Impacts of Climate Change on Aquatic Animals: Advances in Cellular, Immunological Physiological, Genetic and Genomic Approaches

A special issue of Fishes (ISSN 2410-3888). This special issue belongs to the section "Environment and Climate Change".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 October 2024 | Viewed by 1974

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Fisheries & Aquaculture, University of Patras, Mesolonghi, Greece
Interests: animal physiology; cell physiology; comparative physiology; environmental physiology; cell signaling; climate change; bioindicators
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Department of Animal Science, Faculty of Agricultural Sciences, University of Western Macedonia, 531 00 Florina, Greece
Interests: molecular genetics, population biology, molecular identification; animal pathogens; molecular physiology; symbiotic microbiota; molecular markers; phylogeny; gene expression; animal science
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School of Biology, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki, Greece
Interests: reproductiοn; nutrition; ecophysiology; functional genomics; molecular endocrinology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The term climatic change refers to any shift in climatic conditions over a certain time period, either on account of natural causes or due to anthropogenic impacts.

Although climate change research has developed greatly, responses by marine ecosystems to the aggregated effects of climate change and other anthropogenic activities remain poorly understood. However, these ecosystems are particularly vulnerable to climate change effects, and thus their inhabitants are influenced by the increased seawater temperature and parallel increase in dissolved CO2. Therefore, understanding the translation of water temperature into cellular and organismal signals which constrain organismal processes is of great importance for evaluating and predicting the impacts of global warming on aquatic organisms.

Original manuscripts, including both research papers and review articles, that address all biological aspects of marine and freshwater animal species related to climate change are invited to be considered for publication in this Special Issue. Aquatic animals may refer to both wild and cultured invertebrates and vertebrates such as bivalves, decapods, arthropods, fish, and mammals. More particularly, the aims of this Special Issue include, but are not restricted to, the evaluation of the effects of global warming, seawater temperature increase, and ocean acidification on all levels of biological organization of aquatic animals by estimating their molecular, cellular, immunological, physiological, and behavioral responses.

Dr. Konstantinos Feidantsis
Dr. Ioannis A. Giantsis
Dr. Efthimia Antonopoulou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fishes is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • climate change
  • heat stress
  • oxidative stress
  • population biology
  • gene expression
  • molecular response
  • freshwater animals
  • marine biology
  • aquaculture

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

31 pages, 9522 KiB  
Article
Hepatic Transcriptomic Responsiveness of Polar Cod, Boreogadus saida, to Ocean Acidification and Warming
by Sarah Kempf, Heidrun Sigrid Windisch, Kristina Lore Kunz, Hans-Otto Pörtner, Felix Christopher Mark and Magnus Lucassen
Fishes 2024, 9(7), 271; https://doi.org/10.3390/fishes9070271 - 10 Jul 2024
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Abstract
Background: This study was part of a larger comprehensive project (BIOACID) addressing the physiological resilience of Polar cod, Boreogadus saida, to ocean acidification and global warming and aimed to unravel underlying molecular mechanisms of the observed physiological responses. Methods: Fish were acclimated [...] Read more.
Background: This study was part of a larger comprehensive project (BIOACID) addressing the physiological resilience of Polar cod, Boreogadus saida, to ocean acidification and global warming and aimed to unravel underlying molecular mechanisms of the observed physiological responses. Methods: Fish were acclimated long-term to three CO2 concentrations comprising control conditions (390 ppm) and two projected climate scenarios (780 ppm and 1170 ppm). Each CO2 treatment was combined with four temperatures: 0, 3, 6, and 8 °C. Here, we focused on the hepatic transcriptomic profiles from these previously physiologically characterized fish. Results: Generally, we did not detect signs of a classical stress response. Consistent with functional observations, warming induced much stronger molecular responses compared to elevated PCO2, but an interaction between both factors existed to some extent. Gene ontology analysis revealed a strong response in lipid, amino acid, and protein metabolism. With increasing temperature, we observed a shift away from lipid metabolism, while carbohydrate metabolic pathways remained stable. Conclusions: Although we found Polar cod to be quite resilient to ocean acidification, temperature will remain a critical parameter for this valuable Arctic keystone species, and the question remains as to whether the observed acclimation strategies can be implemented in its natural habitat, especially when food supply is limited. Full article
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14 pages, 2995 KiB  
Article
Antioxidant Defense of Mytilus galloprovincialis Mussels Induced by Marine Heatwaves in Correlation with Marteilia Pathogen Presence
by Athanasios Lattos, Dimitrios K. Papadopoulos, Konstantinos Feidantsis, Ioannis A. Giantsis, Ioannis Georgoulis, Dimitrios Karagiannis and Basile Michaelidis
Fishes 2023, 8(8), 408; https://doi.org/10.3390/fishes8080408 - 8 Aug 2023
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1060
Abstract
Background: The effects of climate change negatively affect marine bivalves’ health. Lately, the intensity of marine heatwaves poses serious threats to the aquatic environment setting of high-risk bivalve farming. Since temperature increases can jeopardize bivalves’ immunity response, pathogen infection becomes more evident. Reactive [...] Read more.
Background: The effects of climate change negatively affect marine bivalves’ health. Lately, the intensity of marine heatwaves poses serious threats to the aquatic environment setting of high-risk bivalve farming. Since temperature increases can jeopardize bivalves’ immunity response, pathogen infection becomes more evident. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, increased during the process of phagocytosis, is confronted by the animals’ antioxidant defense system. However, apart from pathogenic infections, antioxidant defense responses are also induced by seawater temperature increases; Methods: To enlighten the antioxidant status of Mytilus galloprovincialis originating from mortality events enhanced by intense heatwaves in Thermaikos Gulf, northern Greece, along with Marteilia refringens infection, we examined the expression of genes related to antioxidant defense (catalase, CuSOD and mt10) along with the lipid peroxidation levels and activity levels of antioxidant enzymes (catalase, SOD and glutathione reductase); Results: Our results exhibited increased levels of all these biomarkers. This increase was intensified in the Marteilia infected individuals; Conclusions: Our findings shed light on the oxidative and antioxidant status of farmed mussels led to mortality in the context of Marteilia infection. The latter is augmented by the synergistic effect of heatwaves causing a significant increase in oxidative damage and subsequent antioxidant defense. Full article
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