Special Issue "3D Imaging, 3D Printing and 3D Virtual Planning in Dentistry"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 July 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Dr. Claude Jaquiéry

Department of Cranio—Maxillofacial Surgery and Hightech Research Center of CMF—Surgery, University Hospital Basel, Spitalstrasse 21, CH-4031 Basel, Switzerland
Website | E-Mail
Phone: 0041 61 328 72 33

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, interest in 3D imaging, 3D printing and 3D virtual planning used in clinical diagnosis, surgery planning and implant fabrication in dentistry, as well as head and neck surgery, has increased dramatically. This themed Special Issue aims to cover the most recent progress in the development of technologies for image acquisition systems and 3D virtual planning software, new advances in 3D planning and 3D printing technology in dental and head and neck treatment procedures.

The objective of this Special Issue is to provide a platform for oral, maxillofacial, ENT and dental scientists to share their research ideas and achievements.

Prof. Dr. Claude Jaquiéry
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 350 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • 3D imaging

  • 3D virtual planning

  • 3D printing

  • Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT)

  • Computer-aided design (CAD)

  • Computer-aided manufacture (CAM)

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Accuracy of Digitally Fabricated Wax Denture Bases and Conventional Completed Complete Dentures
Dent. J. 2017, 5(4), 36; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj5040036
Received: 22 June 2017 / Revised: 6 December 2017 / Accepted: 11 December 2017 / Published: 19 December 2017
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Abstract
The purpose of this investigation was to analyze the accuracy of digitally fabricated wax trial dentures and conventionally finalized complete dentures in comparison to a surface tessellation language (STL)-dataset. A generated data set for the denture bases and the tooth sockets was used, [...] Read more.
The purpose of this investigation was to analyze the accuracy of digitally fabricated wax trial dentures and conventionally finalized complete dentures in comparison to a surface tessellation language (STL)-dataset. A generated data set for the denture bases and the tooth sockets was used, converted into STL-format, and saved as reference. Five mandibular and 5 maxillary denture bases were milled from wax blanks and denture teeth were waxed into their tooth sockets. Each complete denture was checked on fit, waxed onto the dental cast, and digitized using an optical laboratory scanning device. The complete dentures were completed conventionally using the injection method, finished, and scanned. The resulting STL-datasets were exported into the three-dimensional (3D) software GOM Inspect. Each of the 5 mandibular and 5 maxillary complete dentures was aligned with the STL- and the wax trial denture dataset. Alignment was performed based on a best-fit algorithm. A three-dimensional analysis of the spatial divergences in x-, y- and z-axes was performed by the 3D software and visualized in a color-coded illustration. The mean positive and negative deviations between the datasets were calculated automatically. In a direct comparison between maxillary wax trial dentures and complete dentures, complete dentures showed higher deviations from the STL-dataset than the wax trial dentures. The deviations occurred in the area of the teeth as well as in the distal area of the denture bases. In contrast, the highest deviations in both the mandibular wax trial dentures and the mandibular complete dentures were observed in the distal area. The complete dentures showed higher deviations on the occlusal surfaces of the teeth compared to the wax dentures. Computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM)-fabricated wax dentures exhibited fewer deviations from the STL-reference than the complete dentures. The deviations were significantly greater in the vicinity of the denture teeth area and the bases. The conventional transfer of CAD/CAM-fabricated wax dentures into acrylic resin leads to the highest deviations from the STL-reference. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 3D Imaging, 3D Printing and 3D Virtual Planning in Dentistry)
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Open AccessArticle Quantitative Analysis of Velopharyngeal Movement by Applying Principal Component Analysis to Range Images Produced by a Three-Dimensional Endoscope
Dent. J. 2017, 5(2), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj5020014
Received: 20 December 2016 / Revised: 16 March 2017 / Accepted: 20 March 2017 / Published: 23 March 2017
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Abstract
Objectives: The purpose of this study was to develop a new technique for analyzing velopharyngeal movement and to investigate its utility. Materials and Methods: Velopharyngeal motion of 20 normal individuals was analyzed. A three-dimensional (3D) endoscope was inserted into the oral cavity, and [...] Read more.
Objectives: The purpose of this study was to develop a new technique for analyzing velopharyngeal movement and to investigate its utility. Materials and Methods: Velopharyngeal motion of 20 normal individuals was analyzed. A three-dimensional (3D) endoscope was inserted into the oral cavity, and the movement of the soft palate was measured using an exclusive fixation device. Range images of the soft palate were produced during phonation of the Japanese vowel /a/, and virtual grids were then overlaid on these images. Principal component analyses were applied to the 3D coordinates of the intersections of the virtual grids. The centers of gravity of the virtual grids were calculated, and the magnitude of the shift of the grid intersections during phonation was calculated. Results: The first and the second principal component scores were responsible for the upper posterior direction and the upper direction, respectively. The average magnitude of the shift of the center of gravity was 4.75 mm in males and 4.33 mm in females. Conclusions: Quantitative analysis of velopharyngeal movement was achieved by a method of applying principal component analysis (PCA) to the range images obtained from a 3D endoscope. There was no sex difference in velopharyngeal movement. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 3D Imaging, 3D Printing and 3D Virtual Planning in Dentistry)
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