Special Issue "Fermented Foods and Gut Microbiome"

A special issue of Fermentation (ISSN 2311-5637). This special issue belongs to the section "Fermentation for Food and Beverages".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2020) | Viewed by 3213

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Anthoula A. Argyri
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Institute of Technology of Agricultural Products, Hellenic Agricultural Organization-DEMETER, Sof. Venizelou 1, 14123 Lycovrissi Attica, Greece
Interests: food microbiology; functional foods; probiotics; natural antimicrobials; novel technologies in food processing
Dr. Chrysoula Tassou
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Hellenic Agricultural Organisation-DEMETER Institute of Technology of Agricultural Products Sofokli Venizelou 1, Lycovrissi, 14123 Attica, Greece
Interests: food fermentation; olive, meat, dairy, wine fermentation; food safety; probiotics; functional foods; food processing; high pressure; metabolomics
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fermented foods are the result of the metabolic activity of a complex microbiota, consisting of the indigenous microorganisms naturally associated with the raw materials, and/or selected microorganisms (bacteria, yeasts) inoculated as starter cultures. Traditional fermented foods represent valuable cultural heritage in most regions, and harbor a vast genetic potential of valuable strains. The study of the microbial ecology of naturally fermented foods and the identification of microbial diversity using metagenomic approaches are of interest. Metabolomic and proteomic approaches are also important to study the physiology and genetics of microorganisms.

Starter cultures (single or mixed) are essential for a complete fermentation and a final product of certain quality. The functional—including probiotic—properties of these cultures give an added nutritional value to the fermented foods, enhancing the beneficial role of fermented foods in human health by affecting the gut microbiota. The interactions between ingested fermented food and intestinal microbiota, and their correlations to metabolomics profiles and health, represent an important perspective.

We invite researchers to contribute original research articles related but not restricted to:

  • Microbial diversity and the beneficial role of naturally fermented foods in human health;
  • Development of new cultures with functional properties to be applied in food production;
  • Functional foods and their effect on intestinal microbiota;
  • Microbial interactions between food and gut microbiota;
  • Physiology and genetics of functional microorganisms—metabolomic and proteomic approaches.

Dr. Anthoula A. Argyri
Dr. Chrysoula Tassou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fermentation is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fermented foods
  • functional foods
  • gut microbiome
  • microbial diversity
  • starter cultures
  • probiotics
  • metabolomics
  • health

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Manuka Honey with Varying Levels of Active Manuka Factor (AMF) Ratings as an Anaerobic Fermentation Substrate for Limosilactobacillus reuteri DPC16
Fermentation 2021, 7(3), 128; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation7030128 - 26 Jul 2021
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Abstract
Manuka honey is known for its strong antibacterial effect against pathogens but can promote probiotic growth in certain conditions. In a two-factor ANOVA study, AMFTM Manuka honey (Active Manuka Factor: 05+, 10+, 15+ and 20+) [...] Read more.
Manuka honey is known for its strong antibacterial effect against pathogens but can promote probiotic growth in certain conditions. In a two-factor ANOVA study, AMFTM Manuka honey (Active Manuka Factor: 05+, 10+, 15+ and 20+) was utilised as a substrate for probiotic Limosilactobacillus reuteri DPC16 in an anaerobic batch fermenter for 36 h. The biomass growth in MRS broth was noticeably higher with AMF Manuka honey than invert syrup and control samples without any additional sweetener source. The pH value was significantly lowered below 4.0 only in the AMF samples with the formation of lactic acid as the major metabolite. Other beneficial short-chain fatty acids (SCFA), such as acetic, succinic, and propionic acids, produced during the fermentation, along with the honey saccharides, were quantified by two-dimensional (2-D) nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. A significantly (p < 0.05) high biomass in AMF 20+ sample after 36 h, can partly be attributed to the high total sugar and oligosaccharide content in the honey. Importantly, however, no statistically significant difference was observed in the recorded major fermentation outcomes for the different AMF levels. The results, nevertheless, indicate the potential prebiotic efficacy of Manuka honey as a fermentation substrate for the lactobacilli probiotic strain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fermented Foods and Gut Microbiome)
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Review

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Review
Wine and Non-Dairy Fermented Beverages: A Novel Source of Pro- and Prebiotics
Fermentation 2020, 6(4), 113; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation6040113 - 20 Nov 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1806
Abstract
Probiotics and prebiotics are microbiota-management instruments for improving human health once they may be beneficial for maintaining a healthy community of gut microbiota and bowel function. Probiotic’s main target is the gut, via the gastrointestinal tract, although direct application to other body zones [...] Read more.
Probiotics and prebiotics are microbiota-management instruments for improving human health once they may be beneficial for maintaining a healthy community of gut microbiota and bowel function. Probiotic’s main target is the gut, via the gastrointestinal tract, although direct application to other body zones such as the vaginal tract, the oral cavity, and skin have been studied. The major source of probiotics is fermented dairy products, however, currently, there is a need for novel and non-dairy probiotics, due to the increasing number of lactose-intolerant persons in the world population, tied with the adverse effect of cholesterol contained in fermented dairy foods as well as the increasing number of strict vegetarians. In this review, we describe gut-derived effects in humans of possible microorganisms isolated from wine, such as Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts and bacteria, and other non-dairy fermented beverages. Those microorganisms can be grown and consumed as recommended probiotics, moreover, wine, and other beverages may also be a source of prebiotics such as polyphenols. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Fermented Foods and Gut Microbiome)
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