Engaged Student Learning and Inclusive Teaching Practices in Higher Education Chemistry

A special issue of Education Sciences (ISSN 2227-7102). This special issue belongs to the section "Curriculum and Instruction".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2024 | Viewed by 1360

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, University of California, Riverside, Riverside, CA, USA
Interests: undergraduate education; active learning; flipped classroom environments; conceptual learning; growth mindset practices

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Guest Editor
Department of Chemistry, West Virginia University, Morgantown, VA, USA
Interests: undergraduate students; chemistry education research; attitudes towards STEM; learner-centered; inclusive learning environments

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

We invite you to submit an article to a Special Issue of Education Sciences that will be devoted to chemistry education. As you all know, the retention of students in STEM degree pathways continues to be a problem in higher education, particularly for students from minority groups. Addressing this problem is of utmost importance in recruiting and retaining high-quality individuals for the 21st century STEM workforce, and perhaps, more importantly, helping all students who have a passion for STEM to achieve their career goals. It is in this context that this Special Issue of Education Sciences will have the theme “Engaged Student Learning and Inclusive Teaching in Higher Education Chemistry.”

We hope this will attract articles from both chemistry education researchers and classroom practitioners who engage in the scholarship of teaching and learning, but ultimately the goal is to publish reports that will help chemistry instructors from all backgrounds make their classes more inclusive. This, in turn, will hopefully help instructors to improve equity gaps and improve interest and retention in STEM pathways for all students.

We thank you in advance for considering this request to submit an article to this Special Issue.

Most sincerely

Prof. Dr. Jack F. Eichler
Dr. Oluwatobi Odeleye
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a double-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Education Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • active learning
  • inclusive teaching
  • contextualized learning
  • growth mindset
  • undergraduate
  • chemistry

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

12 pages, 6129 KiB  
Review
Using Simulations and Screencasts in Online Preclass Activities to Support Student Building of Mental Models
by Deborah G. Herrington and Ryan D. Sweeder
Educ. Sci. 2024, 14(2), 115; https://doi.org/10.3390/educsci14020115 - 23 Jan 2024
Viewed by 1072
Abstract
As online learning and flipped classes become more important in chemistry instruction, the development of learning materials that can be used to support students’ independent learning of conceptual chemistry content is critical. This paper summarizes the key findings from an eight-year investigation of [...] Read more.
As online learning and flipped classes become more important in chemistry instruction, the development of learning materials that can be used to support students’ independent learning of conceptual chemistry content is critical. This paper summarizes the key findings from an eight-year investigation of effective practices for using simulations in preclass introductions to core chemistry concepts with a focus on supporting students’ development of particulate-level models. Student learning gains for six core chemistry concepts were compared for students’ independent use of a simulation using scaffolded instructions versus students’ viewing a screencast of instructors modeling the use of the simulation to answer a series of questions. Though both approaches resulted in student learning gains and provided a solid foundation for subsequent instruction, the screencast approach provided additional benefits. These included avoiding potential simulation limitations and the ability to add instructional content to support student learning. Additionally, studying many iterations of assignments for several different topics yielded an assignment design framework that provides guidelines for instructors looking to create or use simulation-based preclass activities in the classroom to support student learning. Full article
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