Special Issue "Zinc Oxide Nanomaterials and Based Devices"

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352). This special issue belongs to the section "Crystalline Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 December 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Nikolaos Bouropoulos

Department of Materials Science, University of Patras, Greece and Institute of Chemical Engineering Sciences (FORTH/ICE-HT), Patras, Greece
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Interests: biological mineralization; calcium phosphates; calcium phosphate bone cements; crystal growth; controlled drug delivery systems based on biopolymers; synthesis and characterization of ZnO
Guest Editor
Prof. Ahmad Umar

Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science and Arts and Promising Centre for Sensors and Electronic Devices, Najran University, Najran, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia
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Interests: semiconductor nanotechnology; functional nanomaterials; sensors; electronic and energy devices; environmental remediation; bio-applications of functional nanomaterials
Guest Editor
Prof. Sotirios Baskoutas

Department of Materials Science, University of Patras, Patra, Greece
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Interests: theoretical and computational methods for the study of the electronic and optical properties of semiconducting nanomaterials; synthesis with physical methods; characterization of amorphous and nanocrystalline materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Zinc oxide (ZnO), a II-VI semiconductor, is considered to be one of the most important and multifunctional materials due to its own properties and, hence, wide applications. The tetrahedral coordinated bonding geometry of ZnO crystallizes in the form of a zinc blende type structure or, most commonly, in the hexagonal wurtzite structure. Because of their multifunctional properties, various ZnO nanomaterials such as nanotubes, nanorods, nanowires, nanobelts, nanonails, nanoflowers, hierarchical nanostructures, and so on were synthesized using several synthetic techniques—to name a few, the vapor–liquid–solid thermal sublimation method, hydrothermal growth, electrochemical deposition, molecular beam epitaxy, decomposition of zinc precursor compounds, colloidal or solution based synthesis, etc.

Including various other properties, such as wide band gap and high exciton binding energy, ZnO possesses noncentrosymmetric structures which enable it to be used for the fabrication of various piezoelectric devices and systems. ZnO also possesses interesting biocompatible and environmental benign properties and is thus efficiently used for various chemicals, gases, and biosensors and various other environmental remediation applications. Further, due to their excellent optical, piezoelectric, pyroelectric, and photoconducting properties, ZnO nanostructures are used in a wide range of modern technological applications, including electronic and optoelectronic devices, such as light emitting diodes, sensors and actuators, field emitters, dye-sensitized solar cells, piezoelectric nanogenerators, and so on. Moreover, due to its high isoelectric point, ZnO has the ability to bind biological molecules, making this material suitable for the development of biosensors and other bioanalytical devices.

This Special Issue is a timely approach to surveying recent progress in the area of ZnO nanomaterials and their applications. The articles presented in this Special Issue will cover various topics, ranging from materials preparation, engineering, functionalization, and their various applications, such as sensors (chemical, biological, gas, and so on), environmental remediation, biological labeling, fuel cell, electrocatalysis, catalysis, photocatalysis, electronic devices, bio-applications of nanomaterials, and so on. Certainly, the coverage is not complete, but it is our intention that this Special Issue will offer a unique glimpse of what has been achieved and what remains to be explored in ZnO nanomaterials.

The Special Issue will cover (but not be limited to) the following topics:

  • Synthesis and characterizations of zinc oxide nanomaterials;
  • ZnO-based Sensors (bio, chemical, gas, optical, etc.) ;
  • ZnO-based catalysis and photocatalysis;
  • Environmental remediation using ZnO nanomaterials;
  • Electronic devices based on ZnO nanomaterials;
  • Energy devices based on ZnO nanomaterials;
  • Bio applications based on ZnO nanomaterials;
  • Theoretical studies;
  • Etc.

It is our pleasure to invite you to submit review articles, original papers, and communications for this Special Issue, "Zinc Oxide Nanomaterials and Based Devices".

Prof. Bouropoulos Nikolaos
Prof. Ahmad Umar
Prof. Sotirios Baskoutas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Crystals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • ZnO nanostructures
  • ZnO quantum dots
  • ZnO nanowires and nanorods
  • ZnO nanocomposites
  • ZnO thin films
  • ZnO random laser diodes
  • ZnO based sensors and biosensors
  • ZnO heterostructure
  • ZnO based devices

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Passivation Effect on ZnO Films by SF6 Plasma Treatment
Crystals 2019, 9(5), 236; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst9050236
Received: 11 April 2019 / Revised: 30 April 2019 / Accepted: 2 May 2019 / Published: 5 May 2019
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Abstract
The passivation effects of SF6 plasma on zinc oxide (ZnO) films prepared by magnetron sputtering were researched. After the SF6 plasma passivation of ZnO films, the grain size increases, there is low surface roughness, and a small amount of Zn-F bonds [...] Read more.
The passivation effects of SF6 plasma on zinc oxide (ZnO) films prepared by magnetron sputtering were researched. After the SF6 plasma passivation of ZnO films, the grain size increases, there is low surface roughness, and a small amount of Zn-F bonds are formed, resulting in the narrowing of band gap. The photoluminescence (PL) intensity of SF6-passivated ZnO films has a 120% increase compared to the untreated samples, and the reduction in defects can increase the resistivity and stability of ZnO films. ZnO films are used in the preparation of ZnO/p-Si heterojunction diodes. The results of the measurement of current voltage (J–V) show that the reverse current is reduced after SF6 plasma passivation, indicating an improvement in the electrical properties of ZnO films. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Zinc Oxide Nanomaterials and Based Devices)
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Open AccessArticle
The Decoloration of Anionic and Cationic Dyes Using ZnO and ZnO-Cu2O
Crystals 2019, 9(5), 229; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst9050229
Received: 29 March 2019 / Revised: 26 April 2019 / Accepted: 26 April 2019 / Published: 28 April 2019
PDF Full-text (1817 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
ZnO and ZnO-Cu2O were grown on aluminum foam using hydrothermal method. Due to the positively charged sites on the surface, both ZnO and ZnO-Cu2O show higher adsorption capability towards anionic dyes, but poorer adsorption capability towards cationic dyes. The [...] Read more.
ZnO and ZnO-Cu2O were grown on aluminum foam using hydrothermal method. Due to the positively charged sites on the surface, both ZnO and ZnO-Cu2O show higher adsorption capability towards anionic dyes, but poorer adsorption capability towards cationic dyes. The adsorption ability of ZnO-Cu2O is smaller than that of ZnO since there is a depletion layer at the interface. In order to decolorize cationic dyes, ZnO and ZnO-Cu2O are used as sono-catalyst with ultrasonic irradiation. The ZnO-Cu2O is better than ZnO in sono-catalysis decoloration of cationic dyes. This may be due to the enhanced piezoelectricity and electrochemical activity, as the free electrons in ZnO are reduced in the depletion layer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Zinc Oxide Nanomaterials and Based Devices)
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Open AccessArticle
Passivation Mechanism of Nitrogen in ZnO under Different Oxygen Ambience
Crystals 2019, 9(4), 204; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst9040204
Received: 6 March 2019 / Revised: 3 April 2019 / Accepted: 9 April 2019 / Published: 12 April 2019
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Abstract
Nitrogen-doped ZnO thin films were grown on a-plane Al2O3 by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Hall-effect measurements indicated that the nitrogen-doped ZnO films showed p-type behavior first, then n-type, with the growth conditions changing from oxygen-radical-rich to oxygen-radical-deficient ambience, accompanied with [...] Read more.
Nitrogen-doped ZnO thin films were grown on a-plane Al2O3 by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. Hall-effect measurements indicated that the nitrogen-doped ZnO films showed p-type behavior first, then n-type, with the growth conditions changing from oxygen-radical-rich to oxygen-radical-deficient ambience, accompanied with the increase of the N/O ratio in the plasmas. The increasing green emission in the low temperature photoluminescence spectra, related to single ionized oxygen vacancy in ZnO, was ascribed to the decrease of active oxygen atoms in the precursor plasmas. CN complex, a donor defect with low formation energy, was demonstrated to be easily introduced into ZnO under O-radical-deficient ambience, which compensated the nitrogen-related acceptor, along with the oxygen vacancy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Zinc Oxide Nanomaterials and Based Devices)
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