Special Issue "Consumer Psychology and Food Design"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Sensory and Consumer Sciences".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Nazimah Hamid
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Science, Auckland University of Technology, Private Bag 92006, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
Interests: consumer science; sensory evaluation; sensory analysis of foods; instrumental flavour analysis; sensory perception; food science; food chemistry; pulse electric field; high-pressure processing; non-thermal technologies; meat and seafood products
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Kevin Kantono
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Science, Auckland University of Technology, Private Bag 92006, Auckland 1142, New Zealand
Arla Foods Innovation Centre, Agro Food Park 19, Aarhus N 8200, Denmark
Interests: Food science; Consumer behaviour; Sensory evaluation; Crossmodal sensory interactions; Emotion measurements; Psychophysiology measurements; Food product design

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Background: Consumer psychology and food product design are inextricably linked as current food trends that dictate recent product innovations in terms of structure, composition, safety, and packaging of food are strongly influenced by consumer needs. Consumer needs play a big role when designing food products with added value. With increasing health awareness amongst consumers, there is currently more demand for functional foods that are either fortified to increase nutritional value, plant-based, minimally processed, and healthy for adults, children and the elderly. In addition, the consumer product experience in terms of aesthetics and emotional responses can also influence food product design.

Aim and Scope: This Special Issue invites researchers in the relevant field to submit original research and systematic reviews to expand knowledge in the field of product development, food product design, and consumer sensory perception and psychology.

History: Consumer-driven product development, which started in the early 1990s, recognised the importance of understanding consumers' current and future needs when developing new value-added food products. With increased globalisation, changes in consumers’ economic and social lives have greatly influenced food choice and behaviour. Hence, a deeper understanding of the role that consumer behaviour and psychology play in food product design is increasingly vital for food companies to be successful and thrive in current modern markets.

Cutting-Edge Research: Newly-developed technologies in food product development to address consumers’ concerns and needs. Food perception and multisensory aspects. Functional food development.

What kind of papers we are soliciting: Consumer-driven product development and optimisation; role of sensory perception, emotion, and consumer preferences in food product design; interdisciplinary papers in the area of culinary science, gastronomy, nutrition, business, and marketing that will also contribute to the growing body of knowledge in the area of consumer psychology and food product design.

Prof. Dr. Nazimah Hamid
Dr. Kevin Kantono
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • consumer psychology
  • consumer behavior
  • consumer trends
  • sensory quality and perception
  • food design
  • product development
  • food product optimisation

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Effect of Geographical Indication Information on Consumer Acceptability of Cooked Aromatic Rice
Foods 2020, 9(12), 1843; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9121843 - 11 Dec 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 630
Abstract
Geographical indication (GI) labeling is used to represent information about specific geographical origins of target products. This study aimed at determining the impact of GI information on sensory perception and acceptance of cooked aromatic rice samples. Ninety-nine participants evaluated cooked rice samples prepared [...] Read more.
Geographical indication (GI) labeling is used to represent information about specific geographical origins of target products. This study aimed at determining the impact of GI information on sensory perception and acceptance of cooked aromatic rice samples. Ninety-nine participants evaluated cooked rice samples prepared using each of three aromatic rice varieties both with and without being provided with GI information. Participants rated the acceptance and intensity of the cooked rice samples in terms of appearance, aroma, flavor, texture, and overall liking, and also reported how important the GI information was to them. The results showed that consumers rated the cooked rice samples higher in appearance and overall liking when provided with GI information. Interestingly, participants who valued “state-of-origin” information more highly exhibited increased hedonic ratings of cooked rice samples when provided with GI information, but not when no GI information was given. Participants provided with GI information rated flavor or sweetness intensities of cooked aromatic rice samples closer to just-about-right than those without such information. This study provides empirical evidence about how GI information modulates sensory perception and acceptance of cooked aromatic rice samples. The findings will help rice industry, farmers, and traders better employ GI labeling to increase consumer acceptability of their rice products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Consumer Psychology and Food Design)
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Article
Sensory and Physicochemical Characterization of Sourdough Bread Prepared with a Coconut Water Kefir Starter
Foods 2020, 9(9), 1165; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9091165 - 24 Aug 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1408
Abstract
There is a recognized need for formulating functional food products using selected lactic acid bacteria (LAB) starter cultures from various sources such as kefir, yoghurt or kombucha that have health benefits. The principle objective of this study was to investigate the use of [...] Read more.
There is a recognized need for formulating functional food products using selected lactic acid bacteria (LAB) starter cultures from various sources such as kefir, yoghurt or kombucha that have health benefits. The principle objective of this study was to investigate the use of a coconut water kefir-based fermentation starter culture using Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus plantarum to develop a sourdough bread. Check-all-that-apply (CATA) sensory profiling was used in this study to evaluate the sensory profile of sourdough breads that varied with culture type, culture concentrations, with and without added yeast, and with fermentation for 18 and 24 h. Based on correspondence analysis (CA) of the CATA results, bread samples with positive sensory attributes were chosen for further physicochemical analysis. Physicochemical analyses (texture, proximate composition, shelf life, carboxylic acid analysis and amino acid analysis) were carried out on breads formulated with starter culture concentrations of 8.30 log CFU/mL of L. fermentum, 4.90 log CFU/mL of L. fermentum and 9.60 log CFU/mL of L. plantarum, each fermented for 24 h without baker’s yeast. The bread sample that was formulated with a coconut water kefir (CWK) starter culture containing 9.60 log CFU/mL of L. plantarum, without dry yeast and fermented for 24 h, had significantly higher values for almost all amino acids and a lower protein content compared to samples formulated using CWK cultures containing 8.30 log CFU/mL of L. fermentum and 4.90 log CFU/mL of L. fermentum, both without dry yeast and fermented for 24 h. The bread sample formulated with CWK starter culture containing 9.60 log CFU/mL of L. plantarum, without dry yeast and fermented for 24 h, also produced significant quantities of organic acids (pyruvic acid, acetic acid, lactic acid and succinic acid). These changes in the physicochemical properties can improve overall bread quality in terms of flavor, shelf life, texture and nutritional value. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Consumer Psychology and Food Design)
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Review

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Review
Multisensory Flavour Perception: Blending, Mixing, Fusion, and Pairing within and between the Senses
Foods 2020, 9(4), 407; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9040407 - 01 Apr 2020
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 2078
Abstract
This review summarizes the various outcomes that may occur when two or more elements are paired in the context of flavour perception. In the first part, I review the literature concerning what happens when flavours, ingredients, and/or culinary techniques are deliberately combined in [...] Read more.
This review summarizes the various outcomes that may occur when two or more elements are paired in the context of flavour perception. In the first part, I review the literature concerning what happens when flavours, ingredients, and/or culinary techniques are deliberately combined in a dish, drink, or food product. Sometimes the result is fusion but, if one is not careful, the result can equally well be confusion instead. In fact, blending, mixing, fusion, and flavour pairing all provide relevant examples of how the elements in a carefully-crafted multi-element tasting experience may be combined. While the aim is sometimes to obscure the relative contributions of the various elements to the mix (as in the case of blending), at other times, consumers/tasters are explicitly encouraged to contemplate/perceive the nature of the relationship between the contributing elements instead (e.g., as in the case of flavour pairing). There has been a noticeable surge in both popular and commercial interest in fusion foods and flavour pairing in recent years, and various of the ‘rules’ that have been put forward to help explain the successful combination of the elements in such food and/or beverage experiences are discussed. In the second part of the review, I examine the pairing of flavour stimuli with music/soundscapes, in the emerging field of ‘sonic seasoning’. I suggest that the various perceptual pairing principles/outcomes identified when flavours are paired deliberately can also be meaningfully extended to provide a coherent framework when it comes to categorizing the ways in which what we hear can influence our flavour experiences, both in terms of the sensory-discriminative and hedonic response. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Consumer Psychology and Food Design)
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Review
Magic on the Menu: Where Are All the Magical Food and Beverage Experiences?
Foods 2020, 9(3), 257; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9030257 - 28 Feb 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1795
Abstract
Magic and dining have long been popular forms of entertainment. What is more, both involve some kind of transformation, and yet while the more theatrical aspects of dining have grown in popularity in recent decades, there is a surprising paucity of magical food [...] Read more.
Magic and dining have long been popular forms of entertainment. What is more, both involve some kind of transformation, and yet while the more theatrical aspects of dining have grown in popularity in recent decades, there is a surprising paucity of magical food and beverage experiences out there. In this article, we trace the historical appearance of food and drink and culinary items in the performance of magic. We also review some of the more magical elements of food design that have appeared on menus in bars and restaurants in recent years. We introduce the edible lightbulb dish from the menu at Kitchen Theory Chef’s Table and link it to the stage magic of Derren Brown. We also discuss some of the reasons as to why magical food experiences might be rare in the context of dining. In so doing, our hope is to highlight an intriguing area for future research and innovation. Along the way, we identify some possible candidate approaches for the introduction of edible magic onto the menu in the context of modernist cuisine. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Consumer Psychology and Food Design)
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