Special Issue "Cardiovascular Diseases: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Management—For the Up-to-Date Practitioner"

A special issue of Diagnostics (ISSN 2075-4418). This special issue belongs to the section "Pathology and Molecular Diagnostics".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2021).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Attila Frigy
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Internal Medicine IV, University of Medicine, Pharmacy, Science and Technology, “George Emil Palade” of Targu Mures, 540139 Târgu Mureș, Romania
Interests: hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; cardiac imaging; echocardiography; MRI; computed tomography; invasive imaging; diagnosis; therapy; risk stratification; prognosis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Cardiovascular diseases are still increasingly prevalent, and often represent a major challenge for the practitioner facing real-life patients. Despite the recent and important progress made in better understanding and managing heart diseases, we are far from reaching definitive answers for everyday clinical problems. The scope, the principal idea behind the Special Issue, is to provide relevant, new information concerning the diagnosis and management of cardiovascular diseases, useful for daily practice and based on the most recent, available data. In this regard, the Issue seeks to collate articles which give a comprehensive, up-to-date presentation of clinical aspects related to frequently encountered or emerging cardiovascular pathologies, with an impact on improving everyday cardiac care.

Dr. Attila Frigy
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Diagnostics is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Hypertension
  • Heart failure
  • Atrial fibrillation
  • Diagnosis
  • Treatment

Published Papers (6 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

Article
Association between Cardiologist Consultation and Mortality of Stable Patients with Elevated Cardiac Troponin at Admission
Diagnostics 2021, 11(12), 2229; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics11122229 - 29 Nov 2021
Viewed by 161
Abstract
Elevated cardiac troponin (cTn) showed associations with mortality even in stable patients, but management has not been established. We aimed to investigate whether consultation to cardiologists could reduce mortality of stable patients with cTn elevation at admission. We identified 1329 patients with elevated [...] Read more.
Elevated cardiac troponin (cTn) showed associations with mortality even in stable patients, but management has not been established. We aimed to investigate whether consultation to cardiologists could reduce mortality of stable patients with cTn elevation at admission. We identified 1329 patients with elevated cTn level at hospitalization from outpatient clinic to any department other than cardiology or cardiac surgery between April 2010 and December 2018. The patients were divided into two groups according to cardiologist consultation at admission. For primary outcome, mortality during one year was compared in the crude and propensity-score-matched populations. In 1329 patients, 397 (29.9%) were consulted to cardiologists and 932 (70.1%) were not. Mortality during the first year was significantly lower in patients consulted to cardiologists compared with those who were not (9.8% vs. 14.2%; hazard ratio (HR), 0.50; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.35–0.72; p < 0.001). After propensity-score matching, 324 patients were in the cardiologist consultation group and 560 patients were in the no cardiologist consultation group. One-year mortality was consistently lower in the cardiologist consultation group (10.5% vs. 14.6%; HR, 0.58; 95% CI, 0.39–0.86; p = 0.01). Cardiologist consultation may be associated with lower mortality in stable patients with cTn elevation at admission. Further studies are needed to identify effective management strategies for stable patients with elevated cTn. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Serum Osteoprotegerin and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness Are Related to High Arterial Stiffness in Heart Failure with Reduced Ejection Fraction
Diagnostics 2021, 11(5), 764; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics11050764 - 24 Apr 2021
Viewed by 602
Abstract
Arterial stiffness (AS) is a complex vascular phenomenon with consequences for central hemodynamics and left-ventricular performance. Circulating biomarkers have been associated with AS; however, their value in heart failure is poorly characterized. Our aim was to evaluate the clinical and biomarker correlates of [...] Read more.
Arterial stiffness (AS) is a complex vascular phenomenon with consequences for central hemodynamics and left-ventricular performance. Circulating biomarkers have been associated with AS; however, their value in heart failure is poorly characterized. Our aim was to evaluate the clinical and biomarker correlates of AS in the setting of heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF). In 78 hospitalized, hemodynamically stable patients (20 women, 58 men, mean age 65.8 ± 1.41 years) with HFrEF, AS was measured using aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV). Serum OPG, RANKL, sclerostin, and DKK-1 were determined, and the relationships between the clinical variables, vascular-calcification-related biomarkers, and PWV were evaluated by correlation analysis and linear and logistic regression models. OPG and the OPG/RANKL ratio were significantly higher in the group of patients (n = 37, 47.4%) with increased PWV (>10 m/s). PWV was positively correlated with age, left-ventricular ejection fraction, and carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT), and negatively correlated with the glomerular filtration rate. OPG and cIMT were significantly associated with PWV in the logistic regression models when adjusted for hypertension, EF, and the presence of atherosclerotic manifestations. Elevated serum OPG, together with cIMT, were significantly related to increased AS in the setting of HFrEF. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Sex Difference in the Risk of Dementia in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation
Diagnostics 2021, 11(5), 760; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics11050760 - 23 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 610
Abstract
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is one of the risk factors for dementia. Female sex is an inconsistent risk factor for dementia after adjusting for age in the general population, and there lacks research on its impact in developing dementia in patients with AF. This [...] Read more.
Atrial fibrillation (AF) is one of the risk factors for dementia. Female sex is an inconsistent risk factor for dementia after adjusting for age in the general population, and there lacks research on its impact in developing dementia in patients with AF. This paper aims to investigate whether female sex is a risk factor for dementia in AF patients. Data of patients with newly diagnosed AF between 2001–2013 were retrieved from Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database. Exclusion criteria were: patients with incomplete demographic data, age < 20 years, rheumatic heart disease, hyperthyroidism, past valvular heart surgery, and a history of dementia. Propensity score matching (PSM) between sexes was performed, including comorbidities, medications and index date stratified by age. The primary outcome was a new diagnosis of dementia at follow-up. A total of 117,517 men and 156,705 women were eligible for analysis. After 1:1 PSM, both 100,065 men and women (aged 72.5 ± 12.5 years) were included for analysis. Dementia risk varied with age in women compared with men. The difference was negligible for ≤55 years (sub distribution HR (SHR) = 0.89, 95% CI 0.73–1.07), but increased between 56–65 years (SHR = 1.13, 95% CI 1.02–1.25), 66–75 years (SHR = 1.14, 95% CI 1.09–1.20), 75–85 years (SHR = 1.11, 95% CI 1.07–1.15) and >85 years (SHR 1.10, 95% CI 1.04–1.16) for females. This study establishes that female sex increases the risk of developing dementia compared to male sex in AF patients aged >56 years. However, the impact of female sex on dementia in AF patients differs between dementia types. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Hyponatremia—Long-Term Prognostic Factor for Nonfatal Pulmonary Embolism
Diagnostics 2021, 11(2), 214; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics11020214 - 01 Feb 2021
Viewed by 485
Abstract
Over recent years, studies have shown that in patients with left-sided heart failure, arterial hypertension, and acute coronary syndrome, hyponatremia is a negative prognostic factor. In this context, there is raising interest in the association between hyponatremia and pulmonary embolism (PE). This retrospective [...] Read more.
Over recent years, studies have shown that in patients with left-sided heart failure, arterial hypertension, and acute coronary syndrome, hyponatremia is a negative prognostic factor. In this context, there is raising interest in the association between hyponatremia and pulmonary embolism (PE). This retrospective cohort study includes 404 consecutive patients with confirmed acute nonfatal pulmonary embolism divided into four groups according to their sodium fluctuation pattern. The primary outcome was all-cause mortality and determining the recurrence rate among patients with nonfatal PE using serum sodium levels as a continuous variable. Patients with acquired and persistent hyponatremia had a significantly higher rate of mortality rate than those in the normonatremia group (12.8% and 40.4%, OR- 7.206, CI: 2.383–21.791, p = 0.000 and OR-33.250, CI: 11.521–95.960, p = 0.000 vs. 2%, p < 0.001, respectively). Mean survival time decreases from 23.624 months (95% CI: (23.295–23.953)) in the normonatremia group to 16.426 months (95% CI: (13.17–19.134)) in the persistent hyponatremia group, statistically significant (p = 0.000). The mean survival time for all patients was 22.441 months (95% CI: (21.930–22.951)). The highest recurrence rate was recorded at 12 and 24 months in the acquired hyponatremia group (16.7% and 14.1%, respectively). Serum sodium determination is a simple and cost-effective approach in evaluating the short and long-term prognosis in patients with acute PE. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Altered Expression of Circadian Clock Genes in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation Is Associated with Atrial High-Rate Episodes and Left Atrial Remodeling
Diagnostics 2021, 11(1), 90; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics11010090 - 07 Jan 2021
Viewed by 922
Abstract
A prominent circadian variation is present in atrial fibrillation (AF) attacks that may be related to the expression of circadian clock genes. Little is known about the expression of circadian clock genes in AF. We prospectively enrolled 73 patients who had received pacemaker [...] Read more.
A prominent circadian variation is present in atrial fibrillation (AF) attacks that may be related to the expression of circadian clock genes. Little is known about the expression of circadian clock genes in AF. We prospectively enrolled 73 patients who had received pacemaker implantation, in order to define the burden of atrial high-rate episodes (AHREs) accurately. AF was diagnosed clinically in 43 (59%) patients (15 with persistent AF and 28 with paroxysmal AF). The expression levels of circadian clock genes of peripheral blood leukocytes were checked. There were more males and patients with a larger left atrial (LA) size and lower expression levels of BMAL1, CRY2, NR1D1, NR1D2, PER2, RORA, RORC, and TIM genes in persistent AF group than in other groups. There was a significant correlation between higher AHRE burden and larger LA size and between higher AHRE burden and decreased expression of circadian clock genes in patients with AF. LA volume and the expression of CRY1, NR1D1, and RORA are significantly associated with AHRE burden. However, the underlying mechanism needs to be elucidated in further studies. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research

Systematic Review
Influencing Cardiovascular Outcomes through Heart Rate Variability Modulation: A Systematic Review
Diagnostics 2021, 11(12), 2198; https://doi.org/10.3390/diagnostics11122198 - 25 Nov 2021
Viewed by 224
Abstract
Psychological stress is a well-established risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Heart rate variability (HRV)-biofeedback could significantly reduce stress levels and improve autonomic nervous system function and cardiovascular endpoints. We aimed to systematically review the literature to investigate the impact of HRV modulation [...] Read more.
Psychological stress is a well-established risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). Heart rate variability (HRV)-biofeedback could significantly reduce stress levels and improve autonomic nervous system function and cardiovascular endpoints. We aimed to systematically review the literature to investigate the impact of HRV modulation through HRV-biofeedback on clinical outcomes in patients with CVD. A literature search was performed in the following databases: MEDLINE (PubMed), Embase, and Cochrane from the inception until 1 October 2021. Patients in the HRV-biofeedback group had significantly lower rates of all-cause readmissions than patients who received psychological education (respectively, p = 0.028 and p = 0.001). Heart failure following HRV-biofeedback displayed an inverse association with stress and depression (respectively, p = 0.022 and p = 0.033). When stratified according to left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF), patients with LVEF ≥ 31% showed improved values of the 6 min walk test after HRV-biofeedback interventions (p = 0.05). A reduction in systolic and diastolic blood pressure associated with HRV-biofeedback was observed (p < 0.01) in pre-hypertensive patients. HRV-biofeedback had beneficial effects on different cardiovascular diseases documented in clinical trials, such as arterial hypertension, heart failure, and coronary artery disease. A standard breathing protocol should be applied in future studies to obtain equivalent results and outcomes. However, data regarding mortality in patients with coronary artery disease are scarce and need further research. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop