Recent Advances in Food Flavor and Sensory Attributes Analysis

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Physics and (Bio)Chemistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 May 2024) | Viewed by 4765

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Agricultural, Food and Environmental Sciences, Università Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy
Interests: food science and technology; food quality; food analysis; analytical food methods; food processing; gas/liquid-chromatography-mass spectrometry; aroma compounds; bioactive compounds; dairy products; food lipids; fatty acids; functional food; food waste; sustainability; novel foods; emerging technologies
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Guest Editor
Chemistry Interdisciplinary Project (ChIP), School of Pharmacy, University of Camerino, Via Madonna delle Carceri, 62032 Camerino, Italy
Interests: sustainability; functional food; food quality; analytical food methods; gas/liquid-chromatography-mass spectrometry; food processing; food technology; food chemistry; antioxidant activity; bioactive compounds; green-extraction methods
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Flavor fingerprint plays a key role in determining the acceptability of foods and beverages by the consumer. This is currently of great interest in the scientific food sector. The evaluation, in terms of the quantification, chemical identification, and sensory properties of raw materials and finished products, is, in fact, often at the center of research projects in the food sector. Instrumental analysis coupled with sensory analysis, as well as characterizing the food, allows for evaluating the impact of different processing technologies and the use of a new ingredient, etc.

Results obtained from this kind of research are widely applied in many fields including quality control, food marketing, food inspection, and traceability. Scientific articles published in the field of flavor science and sensory evaluation have contributed greatly to the development and growth of food science and technology worldwide. This Special Issue is intended to collect high-quality manuscripts on research related to instrumental flavor analysis and sensory evaluation for the characterization of food matrices.

Dr. Roberta Foligni
Dr. Cinzia Mannozzi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • food flavor
  • volatile compounds
  • sensory profile evaluation
  • GC–MS analysis
  • aroma chemical composition
  • flavor chemistry
  • traditional food
  • novel food
  • volatile fingerprint
  • emerging technologies

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

16 pages, 3003 KiB  
Article
Black Truffle Aroma Evaluation: SPME-GC-MS vs. Sensory Experts
by Eva Tejedor-Calvo, Sergi García-Barreda, Sergio Sánchez, María Ángeles Sanz and Pedro Marco
Foods 2024, 13(6), 837; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13060837 - 9 Mar 2024
Viewed by 949
Abstract
Nowadays, the truffle aroma attribute is not included as a quality parameter in the current recommendation that explains the truffle quality (UNECE standard 53 FFV3) and establishes the truffle commercial categories. However, the aroma is the main reason why truffles are worldwide appreciated. [...] Read more.
Nowadays, the truffle aroma attribute is not included as a quality parameter in the current recommendation that explains the truffle quality (UNECE standard 53 FFV3) and establishes the truffle commercial categories. However, the aroma is the main reason why truffles are worldwide appreciated. Indeed, more than 30 aromatic molecules compose it, and this is the reason why the human evaluation and identification of these odorants, without previous training, is quite subjective. Analytical techniques such as gas chromatography techniques, however, can establish an aromatic profile and detect potential aromatic markers. In this study, 16 tasting experts were trained to make more objective the truffle aroma evaluation and odorants identification. For this, a comparison between solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (SPME-GC-MS) and sensory expert evaluation was carried out in six sessions during different harvesting times in the black truffle season (December, January, and February). Both techniques were able to separate truffles depending on the harvesting time. Also, a list of volatile organic compounds related to the aromatic attributes was reported. This information will help to provide a more objective T. melanosporum truffle sensory evaluation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Food Flavor and Sensory Attributes Analysis)
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16 pages, 1876 KiB  
Article
Electronic Prediction of Chemical Contaminants in Aroma of Brewed Roasted Coffee and Quantification of Acrylamide Levels
by Gema Cascos, Ismael Montero-Fernández, Jhunior Abrahan Marcía-Fuentes, Ricardo S. Aleman, Antonio Ruiz-Canales and Daniel Martín-Vertedor
Foods 2024, 13(5), 768; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13050768 - 1 Mar 2024
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1200
Abstract
The aim of this research was to apply an electronic device as indirect predictive technology to evaluate toxic chemical compounds in roasted espresso coffee. Fresh coffee beans were subjected to different thermal treatments and analyzed to determine volatile organic compounds, content of acrylamide [...] Read more.
The aim of this research was to apply an electronic device as indirect predictive technology to evaluate toxic chemical compounds in roasted espresso coffee. Fresh coffee beans were subjected to different thermal treatments and analyzed to determine volatile organic compounds, content of acrylamide and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, sensory characteristics and electronic nose data. In total, 70 different volatile compounds were detected and grouped into 15 chemical families. The greatest percentage of these compounds were furans, pyrazines, pyridines and aldehydes. The positive aroma detected had the intensity of coffee odor and a roasted aroma, whereas the negative aroma was related to a burnt smell. A linear relationship between the toxic substances and the sensory defect was established. A high sensory defect implied a lower content of acrylamide and a higher content of 5-hydroxymethylfurfural. Finally, electronic signals were also correlated with the sensory defect. This relationship allowed us to predict the presence of these contaminants in the roasted coffee beverage with an indirect method by using this electronic device. Thus, this device may be useful to indirectly evaluate the chemical contaminants in coffee beverages according to their sensory characteristics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Food Flavor and Sensory Attributes Analysis)
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13 pages, 1637 KiB  
Article
Chemistry behind Quality—Emission of Volatile Enantiomers from Mentha spp. Plant Tissue in Relationship to Odor Sensory Quality
by Jacek Łyczko, Anna Kiełtyka-Dadasiewicz, Hanán Issa-Issa, Mariusz Skrzyński, Renata Galek, Ángel A. Carbonell-Barrachina and Antoni Szumny
Foods 2023, 12(10), 2057; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods12102057 - 19 May 2023
Viewed by 1352
Abstract
The quality of food, considering increasing consumer demands and competition among producers, is a highly important issue. Quality concerns are also applicable to the odor quality of herbs and spices (HSs). Meanwhile, HSs commonly are graded based on their essential oils (EOs) content [...] Read more.
The quality of food, considering increasing consumer demands and competition among producers, is a highly important issue. Quality concerns are also applicable to the odor quality of herbs and spices (HSs). Meanwhile, HSs commonly are graded based on their essential oils (EOs) content and analysis; but does the instrumental analysis really provide general information about the HSs sensory quality? Three chemotypes of Mentha spp. were used in the present study. From samples diversified by convective drying at different temperatures, EOs were hydrodistillated and analyzed by enantioselective GC-MS; moreover, the source plant material’s volatile profile was analyzed by the HS-SPME technique. The instrumental analysis was confronted with the results of the sensory panel. Changes in enantiomeric composition were observed during the drying process, although no clear correlations or trends could be found for individual chiral components. Furthermore, even with significant differences in particular volatiles’ contribution to plants’ EOs and their volatile profiles, judges were not able to match the sample EOs and plant samples with sufficient effectiveness (~40%). Based on those results, we suggest that volatile enantiomeric distribution does not have an actual influence on odor quality and that the sensory analysis should not be replaced with instrumental analysis, which cannot predict general sensory quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Recent Advances in Food Flavor and Sensory Attributes Analysis)
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