Special Issue "Dry-Cured Meat Products: Impact of Processing on Proteolytic, Lipolytic and Oxidative Changes"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Engineering and Technology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 November 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Nives Marušić Radovčić
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Food Technology and Biotechnology, University of Zagreb, Pierottijeva 6, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: meat and meat products; meat quality; meat processing; aroma; physicochemical characteristics; sensory analysis; texture; lipid and protein oxidation; poultry and egg quality
Prof. Dr. Helga Medić
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Faculty of Food Technology and Biotechnology, University of Zagreb, Pierottijeva 6, 10000 Zagreb, Croatia
Interests: quality of meat and meat products; aroma; lipolysis; proteolysis; oxidation; poultry and egg quality
Dr. Leticia Mora
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CSIC, Instituto de Agroquímica y Tecnología de Alimentos, Avenida Agustin Escardino 7, 46980 Paterna, Valencia, Spain
Interests: meat; food chemistry; proteomics; by-products; bioactivity
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Dry curing is one of the oldest methods of meat conservation. Different procedures, types of cuts and shapes of hams are used in different regions and climates in different parts of the world. Dry-cured meat products are important meat products with good sensory properties due to their unique flavour. The processing of dry-cured meat products relies on the basic stages of salting, drying, and ripening. Additionally, many chemical and biochemical changes happen during the process of production (especially in the final phases: drying and ripening) with many enzymatic mechanisms involved. The control of these reactions is necessary for flavour formation but also for quality standardization. It has been scientifically established that the main biochemical reactions during the production of dry-cured meat products are proteolysis and lipolysis and current scientific interest is focused on the proteolysis and oxidation of proteins and their impact on the quality of the final product. Numerous factors arising from the technological process influence the intensity of proteolytic, lipolytic and oxidative processes.

This Special Issue aims to investigate the influence of proteolytic, lipolytic and oxidative changes on the texture, colour, flavour, and other quality parameters of the final product by monitoring changes of the proteins and lipids throughout the dry-cured meat products process. Additionally, innovative analytical methods in monitoring these changes are welcome.

Prof. Dr. Nives Marušić Radovčić
Prof. Dr. Helga Medić
Dr. Leticia Mora
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • dry-cured meat products
  • meat processing
  • meat quality
  • lipolysis
  • proteolysis
  • oxidative changes
  • aroma
  • sensory evaluation
  • biochemical and nutritional changes

Published Papers (1 paper)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Article
Influence of Muscle Type on Physicochemical Parameters, Lipolysis, Proteolysis, and Volatile Compounds throughout the Processing of Smoked Dry-Cured Ham
Foods 2021, 10(6), 1228; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10061228 - 28 May 2021
Viewed by 683
Abstract
The influence of muscle type (biceps femoris, BF and semimembranosus, SM) on physicochemical parameters, volatile compounds, and the extent of proteolysis and lipolysis during the manufacturing of smoked dry-cured ham was investigated. A total of fifty smoked hams were sampled: raw ham, after [...] Read more.
The influence of muscle type (biceps femoris, BF and semimembranosus, SM) on physicochemical parameters, volatile compounds, and the extent of proteolysis and lipolysis during the manufacturing of smoked dry-cured ham was investigated. A total of fifty smoked hams were sampled: raw ham, after salting, smoking, drying, and ripening. Almost all physicochemical parameters were affected by muscle type, manufacturing stage and their interactions. SM had lower water, ash, NaCl content, and water activity (aw), while fat and protein content were higher after ripening compared to BF. BF showed higher L*a*b* values compared to SM. The results of texture profile analysis showed that almost all analyzed parameters were influenced by muscle type and production stage. A total of 88 volatile compounds were identified, showing an increase in its number during processing: 31 volatile compounds were identified in raw ham and 72 after the ripening phase. Aldehydes and phenols were the predominant groups of compounds, followed by alcohols, ketones, aromatic hydrocarbons, aliphatic hydrocarbons, esters, and terpenes. Muscle type and production phase significantly affected lipid oxidation and the index of proteolysis: in SM, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) increased faster than in BF, while proteolysis had an opposite effect and was more pronounced in BF. Full article
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop