Special Issue "Biomarkers in Neuropsychiatric Disorders"

A special issue of Diseases (ISSN 2079-9721). This special issue belongs to the section "Neuro-psychiatric Disorders".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Omar Cauli
Website SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Department of Nursing, University of Valencia, Valencia 46010, Spain
Interests: cogntive impairment; frailty syndrome; neurodevelopemntal disorders; depression; neuropathy; sleep; envirnomental factors; comorbidty; immune alterations; metabolic alterations; biomarkers
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Neuro-psychiatric disorders are an important cause of poor quality of life, disability, and  premature mortality. Globally, the burden of these disorders has increased substantially over the past 25 years, due of expanding population numbers and aging, despite substantial decreases in mortality rates. The pathophysiological bases of these disorders show continuous challenges, and different aspects within the same disorder appear quickly in the field of biomedical sciences. The complexity of these disorders needs  a constant update on biomarkers useful for diagnosing, for monitoring the efficicacy of tratments and interventions and to shed new lights on their pathophysiology.

This Special Issue wishes to shed new light on this exciting and insightful field of research from a multidisciplinary perspective. This Special Issue "Biomarkers in Neuropsychiatric Disorders" reflects the interplay between neurological and psychiatric sciences, with other health sciences at the leading edge of this growing research field, which intensively suggest new opportunities for improving diagnosis and care, or to prevent adverse outcomes. Welcome to contribute to this special issue.

Prof. Dr. Omar Cauli
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diseases is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Prognostic factors
  • Proteome
  • Microbiome
  • Molecular alterations genetic alteration
  • Morphology
  • Biochemical markers

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Hepatitis C Virus Infection Increases Fatigue in Health Care Workers
Diseases 2020, 8(4), 37; https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases8040037 - 15 Oct 2020
Abstract
Fatigue is a common state associated with a weakening or depletion of one’s physical and mental resources, that leads to the inability to continue the individual functioning at a normal level of activity. Frequently, fatigue represents a response to infections, inflammation and autoimmune [...] Read more.
Fatigue is a common state associated with a weakening or depletion of one’s physical and mental resources, that leads to the inability to continue the individual functioning at a normal level of activity. Frequently, fatigue represents a response to infections, inflammation and autoimmune diseases. The scope of this study was to evaluate the fatigue in healthcare workers with and without hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. Mental, physical and severity fatigue were evaluated through Krupp, Wessely and Powell fatigue scale. Anti-HCV antibodies, HCV RNA and HCV genotypes were also measured. Physical, mental and severity fatigue were higher in healthcare workers with HCV infection than the healthcare workers without infection (p < 0.01). Our data showed a direct link between fatigue and HCV infection in healthcare workers. Further studies are needed to evaluate HCV antiviral treatments on fatigue severity and on quality of life in healthcare workers Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomarkers in Neuropsychiatric Disorders)
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Open AccessArticle
Are Steroid Hormones Dysregulated in Autistic Girls?
Diseases 2020, 8(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases8010006 - 14 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Evidence of altered cholesterol and steroid hormones in autism is increasing. However, as boys are more often affected, evidence mainly relates to autistic males, whereas evidence for affected autistic girls is sparse. Therefore, a comprehensive gas chromatography mass spectrometry-based steroid hormone metabolite analysis [...] Read more.
Evidence of altered cholesterol and steroid hormones in autism is increasing. However, as boys are more often affected, evidence mainly relates to autistic males, whereas evidence for affected autistic girls is sparse. Therefore, a comprehensive gas chromatography mass spectrometry-based steroid hormone metabolite analysis was conducted from autistic girls. Results show increased levels of several steroid hormones, especially in the class of androgens in autistic girls such as testosterone or androstenediol. The increase of the majority of steroid hormones in autistic girls is probably best explained multifactorially by a higher substrate provision in line with the previously developed cholesterol hypothesis of autism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomarkers in Neuropsychiatric Disorders)
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Open AccessArticle
One Single Nucleotide Polymorphism of the TRPM2 Channel Gene Identified as a Risk Factor in Bipolar Disorder Associates With Autism Spectrum Disorder in a Japanese Population
Diseases 2020, 8(1), 4; https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases8010004 - 07 Feb 2020
Abstract
The transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) is a non-specific cation channel, resulting in Ca2+ influx at warm temperatures from 34 °C to 47 °C, thus including the body temperature range in mammals. TRPM2 channels are activated by β-NAD+, ADP-ribose [...] Read more.
The transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2) is a non-specific cation channel, resulting in Ca2+ influx at warm temperatures from 34 °C to 47 °C, thus including the body temperature range in mammals. TRPM2 channels are activated by β-NAD+, ADP-ribose (ADPR), cyclic ADPR, and 2′-deoxyadenosine 5′-diphosphoribose. It has been shown that TRPM2 cation channels and CD38, a type II or type III transmembrane protein with ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity, simultaneously play a role in heat-sensitive and NAD+ metabolite-dependent intracellular free Ca2+ concentration increases in hypothalamic oxytocinergic neurons. Subsequently, oxytocin (OT) is released to the brain. Impairment of OT release may induce social amnesia, one of the core symptoms of autism spectrum disorder (ASD). The risk of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and variants of TRPM2 have been reported in bipolar disorder, but not in ASD. Therefore, it is reasonable to examine whether SNPs or haplotypes in TRPM2 are associated with ASD. Here, we report a case-control study with 147 ASD patients and 150 unselected volunteers at Kanazawa University Hospital in Japan. The sequence-specific primer-polymerase chain reaction method together with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy was applied. Of 14 SNPs examined, one SNP (rs933151) displayed a significant p-value (OR = 0.1798, 95% CI = 0.039, 0.83; Fisher’s exact test; p = 0.0196). The present research data suggest that rs93315, identified as a risk factor for bipolar disorder, is a possible association factor for ASD. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomarkers in Neuropsychiatric Disorders)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Depression and Obesity: Analysis of Common Biomarkers
Diseases 2020, 8(2), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases8020023 - 14 Jun 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Depression and obesity are very common pathologies. Both cause significant problems of both morbidity and mortality and have decisive impacts not only on the health and well-being of patients, but also on socioeconomic and health expenditure aspects. Many epidemiological studies, clinical studies and [...] Read more.
Depression and obesity are very common pathologies. Both cause significant problems of both morbidity and mortality and have decisive impacts not only on the health and well-being of patients, but also on socioeconomic and health expenditure aspects. Many epidemiological studies, clinical studies and meta-analyses support the association between mood disorders and obesity in relationships to different conditions such as the severity of depression, the severity of obesity, gender, socioeconomic status, genetic susceptibility, environmental influences and adverse experiences of childhood. Currently, both depression and obesity are considered pathologies with a high-inflammatory impact; it is believed that several overlapping factors, such as the activation of the cortico-adrenal axis, the exaggerated and prolonged response of the innate immune system and proinflammatory cytokines to stress factors and pathogens—as well as alterations of the intestinal microbiota which promote intestinal permeability—can favor the expression of an increasingly proinflammatory phenotype that can be considered a key and common phenomenon between these two widespread pathologies. The purpose of this literature review is to evaluate the common and interacting mechanisms between depression and obesity. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomarkers in Neuropsychiatric Disorders)
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Open AccessReview
Effects of Physical Activity on Brain Energy Biomarkers in Alzheimer’s Diseases
Diseases 2020, 8(2), 18; https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases8020018 - 08 Jun 2020
Abstract
The prevalence of dementia has substantially increased worldwide. Currently, there is no cure for dementia or Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and care for affected patients is financially and psychologically costly. Of late, more attention has been given to preventive interventions—in particular, physical activity/exercise. In [...] Read more.
The prevalence of dementia has substantially increased worldwide. Currently, there is no cure for dementia or Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and care for affected patients is financially and psychologically costly. Of late, more attention has been given to preventive interventions—in particular, physical activity/exercise. In this review, examine the risk factors associated with AD and the effects physical activity may play in the prevention of the degenerative process of this disease, loss of memory and cognitive performance in the elderly. To date, research has shown that physical activity, especially aerobic exercise, has a protective effect on cognitive function and memory in the elderly and Alzheimer’s patients. In comparison with aerobic exercise, several strength training studies have also shown positive effects, and the rare studies that compare the two different modalities show no difference. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biomarkers in Neuropsychiatric Disorders)
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