Special Issue "Photobiomodulation"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767). This special issue belongs to the section "Lasers in Dentistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 June 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Aldo Brugnera Junior
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
National Institute of Science and Technology (INCT)—“Basic Optics and Applied to Life Sciences”—IFSC, University of Sao Paulo, Brazil
Interests: photobiomodulation, photodynamic therapy, laser in cavity preparation, dental hypersensitive and mucosite
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Photobiomodulation (PBM), also known as low-level laser therapy (LLLT), was developed by Endre Mester (Hungary) in 1967. It has been reported that this treatment method is not invasive. Effects such as pain relief and the promotion of wound healing can be seen not only in the medical field, but also in the dental field.

However, it’s mechanism as to why such an effect can be brought remains unknown. In recent years, research at a cell biological level has advanced, and the mechanism is becoming apparent.

This Special Issue is interested in studies about photobiomodulation or LLLT in dentistry. The editorial board invites authors to submit manuscripts with current interest of basic or clinical contents.

Prof. Kenji Yoshida
Prof. Aldo Brugnera Junior
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • photobiomodulation therapy
  • PBMT
  • low level light/laser therapy
  • LLLT
  • light-emitting diodes
  • LEDs

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Photobiomodulation Therapy in the Management of Burning Mouth Syndrome: Morphological Variations in the Capillary Bed
Dent. J. 2020, 8(3), 99; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8030099 - 01 Sep 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 765
Abstract
Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is an idiopathic condition that manifests itself primarily with the onset of a burning sensation. The aim of this research was to perform photobiomodulation therapy (PBM) using a diode laser on the oral mucosa of BMS patients, followed by [...] Read more.
Burning mouth syndrome (BMS) is an idiopathic condition that manifests itself primarily with the onset of a burning sensation. The aim of this research was to perform photobiomodulation therapy (PBM) using a diode laser on the oral mucosa of BMS patients, followed by an objective evaluation of the morphological changes in the vascular bed underlying the mucosa using polarized light videocapillaroscopy. A group of 40 patients were included in the study. The patients were randomly divided into two groups (using simple randomization) as follows: 20 patients were assigned to the laser group and 20 patients were assigned to the placebo group. Each patient of the laser group received eight irradiations (with 4 Watt of power, wavelength 800 nm, energy 1200 Joules, irradiation time of 300 s, energy density 50 J/cm2, 60 mW continuous wave laser, and irradiance 180 mW/cm2), twice a week, blinded to the type of irradiation administered, for four consecutive weeks. The patients in the placebo group underwent the same sessions as the other patients, the only difference was the non-emission of the laser. An initial check of the vascular bed was performed with a polarized light videocapillaroscope. This was followed by treatment with a therapeutic diode laser and a subsequent check with a videocapillaroscope. We observed that in the group of patients who underwent laser therapy, there was a lasting improvement in symptoms. The capillary oral bed of patients in the placebo group did not show any statistically significant difference (p > 0.05). In the laser group we observed the following: in the buccal mucosa the diameter of the capillary had a reduction of 3 μm; in the upper lip mucosa, there was a reduction of 3 μm; in the lower lip mucosa, there was a reduction of 3 μm; and in the dorsal lingual surface, there was a reduction of 2 μm. An increase in capillary length was also obtained in all irradiated regions in the laser group patients (p < 0.05). PBM induces microcirculatory changes that are still present over a long period of time, such as an improvement in the clinical picture. The improvement in the symptoms has been correlated to the reduction of the capillary diameter. The placebo effect only led to a temporary improvement in symptoms that were unrelated to changes in the microcirculatory pattern. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photobiomodulation)
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Review

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Open AccessFeature PaperReview
Utility of Photodynamic Therapy in Dentistry: Current Concepts
Dent. J. 2020, 8(2), 43; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj8020043 - 07 May 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1337
Abstract
The significant growth in scientific and technological advancements within the field of dentistry has resulted in a wide range of novel treatment modalities for dentists to use. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging, non-invasive treatment method, involving photosensitizers, light of a specific wavelength [...] Read more.
The significant growth in scientific and technological advancements within the field of dentistry has resulted in a wide range of novel treatment modalities for dentists to use. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging, non-invasive treatment method, involving photosensitizers, light of a specific wavelength and the generation of singlet oxygen and reactive oxygen species (ROS) to eliminate unwanted eukaryotic cells (e.g., malignancies in the oral cavity) or pathogenic microorganisms. The aim of this review article is to summarize the history, general concepts, advantages and disadvantages of PDT and to provide examples for current indications of PDT in various subspecialties of dentistry (oral and maxillofacial surgery, oral medicine, endodontics, preventive dentistry, periodontology and implantology), in addition to presenting some images from our own experiences about the clinical success with PDT. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photobiomodulation)
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Other

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Open AccessCase Report
Photobiomodulation Therapy in the Treatment of Chronic Dysphagia Post Hormonal Therapy in a Breast Cancer Patient
by , and
Dent. J. 2019, 7(2), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj7020053 - 13 May 2019
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1339
Abstract
Among the few supportive care measures available for the management of dysphagia, Photobiomodulation (PBM) therapy, defined as the therapeutic use of light, has shown significant promise. In this case report, effective management of chronic dysphagia post hormonal therapy in a breast cancer patient [...] Read more.
Among the few supportive care measures available for the management of dysphagia, Photobiomodulation (PBM) therapy, defined as the therapeutic use of light, has shown significant promise. In this case report, effective management of chronic dysphagia post hormonal therapy in a breast cancer patient was made. Experts in the supportive care in cancer and PBM proposed and requested further investigations of the protocol used in this case report in the management of dysphagia. In this case report, the protocol of PBM was proposed by experts in supportive care in cancer. Functional outcome swallowing scale for staging oropharyngeal dysphagia was used to assess the effectiveness of the treatment in pre-operative, per and post-operative stage. This case reports that PBM is effective in the management of dysphagia, a side effect of hormonal therapy in a cancer patient. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photobiomodulation)
Open AccessCase Report
Photobiomodulation Therapy in the Treatment of Oral Mucositis, Dysgeusia and Oral Dryness as Side-Effects of Head and Neck Radiotherapy in a Cancer Patient: A Case Report
Dent. J. 2018, 6(4), 64; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj6040064 - 10 Nov 2018
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 2537
Abstract
Successful management of oral mucositis, dysgeusia and oral dryness was made with five sessions of photobiomodulation. The severity of oral mucositis was measured according to the World Health Organization scale for the assessment of oral mucositis. Dysgeusia testing was performed according to the [...] Read more.
Successful management of oral mucositis, dysgeusia and oral dryness was made with five sessions of photobiomodulation. The severity of oral mucositis was measured according to the World Health Organization scale for the assessment of oral mucositis. Dysgeusia testing was performed according to the International Standards Organization (ISO). For the assessment of oral dryness or hyposalivation, quantity of the total resting and stimulated saliva (Q-sal, mL/min) was measured. Photobiomodulation parameters, applications, and treatment protocol used were suggested by an international multidisciplinary panel of clinicians and researchers with expertise in the area of supportive care in cancer and/or PBM clinical application and dosimetry. This case report confirms the effectiveness of photobiomodulation therapy in the management of oral mucositis, dysgeusia, and oral dryness. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Photobiomodulation)
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