Advanced Technologies for Enhancing Structure and Functions of Films and Coatings

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Engineering and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2024) | Viewed by 6358

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
1. Department of Food Technology, Faculty of Technology, Tomas Bata University in Zlín, Nám. T. G. Masaryka 5555, 760 01 Zlín, Czech Republic
2. Department of Physical Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Palacky University in Olomouc, Křižkovského Nám. 511/8, 779 00 Olomouc, Czech Republic
Interests: food physics and food physical chemistry; nanotechnology and material engineering; applied colloid and interface science in food technology; material science and engineering in food technology; applied acoustics in material science and technology; plasma chemistry in food packaging and technology
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Food storage, manipulation and processing require many operations where either the processed foods coatings or their packaging are directly applied. Therefore, this prospected Special Issue aims to include studies on enhancing the functionality of the films and coatings used in the food industry by modifying their structure and composition, e.g., by embedding or encapsulating the active ingredients. The processing technologies applied in these processes are mainly gelation, flow, melting, crosslinking, heating, cooling and freezing. The final solid films and coatings of the food products will be characterized using the wide range of physicochemical, biochemical and materials engineering techniques.

Due to the complexity of the subject, our focus will be limited to studies related to plant and plant-based products, milk and milk-based products and meat (raw and processed).

We invite you to submit your contribution in the form of original research papers or reviews to be published in this Special Issue of Foods. We aim to compile original research papers and reviews from international research groups to provide valuable insights into the present state of the art of the topic and technology, challenges and innovative approaches.

Thank you for considering our invitation.

Prof. Dr. Ľubomír Lapčík
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • foods preservation
  • foods packaging
  • coatings and films

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 1612 KiB  
Article
Chitosan Coating with Rosemary Extract Increases Shelf Life and Reduces Water Losses from Beef
by Allison F. de Lima, Ricardo H. de L. Leite, Marília W. F. Pereira, Maria R. L. Silva, Thiago L. A. C. de Araújo, Dorgival M. de Lima Júnior, Marina de N. B. Gomes and Patrícia de O. Lima
Foods 2024, 13(9), 1353; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13091353 - 27 Apr 2024
Viewed by 885
Abstract
This study aimed to evaluate the influence of films based on chitosan and rosemary extract on the physicochemical, microbiological, and oxidative characteristics of beef. Refrigerated steaks of Longissimus dorsi were distributed in a factorial arrangement (4 × 4) into four treatments consisting of [...] Read more.
This study aimed to evaluate the influence of films based on chitosan and rosemary extract on the physicochemical, microbiological, and oxidative characteristics of beef. Refrigerated steaks of Longissimus dorsi were distributed in a factorial arrangement (4 × 4) into four treatments consisting of four edible films (control; chitosan; chitosan + 4% rosemary extract; and chitosan + 8% rosemary extract) and four days of aging (0, 2, 4, and 8 days). Incorporating 4% or 8% rosemary extract into the chitosan film improved the characteristics of the films in terms of moisture absorption and elasticity. The edible coatings with chitosan and rosemary extract and the different days of aging increased the tenderness and decreased the lipid oxidation of beef. In addition, the chitosan films containing rosemary extract increased the water-holding capacity and decreased the cooking losses of beef. The films containing 4% and 8% rosemary extract decreased the development of mesophilic and psychrotrophic bacteria and Staphylococcus ssp. in beef. We recommend incorporating 4% rosemary extract into chitosan-based coatings to preserve the quality of refrigerated beef. Full article
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18 pages, 4547 KiB  
Article
Preparation of Phosphorylated Auricularia cornea var. Li. Polysaccharide Liposome Gel and Analysis of Its In Vitro Antioxidant Activity
by Wenguang Fan, Xintong Jiang, Qinyang Li, Jiansheng Wang, Minghui Lv and Junmei Liu
Foods 2024, 13(2), 335; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13020335 - 20 Jan 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1050
Abstract
In this study, Auricularia cornea var. Li. polysaccharides (ACP) were used as the research object to prepare liposome gel and determine its antioxidant activity in vitro. Phosphorylated Auricularia cornea var. Li. polysaccharides (P-ACP) were prepared via the phosphorylation of ACP by the phosphate [...] Read more.
In this study, Auricularia cornea var. Li. polysaccharides (ACP) were used as the research object to prepare liposome gel and determine its antioxidant activity in vitro. Phosphorylated Auricularia cornea var. Li. polysaccharides (P-ACP) were prepared via the phosphorylation of ACP by the phosphate method. Additionally, phosphorylated Auricularia cornea var. Li. polysaccharide liposomes (P-ACPL) were prepared using a reverse evaporation method. Finally, phosphorylated Auricularia cornea var. Li. polysaccharide liposome gel (P-ACPLG) was prepared by dispersing the P-ACPL in the gel matrix. The results show that the phosphorylation of the P-ACP was 15.51%, the containment rate of the P-ACPL was 84.50%, the average particle size was (192.2 ± 3.3) nm, and the particle size distribution map had a homogeneous peak, resulting in the particle dispersion being uniform and the polydispersion index (PDI) being 0.134 ± 0.021. The average Zeta potential was (−33.4 ± 0.57) mV. In addition, the in vitro antioxidant activity of the P-ACPL was slightly higher than that of the ACP and P-ACP. After the P-ACPL was emulsified into P-ACPLG, the DPPH, hydroxyl radical clearance, and reducing the ability of P-ACPL remained unchanged. In general, the P-ACPLG prepared in this study has good antioxidant activity in vitro and can retain the antioxidant activity of P-ACPL in vitro well. Full article
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21 pages, 4353 KiB  
Article
Control of Browning, Enzyme Activity, and Quality in Stored Fresh-cut Fruit Salads through Chitosan Coating Enriched with Bergamot Juice Powder
by Bahar Demircan and Yakup Sedat Velioglu
Foods 2024, 13(1), 147; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13010147 - 1 Jan 2024
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1714
Abstract
In this study, fresh-cut fruit salads composed of apples, pears, kiwis, and pineapples were stored at +4 °C for 18 days under distinct conditions: non-coated (NC), chitosan-coated (CH), and bergamot juice powder extract-enriched chitosan-coated (CHBE). Storage endpoint decay percentages were as follows: NC [...] Read more.
In this study, fresh-cut fruit salads composed of apples, pears, kiwis, and pineapples were stored at +4 °C for 18 days under distinct conditions: non-coated (NC), chitosan-coated (CH), and bergamot juice powder extract-enriched chitosan-coated (CHBE). Storage endpoint decay percentages were as follows: NC group: 100%, CH group: 26.67–53.3%, CHBE group: 13.33–26.67%. CHBE had the highest moisture content (87.05–89.64%), soluble solids (12.40–13.26%), and chroma values (2.35–6.60). CHBE and NC groups had 2.10% and 6.61% weight loss, respectively. The NC group had the highest polyphenol oxidase activity (19.48 U mL−1) and browning index (0.70 A420/g); CH group: 0.85 U mL−1, 0.35 A420/g; CHBE group: 0.57 U mL−1, 0.27 A420/g. CHBE showed a titratable acidity of 1.33% and pH 3.73 post-storage, impeding microbial proliferation with the lowest counts (2.30–3.24 log CFU g−1). The microbial suitability of the NC group diminished after day 6, with an overall preference score of 1.00. Conversely, the CH and CHBE groups scored 3.15 and 4.56, highlighting the coatings’ effectiveness. Bergamot juice powder extract further enhanced this, mitigating browning and enhancing quality. Results reveal tailored coatings’ potential to extend shelf life, improve quality, and enhance fruit salads’ acceptability. This study underscores the importance of edible coatings in addressing preservation challenges, emphasizing their role in enhancing food quality and consumer acceptability. Incorporating edible coatings is pivotal in mitigating deterioration issues and ensuring the overall success of fresh-cut fruit products in the market. Full article
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17 pages, 4595 KiB  
Article
Physicochemical Characterisation of Polysaccharide Films with Embedded Bioactive Substances
by Shweta Gautam, Lubomir Lapcik, Barbora Lapcikova, David Repka and Lilianna Szyk-Warszyńska
Foods 2023, 12(24), 4454; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12244454 - 12 Dec 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 988
Abstract
In this study, sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMCNa) bioactive films, crosslinked with citric acid (CA), were prepared and comprehensively examined for their suitability in various applications, focusing on food packaging. The films displayed favourable properties, including appropriate thickness, transparency, and moisture content, essential for [...] Read more.
In this study, sodium carboxymethyl cellulose (CMCNa) bioactive films, crosslinked with citric acid (CA), were prepared and comprehensively examined for their suitability in various applications, focusing on food packaging. The films displayed favourable properties, including appropriate thickness, transparency, and moisture content, essential for packaging purposes. Moreover, the films exhibited excellent moisture absorption rate and barrier properties, attributed to the high concentration of CMCNa and the inclusion of a CA. These films presented no significant effect of crosslinking and bioactive components on their mechanical strength, as evidenced by tensile strength and elongation at break values. Thermal stability was demonstrated in the distinct weight loss events at different temperature ranges, with crosslinking contributing to slightly enhanced thermal performance. Furthermore, the films showed varying antioxidant activity levels, influenced by temperature and the solubility of the films in different media, indicating their potential for diverse applications. Overall, these bioactive films showed promise as versatile materials with desirable properties for food packaging and related applications, where the controlled release of bioactive components is advantageous for enhancing the shelf life and safety of food products. These findings contribute to the growing research in biodegradable and functional food packaging materials. Full article
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15 pages, 4484 KiB  
Article
Influence of Auricularia cornea Polysaccharide Coating on the Stability and Antioxidant Activity of Liposomes Ginsenoside Rh2
by Minghui Wang, Qinyang Li, Shuang Li, Yunzhu Zhao, Xintong Jiang, Sihan He and Junmei Liu
Foods 2023, 12(21), 3946; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12213946 - 29 Oct 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1260
Abstract
Liposomes (Lip) are microstructures containing lipid and aqueous phases for encapsulation and delivery of bioactivators. In this study, Ginsenoside Rh2 liposomes (Rh2−Lip) were prepared by a thin-film hydrated ultrasonic binding method. But they are not stable during storage. In addition, Rh2−Lip was wrapped [...] Read more.
Liposomes (Lip) are microstructures containing lipid and aqueous phases for encapsulation and delivery of bioactivators. In this study, Ginsenoside Rh2 liposomes (Rh2−Lip) were prepared by a thin-film hydrated ultrasonic binding method. But they are not stable during storage. In addition, Rh2−Lip was wrapped with Auricultural cornea polysaccharide (ACP) and Chitosan (CS) as coating materials to improve stability. CS coating was used as a positive control. The particle sizes determined by dynamic light scattering (DLS) showed 183 ± 5.52 nm for liposomes, 197 ± 6.7 nm for Auricultural cornea polysaccharide coated liposomes (ACP−Rh2−Lip), and 198 ± 3.5 nm for Chitosan coated liposomes (CS−Rh2−Lip). The polydispersity index (PDI) of all liposomes was less than 0.3. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that ACP and CS were successfully encapsulated on the liposome surface. In vitro simulations of digestive stability in the gastrointestinal tract showed that ACP−Rh2−Lip and CS−Rh2−Lip were more stable in gastrointestinal fluids compared to Lip. The antioxidant experiment revealed that ACP−Rh2−Lip has greater antioxidant activity than Lip. The purpose of this study was to look into the effects of ACP−Rh2−Lip and to offer a reference for Ginsenoside Rh2 (Rh2) delivery. Full article
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