Special Issue "Current Techniques and New Materials for Root Canal Treatment"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 November 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Su-Jung Shin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Conservative Dentistry, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Dentistry, Seoul, Korea
Interests: root canal filling; calcium silicate cement; calcium silicate based sealer

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Current endodontic treatment has been improved and broadened its spectrum with new technologies and materials. Moreover, regenerative endodontic therapy has been used in past years, and there has been a large number of studies published lately. Vital pulp therapy has become a reliable option in endodontics with the development of barrier materials. With all these improvements in endodontics, it would be valuable to have clear evidence to demonstrate the effectiveness of new techniques and materials in case studies, clinical trials, in vitro studies, animal studies, and reviews.

Therefore, the aim of this Special Issue is to provide scientific evidence of using current endodontic technologies and materials in practice. The scopes of this Special Issue include evaluation of new techniques about NiTi instrumentation, filling methods, separated instrument removal techniques, new canal irrigating systems, perforation repair, proper diagnosis, and guided endodontics using CBCT. This Special Issue also covers the properties and outcomes of biomaterials such as calcium silicate cements including the original ProRoot MTA, calcium silicate based sealers, and some restorative materials as well.

I am pleased to invite you to submit new studies on endodontic diagnosis, canal instrumentation, canal irritation, canal obturation, and related new materials. Other related topics, including CBCT, surgical endodontics, outcome studies, related case reports, and review papers, are all welcomed.

Prof. Su-Jung Shin
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • instrumentation
  • canal filling
  • calcium silicate cement
  • regeneration

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Article
Influence of Tooth Factors and Procedural Errors on the Incidence and Severity of Post-Endodontic Pain: A Prospective Clinical Study
Dent. J. 2020, 8(3), 73; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8030073 - 07 Jul 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1298
Abstract
The objective of this prospective study was to assess tooth-related factors that play a role in the incidence of postoperative pain (PP) and determining if procedural errors influence PP occurrence. A total of 442 patients referred for root canal treatment met the inclusion [...] Read more.
The objective of this prospective study was to assess tooth-related factors that play a role in the incidence of postoperative pain (PP) and determining if procedural errors influence PP occurrence. A total of 442 patients referred for root canal treatment met the inclusion criteria and were included in this prospective study. The same protocol was used in all root canal treatments. Patient, tooth, treatment related factors and the occurrence of procedural errors were registered. Incidence and intensity of PP was assessed at 24 and 48 h by telephonic interview and in person seven and 15 days after treatment. A logistic and ordinal regression analysis was used to assess the role of patient, tooth and treatment related factors in the incidence and intensity of PP, respectively. Preoperative and intraoperative factors differently affected the incidence of PP at the different time intervals. The presence of procedural errors did not significantly influence PP occurrence. The presence of preoperative pain and the need of additional anesthesia during treatment were associated with higher incidence of PP 24 and 48 h after treatment; the extent of apical enlargement played a significant role in the presence of PP after seven days of treatment; and the excessive occlusal load induced by the absence of a contralateral tooth was the only factor related to the maintenance of PP up to 15 days. In conclusion, the presence of preoperative pain, the need of additional anesthesia during treatment, the extent of apical enlargement and the excessive occlusal load induced by the absence of a contralateral tooth were related to a higher incidence of PP. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Techniques and New Materials for Root Canal Treatment)

Review

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Review
The Disease Process, Diagnosis and Treatment of Invasive Cervical Resorption: A Review
Dent. J. 2020, 8(3), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8030064 - 01 Jul 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1421
Abstract
Invasive cervical resorption (ICR) is a localized, subepithelial, supra-osseous resorptive process of the tooth. Although there are several predisposing factors associated with ICR, its etiology and pathogenesis are poorly understood. The damage to the protective layer on the external root surface appears to [...] Read more.
Invasive cervical resorption (ICR) is a localized, subepithelial, supra-osseous resorptive process of the tooth. Although there are several predisposing factors associated with ICR, its etiology and pathogenesis are poorly understood. The damage to the protective layer on the external root surface appears to allow for the attachment of clastic cells and initiate the resorptive process, which is confined by the inner protective pericanalar resorption-resistant sheet surrounding the root canal space. The use of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) is recommended for the diagnosis and assessment of a resorptive lesion. Based on the thorough evaluation of the size and location of the ICR lesion using CBCT, surgical or nonsurgical treatment can be chosen to address the source of the resorption. This review discusses the current status of knowledge regarding the biology of ICR lesions as well as their external or internal treatment using hydraulic calcium silicate-based materials. Future clinical outcome studies are necessary to evaluate the impact of hydraulic calcium silicate-based materials on the healing of ICR lesions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Current Techniques and New Materials for Root Canal Treatment)
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