Special Issue "Thin Film Transistor"

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352). This special issue belongs to the section "Crystalline Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 28 February 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Ray-Hua Horng

Department of Electronics Engineering, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan
Website | E-Mail
Interests: optoelectronic device; LEDs; solar cells; power devices; epilayer transfer; wafer bonding

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Thin film transistors are a type of field effect transistor made by depositing thin films of an active semiconductor layer, as well as the dielectric layer. There exist a wide variety of applications, such as active-matrix liquid-crystal displays, activematrix organic light-emitting displays, photodetecting devices, and biosensors. Each individual LCD pixel is controlled by one to four transistors. The TFTs acts as an switches which allows the pixels to turn on and off very easily.The basis difference between LCD and TFT is that TFT is technology is used to produce LCDs. Solution processed organic semiconductors have offered potential applications due to their low cost, facile solution process, easy functionalization, mass production, low temperature, large area manufacture, and flexibility. However, conductive polymers have low conductivity and organic materials degrade in moisture, prohibiting suitable application of OTFTs in ambient condition. OTFT have higher on-off ratio, however, suffers from poor field-effect mobility as compared to inorganic semiconductor based thin film transistors.

Recently, new wide-band energy gap semiconductors can be grown by ALD, PLD, sputtering or MOCVD. They have a high potential to fabricate and apply to TFT. The inorganic semiconductors have good stability against environmental degradation over Organic counter parts whereas organic materials are usually flexible, transparent, and solution-processed at low temperatures, they are prone to degradation, when exposed to heat, moisture, and oxygen.

We invite researchers to submit papers that discuss the development of new functional and smart materials inorganic, as well as organic, semiconductor materials such as, ZnO, InZnO, GaO, AlGaO, AnGaO, AlN/GaN, conducting polymers, molecular semiconductors, perovskite based materials, carbon nanotubes, carbon naotubes/polymer composites and 2D materials (for example, grapheme, MoS2), etc., in potential applications for display drivers, radio frequency identification tags, e-paper, gas, chemical and biosensors, etc.

Prof. Dr. Ray-Hua Horng
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Crystals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Materials and Method: Synthesis of proposed semiconductor materials as well as dielectrics materials by low-temperature solution process and different thin film deposition techniques
  • Crystal growth of semiconductor materials and modeling
  • Controlling and optimizing the grain size, crystallinity and surface morphology modification of solution-processed organic semiconductors. Crystallization to improve the field-effect mobility as well as the on–off ratio for application of large-area electronics on flexible substrates
  • Understanding the physical parameter of thin film devices 
  • Material physical, structural and optical characterization such as SEM, HRTEM, BET, XRD, Raman, FTIR, UV-Vis, PL spectroscopy and optimization to improve the interfacial charge transfer
  • Morphology, band gaps (Eg), nanostructures, photoluminescence, and charge carrier transport will be implemented to investigate the morphology-structure-property relationship. A simulation model to predict charge trapping behavior, grain boundary effcets, defect states will be developed as well to complement the experimental results of devices
  • Study and charge trapping in high-k materials used as gate dielectric
  • A facile strategy will be developed to achieve nanostructured morphology variation which generates plasmonics effect
  • Organic thin film transistor for chemical and biological sensing
  • The reliability (failure modes by measuring the electrical properties) and stability (against the environment moisture) of Organic TFT devices with respect to time, bending (stress and strain) analysis for flexible devices. Demonstrate the resistivity of contact electrodes. Verify the local heating at the electrode/semiconductor interface under continued operation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Optical Detection of Green Emission for Non-Uniformity Film in Flat Panel Displays
Crystals 2018, 8(11), 421; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst8110421
Received: 9 September 2018 / Revised: 31 October 2018 / Accepted: 5 November 2018 / Published: 8 November 2018
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Abstract
Among colours, the green colour has the most sensitivity in human vision so that green colour defects on displays can be effortlessly perceived by a photopic eye with the most intensity in the wavelength 555 nm of the spectrum. With the market moving
[...] Read more.
Among colours, the green colour has the most sensitivity in human vision so that green colour defects on displays can be effortlessly perceived by a photopic eye with the most intensity in the wavelength 555 nm of the spectrum. With the market moving forward to high resolution, displays can have resolutions of 10 million pixels. Therefore, the method of detecting the appearance of the panel using ultra-high resolutions in TFT-LCD is important. The machine vision associated with transmission chromaticity spectrometer that quantises the defects are explored, such as blackening and whitening. The result shows the significant phenomena to recognize the non-uniformity of film-related chromatic variation. In contrast, the quantitative assessment illustrates that the just noticeable difference (JND) of chromaticity CIE xyY at 0.001 is the measuring sensitivity for the chromatic variables (x, y), whereas JND is a perceptible threshold for a colour difference metric. Moreover, an optical device associated with a 198Hg discharge lamp calibrates the spectrometer accuracy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Thin Film Transistor)
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Open AccessArticle Effectiveness of Light Source on Detecting Thin Film Transistor
Crystals 2018, 8(10), 394; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst8100394
Received: 9 September 2018 / Revised: 17 October 2018 / Accepted: 19 October 2018 / Published: 21 October 2018
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Abstract
Light sources tend to affect images captured in any automatic optical inspection (AOI) system. In this study, the effectiveness of metal-halide lamps, quartz-halogen lamps, and LEDs as the light sources in AOI systems for the detection of the third and fourth layers electrodes
[...] Read more.
Light sources tend to affect images captured in any automatic optical inspection (AOI) system. In this study, the effectiveness of metal-halide lamps, quartz-halogen lamps, and LEDs as the light sources in AOI systems for the detection of the third and fourth layers electrodes of thin-film-transistor liquid crystal displays (TFT-LCDs) is examined experimentally. The results show that the performance of LEDs is generally comparable or better than that of metal-halide and quartz-halogen lamps. The best optical performance is by the blue LED due to its spectrum compatibility with the time-delay-integration charged-coupled device (TDI CCD) sensor and its better spatial resolution. The images revealed by the blue LED are sharper and more distinctive. Since current LEDs are more energy efficient and environmentally friendly, using LEDs as the light source for AOI is very beneficial. As the blue LED performs the best, it should be adopted for AOI using TDI CCD sensors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Thin Film Transistor)
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