Special Issue "Biosensors-Based Diagnostics"

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418). This special issue belongs to the section "Point-of-Care Diagnostics and Devices".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (5 September 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Evangelyn C. Alocilja
Website
Guest Editor
Nano-Biosensors Lab, Department of Biosystems and Agricultural Engineering Michigan State University, 524 S. Shaw Lane, Room 115, Farrall Agricultural Engineering Hall, East Lansing, MI 48824-1323, USA
Interests: nano-enabled biosensing, nanoparticles; nanowires, elecrochemical sensing approaches; infectious diseases; global health; food/water safety; biodefense; product integrity
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biosensors are devices for detecting the presence, and oftentimes the concentration, of an analyte using an analyte-specific biological receptor that is intimately connected to a signal transducer and signal reader. Signal is generated when the analyte and receptor specifically interact, and the signal is finally reported by a reader. Since their inception, biosensors have played a major role in various forms of diagnosis, from infectious diseases to cancer to chronic ailments. The advantages of biosensors over classical or conventional methods include point-of-care utility, reduced size, rapid results, high sensitivity and specificity, affordability, accessibility, simplicity of operation, potential for multiplex analysis, and adaptability with other devices. This Special Issue on “Biosensors-Based Diagnostics” will cover all aspects of biosensor devices (biological receptors, signal transducers, and signal readers) and their diagnostic applications, such as for infectious diseases, pathogen detection, antimicrobial resistance, biomarker monitoring, and other related areas of concern.

Prof. Dr. Evangelyn Alocilja
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diagnostics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • biological receptors
  • transducers
  • diseases
  • biomarkers

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Nanoparticle-Based Biosensing Assay for Universally Accessible Low-Cost TB Detection with Comparable Sensitivity as Culture
Diagnostics 2019, 9(4), 222; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics9040222 - 13 Dec 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death globally, surpassing HIV. Furthermore, multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant TB have become global public health threats. Care of TB patients starts with quality, accessible, and affordable diagnosis. The study presents a novel technique called nanoparticle-based colorimetric [...] Read more.
Tuberculosis (TB) is the leading cause of death globally, surpassing HIV. Furthermore, multidrug-resistant and extensively drug-resistant TB have become global public health threats. Care of TB patients starts with quality, accessible, and affordable diagnosis. The study presents a novel technique called nanoparticle-based colorimetric biosensing assay (NCBA) based on the principles of magnetically activated cell enrichment. A total of 1108 sputum samples were subjected to sputum smear microscopy (SSM), NCBA, and standard culture. SSM and NCBA were completed in 20 min; culture was completed in 8 weeks. Results show that NCBA has matching sensitivity of 100.0% and specificity of 99.7% compared to the gold standard culture method at a cost of $0.50/test based on Peruvian conditions. Sputum smear microscopy has 63.87% sensitivity compared to culture. NCBA has the potential of being used in local health clinics as it only requires a microscope that is widely available in many rural areas. Because NCBA could detect low levels of bacterial load comparable to culture, it could be used for rapid and early TB-onset detection. The gain in time is critical as TB is airborne and highly infectious, minimizing contact exposure. Early detection could lead to early treatment, while the patient’s immune system is still high. The low cost makes NCBA affordable and accessible to those who need them the most. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors-Based Diagnostics)
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Open AccessArticle
Visual Detection of Dengue-1 RNA Using Gold Nanoparticle-Based Lateral Flow Biosensor
Diagnostics 2019, 9(3), 74; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics9030074 - 11 Jul 2019
Cited by 6
Abstract
Dengue is a rapidly spreading mosquito-borne viral disease. Early diagnosis is important for clinical screening, medical management, and disease surveillance. The objective of this study was to develop a colorimetric lateral flow biosensor (LFB) for the visual detection of dengue-1 RNA using dextrin-capped [...] Read more.
Dengue is a rapidly spreading mosquito-borne viral disease. Early diagnosis is important for clinical screening, medical management, and disease surveillance. The objective of this study was to develop a colorimetric lateral flow biosensor (LFB) for the visual detection of dengue-1 RNA using dextrin-capped gold nanoparticle (AuNP) as label. The detection was based on nucleic acid sandwich-type hybridization among AuNP-labeled DNA reporter probe, dengue-1 target RNA, and dengue-1 specific DNA capture probe immobilized on the nitrocellulose membrane. Positive test generated a red test line on the LFB strip, which enabled visual detection. The optimized biosensor has a cut-off value of 0.01 µM using synthetic dengue-1 target. Proof-of-concept application of the biosensor detected dengue-1 virus in pooled human sera with a cut-off value of 1.2 × 104 pfu/mL. The extracted viral RNA, when coupled with nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA), was detected on the LFB in 20 min. This study first demonstrates the applicability of dextrin-capped AuNP as label for lateral flow assay. The biosensor being developed provides a promising diagnostic platform for early detection of dengue infection in high-risk resource-limited areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors-Based Diagnostics)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Screen-Printed Electrodes (SPE) for In Vitro Diagnostic Purpose
Diagnostics 2020, 10(8), 517; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10080517 - 26 Jul 2020
Abstract
Due to rapidly spreading infectious diseases and the high incidence of other diseases such as cancer or metabolic syndrome, there is a continuous need for the development of rapid and accurate diagnosis methods. Screen-printed electrodes-based biosensors have been reported to offer reliable results, [...] Read more.
Due to rapidly spreading infectious diseases and the high incidence of other diseases such as cancer or metabolic syndrome, there is a continuous need for the development of rapid and accurate diagnosis methods. Screen-printed electrodes-based biosensors have been reported to offer reliable results, with high sensitivity and selectivity and, in some cases, low detection limits. There are a series of materials (carbon, gold, platinum, etc.) used for the manufacturing of working electrodes. Each version comes with advantages, as well as challenges for their functionalization. Thus, the aim is to review the most promising biosensors developed using screen-printed electrodes for the detection/quantification of proteins, biomarkers, or pathogenic microorganisms. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors-Based Diagnostics)
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Open AccessReview
Sensor-as-a-Service: Convergence of Sensor Analytic Point Solutions (SNAPS) and Pay-A-Penny-Per-Use (PAPPU) Paradigm as a Catalyst for Democratization of Healthcare in Underserved Communities
Diagnostics 2020, 10(1), 22; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics10010022 - 01 Jan 2020
Cited by 2
Abstract
In this manuscript, we discuss relevant socioeconomic factors for developing and implementing sensor analytic point solutions (SNAPS) as point-of-care tools to serve impoverished communities. The distinct economic, environmental, cultural, and ethical paradigms that affect economically disadvantaged users add complexity to the process of [...] Read more.
In this manuscript, we discuss relevant socioeconomic factors for developing and implementing sensor analytic point solutions (SNAPS) as point-of-care tools to serve impoverished communities. The distinct economic, environmental, cultural, and ethical paradigms that affect economically disadvantaged users add complexity to the process of technology development and deployment beyond the science and engineering issues. We begin by contextualizing the environmental burden of disease in select low-income regions around the world, including environmental hazards at work, home, and the broader community environment, where SNAPS may be helpful in the prevention and mitigation of human exposure to harmful biological vectors and chemical agents. We offer examples of SNAPS designed for economically disadvantaged users, specifically for supporting decision-making in cases of tuberculosis (TB) infection and mercury exposure. We follow-up by discussing the economic challenges that are involved in the phased implementation of diagnostic tools in low-income markets and describe a micropayment-based systems-as-a-service approach (pay-a-penny-per-use—PAPPU), which may be catalytic for the adoption of low-end, low-margin, low-research, and the development SNAPS. Finally, we provide some insights into the social and ethical considerations for the assimilation of SNAPS to improve health outcomes in marginalized communities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biosensors-Based Diagnostics)
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