Lactic acid bacteria
  • Food fermentation
  • Food microbiota
  • Probiotics
  • Safety
  • Deterioration
  • Preservation
  • Starter cultures
  • Adjunct cultures
  • Protective cultures

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG and Biochemical Agents Enrich the Shelf Life of Fresh-Cut Bell Pepper (Capsicum annuum L. var. grossum (L.) Sendt)
Foods 2020, 9(9), 1252; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9091252 - 07 Sep 2020
Abstract
This work analyzed the individual and combined effects of biochemical additives and probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG on red and yellow fresh-cut bell pepper (R- and Y-FCBP, respectively) stored at two different temperatures (4 °C and 15 °C) for 15 days. The results [...] Read more.
This work analyzed the individual and combined effects of biochemical additives and probiotic strain Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG on red and yellow fresh-cut bell pepper (R- and Y-FCBP, respectively) stored at two different temperatures (4 °C and 15 °C) for 15 days. The results revealed that the combined application of biochemical additives and L. rhamnosus GG inhibited the colonization of total bacterial counts (25.10%), total Salmonella counts (38.32%), total Listeria counts (23.75%), and total fungal counts (61.90%) in FCBP. Total bacterial colonization was found to be higher in R-FCBP (1188.09 ± 9.25 CFU g−1) than Y-FCBP (863.96 ± 7.21 CFU g−1). The storage at 4 °C was prevented 35.38% of microbial colonization in FCBP. Importantly, the L. rhamnosus GG count remained for up to 12 days. Moreover, the combined inoculation of the biochemical additives and L. rhamnosus GG treatments (T3) maintained the quality of R- and Y-FCBP for up to 12 days at 4 °C without any loss of antioxidant properties. This work reports the successful utilization of L. rhamnosus GG as a preservative agent for maintaining the quality of FCBP by preventing microbial colonization. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
The Effect of Rosa spinosissima Fruits Extract on Lactic Acid Bacteria Growth and Other Yoghurt Parameters
Foods 2020, 9(9), 1167; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9091167 - 24 Aug 2020
Abstract
The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of purified extract from Rosa spinosissima fruits on the quality characteristics and antioxidant properties of yoghurt. The extract, added to yoghurt at a concentration of 0.1% and 0.2%, contained high quantities of phenolic [...] Read more.
The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of purified extract from Rosa spinosissima fruits on the quality characteristics and antioxidant properties of yoghurt. The extract, added to yoghurt at a concentration of 0.1% and 0.2%, contained high quantities of phenolic compounds and exhibited high antioxidant activity due to the presence of anthocyanins flavan-3-ols, flavonols and ellagitannins. Yoghurt physicochemical properties, microbiology and antioxidant properties were evaluated after 1, 7 and 14 days of storage at a temperature of 4 °C. The data revealed a positive influence of rose preparation on yoghurt’s microflora and on its other properties. The highest count of traditional yoghurt microflora was observed in samples with 0.2% of extract. Its addition had a positive effect on the yoghurts’ color, giving them a characteristic pink color of an intensity dependent on additive concentration. It also significantly affected the yoghurts’ antioxidant properties, which were stable during storage, as well as the content of the introduced phenolic compounds. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Probiotic Properties and Antioxidant Activities of Pediococcus pentosaceus SC28 and Levilactobacillus brevis KU15151 in Fermented Black Gamju
Foods 2020, 9(9), 1154; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9091154 - 21 Aug 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
Black gamju is Korean traditional beverage fermented with molds. The aim of this study was to assess the probiotic properties and antioxidant activities of novel Pediococcus pentosaceus SC28 and Levilactobacillus brevis KU15151 to develop black gamju with bioactive properties for health. Tolerance against [...] Read more.
Black gamju is Korean traditional beverage fermented with molds. The aim of this study was to assess the probiotic properties and antioxidant activities of novel Pediococcus pentosaceus SC28 and Levilactobacillus brevis KU15151 to develop black gamju with bioactive properties for health. Tolerance against artificial gastric juice and bile salts, adhesion ability on HT-29 cells of strains, and antibiotics susceptibility were evaluated as probiotics, and various enzyme productions were detected. The 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay, 2,2′-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate, and β-carotene bleaching assay were used for antioxidant activity of samples. The tolerance of both strains to artificial gastric juice and bile salts (Oxgall) was more than 90%. Additionally, both strains did not produce β-glucuronidase and were resistant to gentamicin, kanamycin, streptomycin, and ciprofloxacin. After fermentation of black gamju with each strain, the number of viable lactic acid bacteria increased to 8.25–8.95 log colony forming unit/mL, but the pH value of fermented samples decreased more (to pH 3.33–3.41) than that of control (pH 4.37). L. brevis KU15151 showed higher adhesion activity to HT-29 cells and antioxidant effects than P. pentosaceus SC28 in three antioxidant assays. Full article
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Review

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Open AccessReview
A Review on Adventitious Lactic Acid Bacteria from Table Olives
Foods 2020, 9(7), 948; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9070948 - 17 Jul 2020
Abstract
Spontaneous fermentation constitutes the basis of the chief natural method of processing of table olives, where autochthonous strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) play a dominant role. A thorough literature search has unfolded 197 reports worldwide, published in the last two decades, that [...] Read more.
Spontaneous fermentation constitutes the basis of the chief natural method of processing of table olives, where autochthonous strains of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) play a dominant role. A thorough literature search has unfolded 197 reports worldwide, published in the last two decades, that indicate an increasing interest in table olive-borne LAB, especially in Mediterranean countries. This review attempted to extract extra information from such a large body of work, namely, in terms of correlations between LAB strains isolated, manufacture processes, olive types, and geographical regions. Spain produces mostly green olives by Spanish-style treatment, whereas Italy and Greece produce mainly green and black olives, respectively, by both natural and Spanish-style. More than 40 species belonging to nine genera of LAB have been described; the genus most often cited is Lactobacillus, with L. plantarum and L. pentosus as most frequent species—irrespective of country, processing method, or olive type. Certain LAB species are typically associated with cultivar, e.g., Lactobacillus parafarraginis with Spanish Manzanilla, or L. paraplantarum with Greek Kalamata and Conservolea, Portuguese Galega, and Italian Tonda di Cagliari. Despite the potential of native LAB to serve as starter cultures, extensive research and development efforts are still needed before this becomes a commercial reality in table olive fermentation. Full article
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