Microbiological Studies on Wine Fermentation

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Biotechnology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 August 2024 | Viewed by 774

Special Issue Editors


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Department of Food Science and Technology, University of the Peloponnese, 24100 Kalamata, Greece
Interests: physicochemical aspects in food biotechnology; food quality and safety; the kinetic study of alcoholic fermentation; physical chemistry of interfaces
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Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, University of Patras, 26504 Patras, Greece
Interests: physicochemical aspects of food processing; the development of new chromatographic techniques for determining physicochemical quantities; physicochemical studies of alcoholic fermentation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, Agricultural University of Athens, 11855 Athens, Greece
Interests: lactic acid bacteria; probiotics; functional foods; dairy products; meat products; bacterial genetics; genomics; metagenomics; bacteriocins
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The pivotal role of microorganisms in wine fermentation is well-established in enological science, as these microorganisms are key determinants of the wine's flavor, aroma, and overall quality. This complex biochemical process involves the orchestrated interaction of a diverse microbial ecosystem, predominantly yeast and bacteria. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a yeast species, is the primary agent in alcoholic fermentation, catalyzing the conversion of grape sugars into ethanol and carbon dioxide. Beyond this, non-saccharomyces yeasts contribute significantly to developing the wine’s secondary aroma compounds, adding layers of complexity to the flavor profile. Concurrently, lactic acid bacteria play a crucial role in malolactic fermentation and may also contribute to the sensory characteristics of the wine, either positively or negatively. A thorough understanding of these microbiological dynamics and interactions is critical for enologists and winemakers, enabling them to manipulate fermentation conditions and optimize the sensory attributes and quality of the final product.

This Special Issue delves into the cutting-edge realm of omics technologies to characterize the microbiota pivotal to wine fermentation. We invite contributions that utilize genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, and metabolomic analyses to elucidate the technological characteristics of both saccharomyces cerevisiae and non-saccharomyces yeasts, as well as lactic acid bacteria. Articles exploring the dynamic interactions and metabolic pathways of these microorganisms through advanced omics techniques are highly valued. Additionally, we encourage submissions that present the kinetic studies of wine fermentation, employing different yeast strains to understand strain-specific fermentation profiles. This Special Issue aims to bridge traditional enological practices with modern omics-based insights, offering a more profound understanding of the microbiological aspects of wine fermentation.

Prof. Dr. John Kapolos
Dr. Athanasia Koliadima
Dr. Konstantinos Papadimitriou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • wine
  • saccharomyces cerevisiae
  • non-saccharomyces yeasts
  • wine-related Lactic acid bacteria
  • genomics
  • metagenomics
  • metabolomics
  • genetic modification
  • immobilization
  • secondary aroma compounds
  • technological characteristics

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

16 pages, 3010 KiB  
Article
Improving Muscat Hamburg Wine Quality with Innovative Fermentation Strategies Using Schizosaccharomyces pombe Derived from Fermented Grains of Sauce-Flavor Baijiu
by Xiaotong Lyu, Yifei Zhou, Furong Li, Meiyi Zhou, Chunhui Wei, Liangcai Lin, Xin Li and Cuiying Zhang
Foods 2024, 13(11), 1648; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13111648 - 24 May 2024
Viewed by 543
Abstract
This study investigates innovative approaches to improve the quality and aroma characteristics of Muscat Hamburg wine production by substituting the conventional Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast with an efficient fermentation strain of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The typical use of S. cerevisiae in Muscat Hamburg wine [...] Read more.
This study investigates innovative approaches to improve the quality and aroma characteristics of Muscat Hamburg wine production by substituting the conventional Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast with an efficient fermentation strain of Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The typical use of S. cerevisiae in Muscat Hamburg wine often leads to uniformity and prolonged processing times, requiring subsequent malolactic fermentation to degrade excessive malic acid. The study advocates for the replacement of S. cerevisiae with a specific S. pombe strain, Sp-410, isolated from the fermented grains of sauce-flavor Baijiu, a Chinese spirit. Muscat Hamburg wine fermented with the S. pombe strain demonstrates decreased malic acid levels, offering a potential alternative to malolactic fermentation. However, exclusive S. pombe fermentation may result in an overproduction of acetic acid metabolites, leading to a monotonous taste. In response, the study proposes a mixed fermentation approach, combining the S. pombe strain with a Saccharomyces uvarum strain and a non-Saccharomyces yeast, Torulaspora delbrueckii. The optimized mixed fermentation strategies (M:SP+TD and M60SP+TD) involve specific proportions and intervals of inoculation, aiming to enhance the quality and aroma complexity of Muscat Hamburg wine. In conclusion, this research contributes to advancing the production of high-quality Muscat Hamburg wines, utilizing S. pombe as the primary yeast strain and implementing mixed fermentation methodologies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microbiological Studies on Wine Fermentation)
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