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Topical Collection "Advanced Energy Materials and Research"

A topical collection in Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This collection belongs to the section "D1: Advanced Energy Materials".

Editors

Dr. Prodip K. Das
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Engineering, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK
Interests: fuel cells; Li-ion batteries; multiphysics modeling and simulation; convection
Prof. Dr. Nigel D. Browning
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, School of Engineering & School of Physical Sciences, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GQ, UK
Interests: atomic resolution and operando scanning transmission electron microscopy studies of energy storage materials and processes; multimodal characterization of new battery systems for a circular economy
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Sara Walker
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Reader in Energy, Director of The Centre of Energy, School of Engineering, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne NE1 7RU, UK
Interests: whole energy systems, low-energy and low-carbon buildings, building-scale renewables, small scale energy storage, and electric vehicle charging/discharging load profiles
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Topical Collection Information

Dear Colleagues,

We are inviting submissions to a Special Issue of Energies on “Advanced Energy Materials and Research”.

The increasing energy demand and consumption due to growing global population and the critical relationship between energy, environment, and sustainability lead to novel discoveries and advancements in the field of energy materials in search of alternative resources as well as recycling and reuse of energy materials. Energy materials are making groundbreaking developments in the science of materials innovation and production. The transformation of conventional fossil fuel to renewable and sustainable energy sources due to the geophysical and social stress results in the development of advanced energy materials to support emerging technologies. The emerging materials for energy associated application include but are not limited to photovoltaic, batteries, fuel cells, nanostructured materials, and light sources.

In this Special Issue of Energies, original research articles or reviews on topics related to advanced energy materials and their characterization are welcome. Topics of interest for publication include but are not limited to:

  • Advanced energy materials
  • Recycling and reuse of energy materials
  • Solar energy materials
  • Hydrogen energy and fuel cell technology
  • Semiconductor materials
  • Batteries and energy materials
  • Nanotechnology and energy materials
  • Advanced nanomaterials
  • Energy harvesting materials
  • Bio-materials for energy production
  • Carbon materials in energy
  • Biomaterials and surface science engineering
  • Solid electrolytes
  • Advanced graphene materials
  • Electric, hybrid, and fuel-cell vehicles
  • Polymer materials
  • Mining, metallurgy, and materials science

Electrical, optical and magnetic materials

Dr. Prodip K. Das
Prof. Nigel D. Browning
Dr. Sara Walker
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the collection website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • solar energy
  • fuel cell
  • batteries
  • electrolytes
  • nanomaterials
  • polymers
  • semiconductor
  • graphene
  • biomaterials
  • recycling and reuse of energy materials

Published Papers (3 papers)

2021

Article
Green Concrete Based on Quaternary Binders with Significant Reduced of CO2 Emissions
Energies 2021, 14(15), 4558; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14154558 - 28 Jul 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 412
Abstract
The article presents studies of plain concretes prepared based on a quaternary binder containing various percentages of selected supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs). The possibilities of nanotechnology in concrete technology were also used. An additional important environmental goal of the proposed solution was to [...] Read more.
The article presents studies of plain concretes prepared based on a quaternary binder containing various percentages of selected supplementary cementitious materials (SCMs). The possibilities of nanotechnology in concrete technology were also used. An additional important environmental goal of the proposed solution was to create the possibility of reducing CO2 emissions and the carbon footprint generated during the production of ordinary Portland cement (OPC). As the main substitute for the OPC, siliceous fly ash (FA) was used. Moreover, silica fume (SF) and nanosilica (nS) were also used. During examinations, the main mechanical properties of composites, i.e., compressive strength (fcm) and splitting tensile strength (fctm), were assessed. The microstructure of these materials was also analyzed using a scanning electron microscope (SEM). In addition to the experimental research, simulations of the possible reduction of CO2 emissions to the atmosphere, as a result of the proposed solutions, were also carried out. It was found that the quaternary concrete is characterized by a well-developed structure and has high values of mechanical parameters. Furthermore, the use of green concrete based on quaternary binders enables a significant reduction in CO2 emissions. Therefore quaternary green concrete containing SCMs could be a useful alternative to plain concretes covering both the technical and environmental aspects. The present study indicates that quaternary binders can perform better than OPC as far as mechanical properties and microstructures are concerned. Therefore they can be used during the production of durable concretes used to perform structures in traditional and industrial construction. Full article
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Article
Heat of Decomposition and Fire Retardant Behavior of Polyimide-Graphene Nanocomposites
Energies 2021, 14(13), 3948; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14133948 - 01 Jul 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 518
Abstract
Polyimide is a high-performance engineering polymer with outstanding thermomechanical properties. Because of its inherent fire-retardant properties, polyimide nanocomposite is an excellent material for packaging electronic devices, and it is an attractive electrode material for batteries and supercapacitors. The fire-retardant behavior of polyimide can [...] Read more.
Polyimide is a high-performance engineering polymer with outstanding thermomechanical properties. Because of its inherent fire-retardant properties, polyimide nanocomposite is an excellent material for packaging electronic devices, and it is an attractive electrode material for batteries and supercapacitors. The fire-retardant behavior of polyimide can be remarkably improved when polyimide is reinforced with multilayered graphene sheets. Differential scanning calorimetry and thermogravimetric analysis were used to study the heat of decomposition and gravimetric decomposition rate, respectively, of polyimide-graphene nanocomposites. Polyimide/graphene nanocomposites containing 10, 20, 30, 40, and 50 wt.% of multilayered graphene sheets were heated at a rate of 10 and 30 °C/min in air and in nitrogen atmosphere, respectively. The rate of mass loss was found to remarkably decrease by up to 198% for nanocomposites containing 50 wt.% of graphene. The enthalpy change resulting from the decomposition of the imide ring was found to decrease by 1166% in nitrogen atmosphere, indicating the outstanding heat-shielding properties of multilayered graphene sheets due to their high thermal conductivity. Graphene sheets are believed to form a continuous carbonaceous char layer that protects the imide ring against decomposition, hence decreasing initial mass loss. The enthalpy changes due to combustion, obtained from differential scanning calorimetry, were used to calculate the theoretical heat release rates, a major parameter in the determination of flammability of polymers. The heat release rate decreased by 62% for composites containing 10 wt.% of graphene compared to the neat polyimide matrix. Polyimide has a relatively lower heat of combustion as compared with graphene. However, graphene significantly decreases the mass loss rates of polyimide. The combined interaction of graphene and polyimide led to an overall decrease in the heat release rate. It is noted that both mass loss rate and heat of combustion are important factors that contribute to the rate of heat released. Full article
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Graphical abstract

Review
Advanced and Emerging Negative Electrodes for Li-Ion Capacitors: Pragmatism vs. Performance
Energies 2021, 14(11), 3010; https://doi.org/10.3390/en14113010 - 22 May 2021
Viewed by 963
Abstract
Li-ion capacitors (LICs) are designed to achieve high power and energy densities using a carbon-based material as a positive electrode coupled with a negative electrode often adopted from Li-ion batteries. However, such adoption cannot be direct and requires additional materials optimization. Furthermore, for [...] Read more.
Li-ion capacitors (LICs) are designed to achieve high power and energy densities using a carbon-based material as a positive electrode coupled with a negative electrode often adopted from Li-ion batteries. However, such adoption cannot be direct and requires additional materials optimization. Furthermore, for the desired device’s performance, a proper design of the electrodes is necessary to balance the different charge storage mechanisms. The negative electrode with an intercalation or alloying active material must provide the high rate performance and long-term cycling ability necessary for LIC functionality—a primary challenge for the design of these energy-storage devices. In addition, the search for new active materials must also consider the need for environmentally friendly chemistry and the sustainable availability of key elements. With these factors in mind, this review evaluates advanced and emerging materials used as high-rate anodes in LICs from the perspective of their practical implementation. Full article
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