Advanced Additive Manufacturing of Biomaterials

A special issue of Crystals (ISSN 2073-4352). This special issue belongs to the section "Inorganic Crystalline Materials".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2022) | Viewed by 5978

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Medicine and Dentistry, Griffith University, Gold Coast, QLD 4222, Australia
Interests: 3D printing and additive manufacturing; materials characterization, processing, and synthesis; polymer composites; synthetic polymers; biomaterials; biological evaluation; zebrafish embryo model; toxicology; applications of CAD/CAM to dentistry
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Guest Editor
Faculty of Mechanical Engineering, Technical University Munich, 80333 München, Germany
Interests: metal additive manufacturing; functional graded materials; anisotropic material properties; microstructure to macroscopic properties relations
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Guest Editor
Department of Materials Science, Montanuniversität Leoben, 8700 Leoben, Austria
Interests: microsctructure characterization with high resolution analitics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As a disruptive technology, additive manufacturing has revolutionized how prototypes and end-use products are designed and manufactured and nowhere is this more evident than in the burgeoning biomedical industry with contemporaneous interest in academia. To reduce cost, optimize function and simplify the digital workflow, the various additive manufacturing processes and systems continue to improve not only for the 3D printing of conventional biomaterials but for smart materials that can be preprogrammed to respond to external stimuli.

This Special Issue seeks to bridge the chasm between biological materials, additive processes and post-processing techniques that together guarantee optimal results for various biomedical applications. We welcome submissions from academia, industry and practitioners with respect to experimental and practical 3D/4D printing of metals, ceramics, polymers and composites. The scope of this Special Issue includes high-quality reviews and original research not limited to:

  • hypothesis-driven experimental data;
  • hybrid and innovative additive processes;
  • recent clinical applications and breakthroughs;
  • innovative design and modeling of biomedical devices;
  • materials development, processing, optimization and characterization.

We look forward to receiving your submissions.

Best regards,

Dr. Frank Alifui-Segbaya
Dr. Leonhard Hitzler
Dr. Francisca Mendez Martin
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Crystals is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Biomaterials
  • Medical devices
  • 3D printing
  • 4D printing
  • Additive manufacturing
  • Advanced manufacturing

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

19 pages, 14228 KiB  
Article
Morphological and Crystallographic Effects in the Laser Powder-Bed Fused Stainless Steel Microstructure
by Tim Fischer, Leonhard Hitzler and Ewald Werner
Crystals 2021, 11(6), 672; https://doi.org/10.3390/cryst11060672 - 10 Jun 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 4433
Abstract
One of the key aspects in additive manufacturing of stainless steels is the relationship between process parameters and the resulting microstructure. The selected process parameters typically cause a rapid solidification of the material, which leads to a microstructure that is highly textured both [...] Read more.
One of the key aspects in additive manufacturing of stainless steels is the relationship between process parameters and the resulting microstructure. The selected process parameters typically cause a rapid solidification of the material, which leads to a microstructure that is highly textured both morphologically and crystallographically. While the morphological texture is characterised by a mainly columnar shape of the grains, the crystallographic texture is marked by a preferred grain orientation in the <001> direction (fibre texture). Due to the texture effects, pronounced anisotropic mechanical properties are present in the material. In this report, a series of virtual microstructures with different morphological and crystallographic features are generated to develop a fundamental understanding of the individual texture effects on the mechanical properties. The grain morphology is based on Voronoi tessellations, and the crystallographic texture is captured with crystal plasticity. Furthermore, the numerical predictions are compared with experimental studies. The mechanical properties predicted on the basis of the virtual microstructures show that the crystallographic effect is much more dominant than the morphology of the individual grains. Consistent with the experiments, the highest load-bearing capacity of the material occurs when the macroscopic loading acts under an angle of 45 to the preferred orientation of the crystals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Additive Manufacturing of Biomaterials)
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