Special Issue "Current Concepts on Erosive Tooth Wear"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2017).

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. James Kit-hon Tsoi Website E-Mail
Dental Materials Science, Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, Sai Ying Pun, Hong Kong
Phone: +852-2859-0303
Fax: +852-2548-9464
Interests: nanocoating for dental biomaterials, anti-bacterial coating, process of clinical coating
Guest Editor
Prof. Chun Hung Chu Website E-Mail
Faculty of Dentistry, The University of Hong Kong, 3B26, Prince Philip Dental Hospital, 34 Hospital Road, Hong Kong, China
Interests: preventive dentistry; community dentistry; fluorides; dental caries

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recently, erosive tooth wear has become a great concern for clinicians and dental researchers because of its multi-factorial nature involving biological, chemical and behaviour factors, and can affect all age groups, with a high prevalence and of various severities. To combat this, different approaches are available based on extensive clinical and research experiences, which have cumulated a viable amount of knowledge. In this Special Issue, all review or research articles on erosive tooth wear are welcomed with the emphasis on, but not limited to, basic science, aetiology, diagnosis, clinical treatment, theory, mechanism, and multi-disciplinary approaches. The Special Issue is keen on providing a platform to record, exchange and share the scientific knowledge and evidence via the Dentistry, which is an open access journal, and aims at maintaining the most updated current concepts in erosive tooth wear.

Dr. James Kit Hon Tsoi
Prof. Chun-Hung Chu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • tooth wear
  • erosive
  • beverage
  • fluoride
  • acid
  • prevention

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Dentin Erosion: Method Validation and Efficacy of Fluoride Protection
Dent. J. 2017, 5(4), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj5040027 - 06 Oct 2017
Abstract
The aging population experiences more gingival recession and root exposure which increases the opportunity for dentin erosion. This study tested the use of transverse microradiography (TMR) methods to assess dentin erosion and the interaction between fluoride and citric acid on the amount of [...] Read more.
The aging population experiences more gingival recession and root exposure which increases the opportunity for dentin erosion. This study tested the use of transverse microradiography (TMR) methods to assess dentin erosion and the interaction between fluoride and citric acid on the amount of erosion in the dentin samples. In a 4 × 3 interaction experimental design, four fluoride concentrations (0.00, 25.0, 50.0, and 100.0 mg/L) and three citric acid concentrations (0.0, 0.25, and 1.00%) were combined to form 12 experimental solutions. Forty-eight dentin samples were placed in the experimental solutions for 1 and 4 h and the amount of surface lost was determined by TMR methods. The resolution of the TMR method was 0.9 μm per pixel with a 0.1% and a 5% confidence interval of ±4.2 μm. Dentin erosion increased with the concentration of citric acid and time, the erosion decreased when concentration of fluoride was increased. Effects due to fluoride and citric acid concentrations individually, and their interaction on the amount of erosion observed was statistically significant (p < 0.0001). This study found that TMR methods are appropriate and that 25.0 mg/L was the optimal fluoride concentration to protect dentin from a 1.00% citric acid challenge. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Concepts on Erosive Tooth Wear)
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Open AccessArticle
Erosive and Mechanical Tooth Wear in Viking Age Icelanders
Dent. J. 2017, 5(3), 24; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj5030024 - 29 Aug 2017
Abstract
(1) Background: The importance of the Icelandic Sagas as a source of information about diet habits in medieval Iceland, and possibly other Nordic countries, is obvious. Extensive tooth wear in archaeological material worldwide has revealed that the main cause of this wear is [...] Read more.
(1) Background: The importance of the Icelandic Sagas as a source of information about diet habits in medieval Iceland, and possibly other Nordic countries, is obvious. Extensive tooth wear in archaeological material worldwide has revealed that the main cause of this wear is believed to have been a coarse diet. Near the volcano Hekla, 66 skeletons dated from before 1104 were excavated, and 49 skulls could be evaluated for tooth wear. The purpose of this study was to determine the main causes of tooth wear in light of diet and beverage consumption described in the Sagas; (2) Materials and methods: Two methods were used to evaluate tooth wear and seven for age estimation; (3) Results: Extensive tooth wear was seen in all of the groups, increasing with age. The first molars had the highest score, with no difference between sexes. These had all the similarities seen in wear from a coarse diet, but also presented with characteristics that are seen in erosion in modern Icelanders, through consuming excessive amounts of soft drinks. According to the Sagas, acidic whey was a daily drink and was used for the preservation of food in Iceland, until fairly recently; (4) Conclusions: It is postulated that the consumption of acidic drinks and food, in addition to a coarse and rough diet, played a significant role in the dental wear seen in ancient Icelanders. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Concepts on Erosive Tooth Wear)
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Open AccessArticle
Paediatric Over-the-Counter (OTC) Oral Liquids Can Soften and Erode Enamel
Dent. J. 2017, 5(2), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj5020017 - 11 May 2017
Abstract
This study investigated the softening and erosive effects of various paediatric over-the-counter (OTC) oral liquids on deciduous teeth. Twenty sectioned and polished deciduous enamel blocks were ground on the buccal surface (2 × 2 mm2) and randomly divided into five groups, [...] Read more.
This study investigated the softening and erosive effects of various paediatric over-the-counter (OTC) oral liquids on deciduous teeth. Twenty sectioned and polished deciduous enamel blocks were ground on the buccal surface (2 × 2 mm2) and randomly divided into five groups, immersed into four commercially-available paediatric OTC oral liquids (two for paracetamol, both sugared; and two for chlorpheniramine, one sugared and one sugar-free), with deionized water as control. The pH of the oral liquids ranged from 2.50 to 5.77. Each block was immersed into the test or control groups for 15 s, rinsed with deionized water, and Vickers micro-hardness (n = 5) was measured. After twenty cycles of immersion and hardness measurements, Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) and Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectrometry (EDS) were used to evaluate the surface morphology and chemistry of the tooth blocks, respectively. The pH values of the liquids were also recorded. Rapidly descending trends in the micro-hardness ratios of the four test groups were observed that were statistically different from the control group (p < 0.001). EDS showed an increase of Ca/C ratio after drug immersion, whereas SEM showed an enamel loss in all the test groups. Paediatric OTC oral liquids could significantly soften the enamel and render them more susceptible to caries, such that the formulation of the oral liquids is the major factor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Concepts on Erosive Tooth Wear)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Dental Biofilm and Laboratory Microbial Culture Models for Cariology Research
Dent. J. 2017, 5(2), 21; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj5020021 - 19 Jun 2017
Cited by 4
Abstract
Dental caries form through a complex interaction over time among dental plaque, fermentable carbohydrate, and host factors (including teeth and saliva). As a key factor, dental plaque or biofilm substantially influence the characteristic of the carious lesions. Laboratory microbial culture models are often [...] Read more.
Dental caries form through a complex interaction over time among dental plaque, fermentable carbohydrate, and host factors (including teeth and saliva). As a key factor, dental plaque or biofilm substantially influence the characteristic of the carious lesions. Laboratory microbial culture models are often used because they provide a controllable and constant environment for cariology research. Moreover, they do not have ethical problems associated with clinical studies. The design of the microbial culture model varies from simple to sophisticated according to the purpose of the investigation. Each model is a compromise between the reality of the oral cavity and the simplification of the model. Researchers, however, can still obtain meaningful and useful results from the models they select. Laboratory microbial culture models can be categorized into a closed system and an open system. Models in the closed system have a finite supply of nutrients, and are also simple and cost-effective. Models in the open system enabled the supply of a fresh culture medium and the removal of metabolites and spent culture liquid simultaneously. They provide better regulation of the biofilm growth rate than the models in the closed system. This review paper gives an overview of the dental plaque biofilm and laboratory microbial culture models used for cariology research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Concepts on Erosive Tooth Wear)
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Open AccessReview
A Review of the Common Models Used in Mechanistic Studies on Demineralization-Remineralization for Cariology Research
Dent. J. 2017, 5(2), 20; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj5020020 - 18 Jun 2017
Cited by 7
Abstract
Mechanistic studies on demineralization-remineralization play a critical role in investigating caries pathogenicity, testing effects of new caries prevention methods, and developing new caries-preventing products. Simulating the cariogenic challenges in the mouth, various demineralization-remineralization models have been used for cariology research. This review aimed [...] Read more.
Mechanistic studies on demineralization-remineralization play a critical role in investigating caries pathogenicity, testing effects of new caries prevention methods, and developing new caries-preventing products. Simulating the cariogenic challenges in the mouth, various demineralization-remineralization models have been used for cariology research. This review aimed to provide an overview of the common mechanistic studies on demineralization-remineralization for cariology research in recent literature. Most mechanistic studies were in vitro studies (n = 294, 84%) among the 350 cariology studies indexed in the Web of Science from 2014 to 2016. Among these in vitro studies, most studies (257/294, 87%) used chemical models that could be classified as simple mineralization models (159/257, 62%) or pH-cycling models (98/257, 38%). In vitro studies consumed less expense and time than in vivo studies. Furthermore, in vitro conditions were easier to control. However, they could hardly imitate the complex structures of oral cavities, the microbiological effect of oral biofilm, and the hydrodynamic instability of saliva. The advantages of chemical models included simplicity of the study, low cost, efficiency (time saving), reproducibility, and stability of experiments. However, the “caries” generated were not biological. Moreover, the chemical models were generally basic and could not mimic a carious lesion in the complex oral environment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Concepts on Erosive Tooth Wear)
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Open AccessReview
Dental Wear: Attrition, Erosion, and Abrasion—A Palaeo-Odontological Approach
Dent. J. 2017, 5(2), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj5020019 - 17 Jun 2017
Cited by 3
Abstract
This paper reviews the surface ablation of early hominin teeth by attrition, abrasion, and erosive dental wear. The occurrence of these lesions is explored in a sample of South African fossil australopithecine dentitions revealing excessive wear. Interpretation of the nature of the dietary [...] Read more.
This paper reviews the surface ablation of early hominin teeth by attrition, abrasion, and erosive dental wear. The occurrence of these lesions is explored in a sample of South African fossil australopithecine dentitions revealing excessive wear. Interpretation of the nature of the dietary components causing such wear in the absence of carious erosion provides insight into the ecology of the Plio-pleistocene epoch (1–2 million years ago). Fossil teeth inform much of the living past by their retained evidence after death. Tooth wear is the ultimate forensic dental evidence of lives lived. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Concepts on Erosive Tooth Wear)
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