Special Issue "Hierarchical Composite Materials"

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352). This special issue belongs to the section "Hybrid and Composite Crystalline Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 February 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Bernd Markert
Website
Guest Editor
Institute of General Mechanics, RWTH Aachen University, Germany
Interests: porous media; continuum mechanics; applied mechanics; computational biomechanics; coupled problems
Dr. Sandeep Patil
Website
Guest Editor
Institute of General Mechanics, RWTH Aachen University, Germany
Interests: molecular dynamics simulations; biomaterials; aerogels; finite element method; multiscale modeling; nanocomposites

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Naturally occurring hierarchical-structured composite materials have extraordinary mechanical properties. The prime examples are spider dragline silk and nacre. Spider dragline silk has an unusual combination of high strength, extensibility, and toughness, outperforming some of the best human-made materials in terms of its mechanical performance. Dragline silk has a semi-crystalline structure consisting of a crystalline region of short polyalanine segments forming stiff β-sheet nanocrystals. These are surrounded by amorphous glycine-rich domains, which provide extensibility of the fiber. Nacre, also known as the Mother of Pearl, is an organic–inorganic composite material produced by some mollusks as an inner shell layer. In the last three decades, the structure and the toughening mechanism of nacre have been the subject of intensive research. This interest originates from nacre’s excellent combination of strength, stiffness, and toughness. It is composed of hexagonal platelets of aragonite arranged in a continuous parallel lamina. The layers are separated by sheets of an organic matrix composed of elastic biopolymers. This mixture of brittle platelets and the thin layers of elastic biopolymers make the material strong and resilient.

 

We invite researchers to contribute to the Special Issue on Hierarchical Composite Materials, which is proposed to serve as a unique multidisciplinary platform covering broad aspects of science, engineering, and the application of hierarchical-structured biomaterials and nature-inspired human-made composite materials.

Prof. Dr. Bernd Markert
Dr. Sandeep Patil
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Crystals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biomaterials
  • Hierarchical-structured composites
  • Nature-inspired composites
  • Multiscale modeling
  • Structure–properties relationships
  • Mechanical properties
  • Toughening mechanisms

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

Open AccessReview
Design Efficiency, Characteristics, and Utilization of Reinforced Foamed Concrete: A Review
Crystals 2020, 10(10), 948; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst10100948 - 17 Oct 2020
Abstract
Foam concrete (FC) serves as an efficient construction material that combines well thermal insulation and structural properties. The studies of material characteristics, including the mechanical, physical, rheological, and functional properties of lightweight concrete, have been conducted rigorously. However, a lack of knowledge on [...] Read more.
Foam concrete (FC) serves as an efficient construction material that combines well thermal insulation and structural properties. The studies of material characteristics, including the mechanical, physical, rheological, and functional properties of lightweight concrete, have been conducted rigorously. However, a lack of knowledge on the design efficiency of reinforced FC (RFC) was found in current research trends, compared to reinforced lightweight aggregate concrete. Therefore, this paper presents a review of the performance and adaption in structures for RFC. According to the code specifications, the feasibility investigation was preliminarily determined in structural use through the summary for the mechanical properties of FC of FC’s mechanical properties. For reinforced concrete design, a direct method of reduction factors is introduced to design lightweight aggregate concrete, which is also suggested to be adapted into a lightweight FC design. It was found that flexural shear behavior is a more complex theoretical analysis than flexure. However, a reduction factor of 0.75 was recommended for shear, torsion, and compression; meanwhile, 0.6 for flexural members. Serviceability limit states design should be applied, as the crack was found predominant in RFC design. The deflection controls were recommended as 0.7 by previous research. Research on RFC’s compression members, such as a column or load load-bearing wall, were rarely found. Thus, further study for validating a safe design of RFC applications in construction industries today is highly imperative. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Hierarchical Composite Materials)
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