Special Issue "Psychophysiological Responses to Physical Activity, Exercise and/or Nutrition Interventions in Overweight and Obese Individuals"

A special issue of Diseases (ISSN 2079-9721).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2023 | Viewed by 1618

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Alexios Batrakoulis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Physical Education and Sport Sciences, University of Thessaly, Karies, 42100 Trikala, Greece
Interests: physical activity; clinical exercise physiology; strength and conditioning; high-intensity interval training; health and fitness trends; exercise and obesity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity is a major global public health issue. Physical activity and exercise, as well as positive eating habits, promote beneficial physiological and psychological responses in overweight and obese individuals. Thus, studies must be undertaken that explore the effectiveness of physical activity or structured exercise, alone or combined with nutritional interventions, on body composition, physical fitness, cardiometabolic health and mental health in overweight and obese individuals of all ages. Considering the great methodological diversity among exercise and/or nutrition protocols in the literature, robust evidence is required to identify which exercise types, with or without a prescribed diet, can induce positive changes in health, fitness and well-being indicators among individuals of unhealthy weight. The current Special Issue aims to highlight evidence for use in practice and to provide valuable information that might improve an array of psychophysiological parameters. In this Special Issue, we welcome original research, case reports, study protocols, short communications, brief reviews, systematic reviews and meta-analyses on physical activity, exercise and/or nutrition and:

  • Anthropometric characteristics;
  • Body composition;
  • Glucose metabolism;
  • Lipid metabolism;
  • Blood pressure;
  • Physical fitness;
  • Exercise behavioral regulation;
  • Enjoyment;
  • Affective valence;
  • Quality of life;
  • Mood state;
  • Depression;
  • Anxiety and stress;
  • Eating habits.

Dr. Alexios Batrakoulis
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diseases is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • overweight
  • obesity
  • physical activity
  • exercise
  • physiological responses
  • psychological responses

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
The Effects of Greek Orthodox Christian Fasting during Holy Week on Body Composition and Cardiometabolic Parameters in Overweight Adults
Diseases 2022, 10(4), 120; https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases10040120 - 05 Dec 2022
Viewed by 664
Abstract
This study investigated whether Greek Orthodox Christian fasting during Holy Week can change body composition and cardiometabolic parameters in overweight individuals, and whether these changes are maintained one week after fasting cessation (FC). Body composition and physiological and biochemical parameters were measured before, [...] Read more.
This study investigated whether Greek Orthodox Christian fasting during Holy Week can change body composition and cardiometabolic parameters in overweight individuals, and whether these changes are maintained one week after fasting cessation (FC). Body composition and physiological and biochemical parameters were measured before, immediately after (n = 23) and one week after FC (subgroup of n = 10). Fasting resulted in decreased body weight, waist circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, body mass index and total body fat, as well as blood glucose, total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Nutrition analysis showed a decreased protein and saturated fat intake during fasting. FC (n = 10) resulted in a decreased carbohydrate intake and increased protein and cholesterol intake compared to fasting. Fasting resulted in decreased blood glucose, total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels but returned to pre-fasting levels after FC. Greek Orthodox Christian fasting during Holy Week is beneficial for body composition and some aspects of cardiometabolic health. However, these favourable changes are not maintained one week following fasting. Full article

Other

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Opinion
Role of Mind–Body Fitness in Obesity
Diseases 2023, 11(1), 1; https://doi.org/10.3390/diseases11010001 - 21 Dec 2022
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Abstract
Various mind–body fitness modalities such as Pilates, yoga, Tai Chi, and Qigong have become an accepted part of the physical activity, exercise, and leisure sector, serving several populations eligible for meditative movement activities. However, no robust evidence is present in the current literature [...] Read more.
Various mind–body fitness modalities such as Pilates, yoga, Tai Chi, and Qigong have become an accepted part of the physical activity, exercise, and leisure sector, serving several populations eligible for meditative movement activities. However, no robust evidence is present in the current literature supporting the efficacy of these meditative movement activities on health, fitness, and well-being markers among obese adults. Interestingly, the feasibility and safety of mind–body fitness programs in this cohort are still questionable. However, the limited available data show the beneficial role of such alternative exercise options in improving numerous physical fitness and cardiometabolic health-related indicators. The major role of mind–body fitness in obese individuals is to promote muscle control, body functionality, flexibility, and balance while reducing physical limitations, chronic pain, and stress through sessions integrating body postures, efficient breathing patterns, meditation, and relaxation. Such a bodily movement-based approach may be associated with increased physical performance and improved cardiometabolic as well as mental health. However, data on anthropometric characteristics, body composition and cardiovascular disease risk factors modification are somewhat equivocal. Future studies are needed to investigate a wider spectrum of physical fitness and cardiometabolic health parameters, since obese people are likely to demonstrate poor functional capacity, impaired glucose control, lipid disorder, and abnormal blood pressure levels. Full article
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