Special Issue "Advances in Implant Dentistry"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2016).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Bernhard Pommer
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Academy for Oral Implantology, Lazarettgasse 19/DG, 1090 Vienna, Austria
Interests: dental implants; bone augmentation; guided surgery
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

New knowledge is developing at a rapidly increasing rate in implant dentistry, as in other areas of medicine. The implementation of osseointegrated implants, initiated by Brånemark over 40 years ago, has, without doubt, revolutionized oral medicine. While early research on implant dentistry was primarily concerned with fixture survival, interests are nowadays also focused on simplification of surgical procedures and optimization of single-tooth implant esthetics. Survival rates reported in studies prior to the millennium increased from 93.5% to 97.1%, thereafter (Pjetursson et al. 2014 JOMI 29:S308) limiting the potential for further improvement. Progress is instead attempted by application of minimally invasive surgical techniques to reduce patient morbidity and optimize peri-implantitis treatment. This special issue "Advances in Implant Dentistry" aims to review the current state-of-the-art regarding novel surgical and prosthodontic techniques and may, at times, challenge established dogmas, i.e., opinions based more on belief than on evidence-based implant dentistry.

Bernhard Pommer, DDS, PhD
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • template-guided implant placement
  • minimally invasive techniques
  • short lengths and reduced implant diameter
  • novel bone grafting techniques
  • medically compromised patients
  • peri-implantitis treatment
  • immediate placement and restoration
  • transition from a failing dentition
  • CAD/CAM prosthetics
  • optical intraoral impressions

Published Papers (8 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review, Other

Editorial
Advances in Implant Dentistry—A Special Issue of Dentistry Journal
Dent. J. 2015, 3(4), 132; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj3040132 - 02 Nov 2015
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2278
Abstract
New knowledge is developing at a rapidly increasing rate in implant dentistry, as in other areas of medicine. [...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Implant Dentistry)

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review, Other

Article
Marginal Vertical Fit along the Implant-Abutment Interface: A Microscope Qualitative Analysis
Dent. J. 2016, 4(3), 31; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj4030031 - 06 Sep 2016
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2267
Abstract
The aim of this study was to qualitatively evaluate the marginal vertical fit along two different implant-abutment interfaces: (1) a standard abutment on an implant and (2) a computer-aided-design/computer-aided-machine (CAD/CAM) customized screw-retained crown on an implant. Four groups were compared: three customized screw-retained [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to qualitatively evaluate the marginal vertical fit along two different implant-abutment interfaces: (1) a standard abutment on an implant and (2) a computer-aided-design/computer-aided-machine (CAD/CAM) customized screw-retained crown on an implant. Four groups were compared: three customized screw-retained crowns with three different “tolerance” values (CAD-CAM 0, CAD-CAM +1, CAD-CAM −1) and a standard titanium abutment. Qualitative analysis was carried out using an optical microscope. Results showed a vertical gap significantly different from both CAD-CAM 0 and CAD-CAM −1, while no difference was found between standard abutment and CAD-CAM +1. The set tolerance in producing CAD/CAM screw-retained crowns plays a key role in the final fit. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Implant Dentistry)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
Fatigue of Dental Implants: Facts and Fallacies
Dent. J. 2016, 4(2), 16; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj4020016 - 24 May 2016
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 4029
Abstract
Dental implants experience rare yet problematic mechanical failures such as fracture that are caused, most often, by (time-dependent) metal fatigue. This paper surveys basic evidence about fatigue failure, its identification and the implant’s fatigue performance during service. We first discuss the concept of [...] Read more.
Dental implants experience rare yet problematic mechanical failures such as fracture that are caused, most often, by (time-dependent) metal fatigue. This paper surveys basic evidence about fatigue failure, its identification and the implant’s fatigue performance during service. We first discuss the concept of dental implant fatigue, starting with a review of basic concepts related to this failure mechanism. The identification of fatigue failures using scanning electron microscopy follows, to show that this stage is fairly well defined. We reiterate that fatigue failure is related to the implant design and its surface condition, together with the widely varying service conditions. The latter are shown to vary to an extent that precludes devising average or representative conditions. The statistical nature of the fatigue test results is emphasized throughout the survey to illustrate the complexity in evaluating the fatigue behavior of dental implants from a design perspective. Today’s fatigue testing of dental implants is limited to ISO 14801 standard requirements, which ensures certification but does not provide any insight for design purposes due to its limited requirements. We introduce and discuss the random spectrum loading procedure as an alternative to evaluate the implant’s performance under more realistic conditions. The concept is illustrated by random fatigue testing in 0.9% saline solution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Implant Dentistry)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
A Simplified Technique for Implant-Abutment Level Impression after Soft Tissue Adaptation around Provisional Restoration
Dent. J. 2016, 4(2), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj4020014 - 24 May 2016
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3673
Abstract
Impression techniques for implant restorations can be implant level or abutment level impressions with open tray or closed tray techniques. Conventional implant-abutment level impression techniques are predictable for maximizing esthetic outcomes. Restoration of the implant traditionally requires the use of the metal or [...] Read more.
Impression techniques for implant restorations can be implant level or abutment level impressions with open tray or closed tray techniques. Conventional implant-abutment level impression techniques are predictable for maximizing esthetic outcomes. Restoration of the implant traditionally requires the use of the metal or plastic impression copings, analogs, and laboratory components. Simplifying the dental implant restoration by reducing armamentarium through incorporating conventional techniques used daily for crowns and bridges will allow more general dentists to restore implants in their practices. The demonstrated technique is useful when modifications to implant abutments are required to correct the angulation of malpositioned implants. This technique utilizes conventional crown and bridge impression techniques. As an added benefit, it reduces costs by utilizing techniques used daily for crowns and bridges. The aim of this report is to describe a simplified conventional impression technique for custom abutments and modified prefabricated solid abutments for definitive restorations. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Implant Dentistry)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Editorial, Research, Other

Review
Immediate Implants: Clinical Guidelines for Esthetic Outcomes
Dent. J. 2016, 4(2), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj4020021 - 13 Jun 2016
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 2973
Abstract
Research has shown that tooth loss results in morphological changes in alveolar ridge that may influence the subsequent implant placement. Immediate implant placement was introduced as a possible means to limit bone resorption and reduce the number of surgical procedures following tooth extraction. [...] Read more.
Research has shown that tooth loss results in morphological changes in alveolar ridge that may influence the subsequent implant placement. Immediate implant placement was introduced as a possible means to limit bone resorption and reduce the number of surgical procedures following tooth extraction. Histological and clinical evidence from human clinical studies showing efficacy of immediate implants has come to light over the last decade or so. However, immediate implant placement is a challenging surgical procedure and requires proper case selection and surgical technique. Furthermore, there appears to be a lack of clinical guidelines for immediate implant placement case selection. Therefore, the aim of this mini-review is to analyze critical evidence from human studies in order to establish clinical guidelines which may help clinicians in case selection when considering immediate implant placement protocol. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Implant Dentistry)
Review
The Overall Survival, Complication-Free Survival, and Related Complications of Combined Tooth-Implant Fixed Partial Dentures: A Literature Review
Dent. J. 2016, 4(2), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj4020015 - 25 May 2016
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3401
Abstract
This paper reviews the literature regarding possible complications, complication-free survival, and overall survival of fixed dental prostheses that use both implants and natural teeth as abutments. The paper also provides clinical guidelines for treatment based on this literature review. An electronic search utilizing [...] Read more.
This paper reviews the literature regarding possible complications, complication-free survival, and overall survival of fixed dental prostheses that use both implants and natural teeth as abutments. The paper also provides clinical guidelines for treatment based on this literature review. An electronic search utilizing the MEDLINE, BIOSIS Citation Index, and Web of Science™ Core Collection databases was undertaken, and a review of the 25 selected texts studying 22 different patient cohorts was carried out. From a total of 1610 implants reviewed, 40 were lost (33 due to loss of integration and 7 due to fracture), whereas, out of a total of 1301 teeth, 38 were lost, of which 16 were due to fracture. Seventy-three cases of tooth intrusion were detected. From a total of 676 frameworks reviewed (metal n = 645, Zirconia n = 31), 7 fractured, while veneer material fracture occurred in 70 out of 672 bridges. Overall, 502 out of 531 tooth-implant fixed prostheses (TIPFs) remained functional, and 336 out of 439 prostheses showed no technical or biological complications and remained functional. Rigid TIFPs permanently cemented to teeth with sufficient coronal structure and with limited use of prosthetic attachments offer a good long-term treatment option to patients with good oral hygiene following sound implant placement. This mode of treatment should be used when free-standing implant-supported options may not be possible. Larger randomized control studies and other clinical studies comparing tooth-to-implant-connected treatment with other forms of treatment are needed to better understand the place of TIFP treatment in oral rehabilitation. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Implant Dentistry)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review
Hot Topics in Clinical Oral Implants Research: Recent Trends in Literature Coverage
Dent. J. 2016, 4(2), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj4020013 - 24 May 2016
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3562
Abstract
This systematic review looks at thematic trends in clinical research publications on dental implants. For this purpose, MEDLINE electronic searches as well as additional hand searches of six main journals in the field were conducted. A total of 2875 clinical studies published between [...] Read more.
This systematic review looks at thematic trends in clinical research publications on dental implants. For this purpose, MEDLINE electronic searches as well as additional hand searches of six main journals in the field were conducted. A total of 2875 clinical studies published between 2001 and 2012 met the inclusion criteria and were subjected to statistical analysis. Hot topics in dental implant literature included immediate loading (14.3%), bone substitutes (11.6%), cross-arch full bridges (8.0%), and immediate implant placement (7.5%). A significant increase in scientific interest for immediate loading (+6.3%, p = 0.001), platform switching (+2.9%, p = 0.001), guided implant surgery (+1.9%, p = 0.011), growth factors (p = 0.014, +1.4%), piezoelectric surgery (+1.3%, p = 0.015), and restorative materials (+0.7%, p = 0.011) was found. A declining scientific interest in onlay grafting (−0.3%, p = 0.042) was recorded. The findings regarding current clinical oral implants research tie in with better-informed consumers and increased patient demands. Our results demonstrate an increasing interest in techniques that avoid complicated procedures such as bone grafting and that reduce treatment duration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Implant Dentistry)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Case Report
Magnet-Retained Two-Mini-Implant Overdenture: Clinical and Mechanical Consideration
Dent. J. 2016, 4(4), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj4040035 - 10 Oct 2016
Viewed by 3568
Abstract
Two-implant overdentures have become the accepted treatment for restoring mandibular edentulism. The dimensions of regular implants sometimes limit their use, such as in the case of narrow ridges. Mini-implants with reduced diameters (less than 3.0 mm) enable insertion into narrow ridges. A magnet-retained [...] Read more.
Two-implant overdentures have become the accepted treatment for restoring mandibular edentulism. The dimensions of regular implants sometimes limit their use, such as in the case of narrow ridges. Mini-implants with reduced diameters (less than 3.0 mm) enable insertion into narrow ridges. A magnet-retained two-mini-implant overdenture system was developed and is described in this paper. Additionally, we describe a clinical mandibular procedure using the system and evaluate its biomechanical performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Implant Dentistry)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop