Special Issue "Novel Advances in Food Contact Materials"

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Raquel Sendón
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Food Science, Faculty of Pharmacy University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, Spain
Interests: food contact materials, food safety, migration, coatings, analytical chemistry, active food packaging, bioactive compounds, food analysis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Ana Rodríguez Bernaldo de Quirós
Website
Guest Editor
Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Bromatology Department, Pharmacy Faculty, Campus Vida s/n, University of Santiago de Compostela, 15782 Santiago de Compostela, La Coruña, Spain
Interests: food contact materials; food safety; migration; risk assessment; food packaging materials; coatings; analytical chemistry; active food packaging; bioactive compounds; food analysis
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Packaging is essential for extending the shelf life of perishable foods and maintaining the quality of non-perishable foods. This is the result of the prevention of food contamination where packaging is a crucial player, as well as the interaction of packaging with the food itself or with the surrounding environment influencing so directly in the preservation of foods. The continuous search for higher quality and safer foods has led to the growing interest in novel food contact materials, and, bearing in mind the contamination issues related to plastic materials (the food contact material widest used), the development of new materials based on biodegradable or sustainable polymers has increased in recent years. Moreover, active agents can be added to these materials, and great attention is being paid to obtaining such agent from food industry by-products to contribute to a more circular economy.

On the other hand, the safety of food contact materials has become a concern for food safety authorities since components of these materials, present in the final product, can migrate to the food and are a risk for the consumers’ health, especially if high consumption of the packed food occurs.

Nowadays, the identification of potential migrants present in the food contact materials, including unexpected substances, is one of the most challenging topics for the scientific community in the food packaging field.

The main aim of this Special Issue “Novel Advances in Food Contact Materials” is to provide a set of high-quality papers that cover the latest developments in new or active food packaging materials as well as all aspects regarding their safety.

We invite you authors to submit relevant original research papers or critical reviews to this Special Issue.

 The topics of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Active food packaging;
  • Biodegradable materials for food contact applications;
  • Bio-based materials for food contact applications;
  • Migration evaluation of novel food contact materials;
  • Safety evaluation of novel food contact materials.

Prof. Dr. Raquel Sendón
Prof. Dr. Ana Rodríguez Bernaldo de Quirós
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
An Active Gelatin Coating Containing Eugenol and Vacuum Delays the Decay of Chinese Seabass (Lateolabrax maculatus) Fillets during Cold Storage: A Microbiome Perspective
Coatings 2021, 11(2), 147; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings11020147 - 28 Jan 2021
Viewed by 289
Abstract
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of an active gelatin coating containing eugenol and vacuum on the microbial diversity of Chinese seabass (Lateolabrax maculatus) during cold (−0.9 °C) storage. The bacterial sequences in Chinese seabass were observed [...] Read more.
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of an active gelatin coating containing eugenol and vacuum on the microbial diversity of Chinese seabass (Lateolabrax maculatus) during cold (−0.9 °C) storage. The bacterial sequences in Chinese seabass were observed using a high-throughput sequencing technique targeting the V3–V4 region of the 16S Ribosomal DNA (rDNA) on 0, 12th, and 24th day, which showed a more comprehensive estimate of the microbial diversity in seabass samples compared with microbial enumeration. The results revealed that the species diversity of fresh seabass was rich, mainly including Carnobacterium, Glutamicibacter, and Pseudomonas, with abundance ratios of 0.286, 0.160, and 0.130, respectively. Pseudomonas and Shewanella were the primary contaminants in the spoiled control samples, where the abundance ratios increased from 0.220 and 0.174 on the 12th day to 0.802 and 0.163 on the 24th day, respectively. Vacuum treatment could inhibit the growth of Pseudomonas and Shewanella such that when stored on the 12th day, Brochothrix became the superior genus. However, Pseudomonas and Shewanella dominated the storage until the 24th day, where their abundance ratios were 0.343 and 0.279, respectively. The inhibition of Pseudomonas and Carnobacterium was gradually enhanced with increasing concentrations of eugenol. Furthermore, an active gelatin coating containing eugenol and vacuum treatment was more effective at inhibiting the increase of the total volatile basic nitrogen. This study confirmed that an active gelatin coating containing eugenol and vacuum could reduce the species of bacteria, inhibit the growth and reproduction of the main dominant spoilage bacteria, and delay the spoilage of seabass. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Advances in Food Contact Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
The Influence of Multilayer, “Sandwich” Package on the Freshness of Bread after 72 h Storage
Coatings 2020, 10(12), 1175; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10121175 - 30 Nov 2020
Viewed by 393
Abstract
The goal of this research was to evaluate a polymeric system, including biopolymers, as a multi-component material coating on paperboard for bread. The main aim of the research was to create a humidity-controlling packaging material. This means that the packaging material should contain [...] Read more.
The goal of this research was to evaluate a polymeric system, including biopolymers, as a multi-component material coating on paperboard for bread. The main aim of the research was to create a humidity-controlling packaging material. This means that the packaging material should contain filler which will absorb water or water vapour from the bread. The ideal packaging should have high barrier qualities against water vapour, enabling the possible release of water from the product (to maintain proper humidity inside the packaging). The preliminary storage tests made of the bread confirmed that the freshness of a product kept in a climatic chamber in RH = 70% was the highest. To summarise, the obtained packaging should maintain the required humidity (in the case of bread, the optimal humidity is 70%) within the packaging to keep the bread fresh after more than 72 h of storage. A “sandwich” form of (multilayer) packaging was indicated as a solution to this problem. The main objective of this packaging was to obtain two paper layers and one starch layer to increase water absorption from the bread. It was also important to obtain a thin, external hydrophobic layer to decrease the water vapour transmission rate of the packaging (WVTR). A number of ‘’sandwich” packaging types were prepared, consisting of two sheets of paper with an external aquaseal coating and an internal starch coating (with a NaCl filler). The covered ‘’sandwich” papers were then used to create packaging that could be used for the bread storage tests. The study results confirmed that the bread stored for 72 h in the “sandwich” packaging was found to be fresher than the same product stored in commercial paper packaging. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Advances in Food Contact Materials)
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Open AccessArticle
HPLC with Fluorescence Detection for Determination of Bisphenol A in Canned Vegetables: Optimization, Validation and Application to Samples from Portuguese and Spanish Markets
Coatings 2020, 10(7), 624; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10070624 - 30 Jun 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 734
Abstract
Bisphenol A (BPA) is one of the chemicals used to produce both polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resin coatings. Research has shown that small amounts of BPA can migrate into the foods and beverages enclosed in these types of containers. In this research, an [...] Read more.
Bisphenol A (BPA) is one of the chemicals used to produce both polycarbonate plastics and epoxy resin coatings. Research has shown that small amounts of BPA can migrate into the foods and beverages enclosed in these types of containers. In this research, an analytical method based on high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD) was developed and validated for the determination of BPA in canned vegetables. The results were confirmed by liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was performed, to identify the coating material of each tin can. Nineteen cans of vegetables were taken as study samples (eleven samples from the Spanish market, and eight samples from the Portuguese market). Excellent linear correlation (r2 = 0.9999) was observed over the range of 0.01 to 0.25 mg/L. Limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) values were calculated to be 0.005 mg/kg and 0.01 mg/kg, respectively. Good recoveries, between 72% and 90% were obtained at three different levels of concentration (RSD% = 4.6). BPA was not detected in the samples. The proposed HPLC-FLD was found to be suitable for the determination of BPA in canned vegetables. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Advances in Food Contact Materials)
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Open AccessEditor’s ChoiceArticle
Poultry Shelf-Life Enhancing Potential of Nanofibers and Nanoparticles Containing Porphyra dioica Extracts
Coatings 2020, 10(4), 315; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10040315 - 26 Mar 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1057
Abstract
Aqueous extracts of commercially available red macroalgae Porphyra dioica were integrated as inner coatings of food-grade polypropylene (PP) films through use of electrospinning and electrospraying technologies. Two coating formulations (A = 5 wt% P. dioica extract and 7.5 wt% polyvinyl alcohol (PVA); B [...] Read more.
Aqueous extracts of commercially available red macroalgae Porphyra dioica were integrated as inner coatings of food-grade polypropylene (PP) films through use of electrospinning and electrospraying technologies. Two coating formulations (A = 5 wt% P. dioica extract and 7.5 wt% polyvinyl alcohol (PVA); B = 1 wt% P. dioica extract, 1 wt% PVA, and 17% gelatine) were evaluated as to their capacity to delay spoilage of minced chicken breasts, through monitoring of microbial growth (total mesophile aerobic colony counts), colour stability, lipid oxidation (thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS)), and sensory analysis over a 4-day refrigerated storage. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) imaging revealed an increased nanofiber and nanoparticle density on extract-enriched fibers, without compromise to their morphology or the homogeneity of the coatings. Total microbial counts on coating B samples was significantly (p < 0.001) reduced compared to uncoated plastic wraps. The coated samples also exhibited fewer colour degradation, though the coatings did not differ substantially from uncoated plastic wrap. Sensory analysis test subjects successfully distinguished the raw samples based on their treatment and gave a positive approval rating (66.7%) to the extract-enriched coatings when asked about edibility post storage. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Advances in Food Contact Materials)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Efficiency of Novel Antimicrobial Coating Based on Iron Nanoparticles for Dairy Products’ Packaging
Coatings 2020, 10(2), 156; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10020156 - 09 Feb 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1033
Abstract
The main function of food packaging is to maintain food’s quality and safety. The use of active packaging, including antimicrobial materials, can significantly extend the shelf life of food. Many of these packaging solutions are based on the application of polymer films containing [...] Read more.
The main function of food packaging is to maintain food’s quality and safety. The use of active packaging, including antimicrobial materials, can significantly extend the shelf life of food. Many of these packaging solutions are based on the application of polymer films containing metal nanoparticles (e.g., Ag, Au, Cu) or metal oxides (e.g., TiO2, ZnO, MgO). However, the use of iron nanoparticles is rarely mentioned. In the study, polylactide (PLA) films containing zero-valent iron (ZVI) were made by casting method. Pure PLA films and PLA films with the addition of Fe2O3 were used as comparative materials. The composition and structure of ZVI/PLA films were evaluated with scanning electron microscopy. The XRD spectra performed on ZVI/PLA films confirmed the presence of iron in the packaging material and revealed their oxide form (Fe2O3). The addition of zero-valent iron in the concentration 1%, 3%, or 5% resulted in the formation of crystallographic planes measuring 40.8, 33.6, and 28.6 nm, respectively. The color and gloss of the films, and their antimicrobial activity against bacteria (Bacillus subtilis, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus epidermidis) and fungi (Geotrichum candidum, Rhodotorula rubra) were also examined. The PLA films with addition of 3% of ZVI (w/w) inhibited the growth of all tested organisms in contrast to PLA and PLA/Fe2O3 films. The addition of ZVI to polymer matrix caused changes in its appearance and optical properties. The ZVI/PLA coating used on polyolefin film allowed to extend the shelf life of goat cheese packed in examined material to 6 weeks. Considering the antimicrobial properties of the ZVI/PLA films and PLA biodegradability the obtained material can be successfully applied in the food industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Advances in Food Contact Materials)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Review on Polysaccharides Used in Coatings for Food Packaging Papers
Coatings 2020, 10(6), 566; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10060566 - 15 Jun 2020
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1609
Abstract
Paper and board show many advantages as packaging materials, but the current technologies employed to obtain adequate barrier properties for food packaging use synthetic polymers coating and lamination with plastic or aluminium foils—treatments which have a negative impact on packaging sustainability, poor recyclability [...] Read more.
Paper and board show many advantages as packaging materials, but the current technologies employed to obtain adequate barrier properties for food packaging use synthetic polymers coating and lamination with plastic or aluminium foils—treatments which have a negative impact on packaging sustainability, poor recyclability and lack of biodegradability. Recently, biopolymers have attracted increased attention as paper coatings, which can provide new combinations in composite formulas to meet the requirements of food packaging. The number of studies on biopolymers for developing barrier properties of packaging materials is increasing, but only a few of them are addressed to food packaging paper. Polysaccharides are viewed as the main candidates to substitute oil-based polymers in food paper coating, due to their film forming ability, good affinity for paper substrate, appropriate barrier to gases and aroma, and positive effect on mechanical strength. Additionally, these biopolymers are biodegradable, non-toxic and act as a matrix for incorporation additives with specific functionalities for coated paper (i.e., active-antimicrobial properties). This paper presents an overview on the availability and application of polysaccharides from vegetal and marine biomass in coatings for foods packaging paper. The extraction methods, chemical modification and combination routes of these biopolymers in coatings for paper packaging are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Advances in Food Contact Materials)
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Open AccessReview
The Use of Edible Films Based on Sodium Alginate in Meat Product Packaging: An Eco-Friendly Alternative to Conventional Plastic Materials
Coatings 2020, 10(2), 166; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10020166 - 12 Feb 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1427
Abstract
The amount of plastics used globally today exceeds a million tonnes annually, with an alarming annual growth. The final result is that plastic packaging is thrown into the environment, and the problem of waste is increasing every year. A real alternative is the [...] Read more.
The amount of plastics used globally today exceeds a million tonnes annually, with an alarming annual growth. The final result is that plastic packaging is thrown into the environment, and the problem of waste is increasing every year. A real alternative is the use bio-based polymer packaging materials. Research carried out in the laboratory context and products tested at the industrial level have confirmed the success of replacing plastic-based packaging with new, edible or completely biodegradable foils. Of the polysaccharides used to obtain edible materials, sodium alginate has the ability to form films with certain specific properties: resistance, gloss, flexibility, water solubility, low permeability to O2 and vapors, and tasteless or odorless. Initially used as coatings for perishable or cut fresh fruits and vegetables, these sodium alginate materials can be applied to a wide range of foods, especially in the meat industry. Used to cover meat products, sodium alginate films prevent mass loss and degradation of color and texture. The addition of essential oils prevents microbial contamination with Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes, or Botrytis cinerea. The obtained results promote the substitution of plastic packaging with natural materials based on biopolymers and, implicitly, of sodium alginate, with or without other natural additions. These natural materials have become the packaging of the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Advances in Food Contact Materials)
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Open AccessEditor’s ChoiceReview
Cactus Mucilage for Food Packaging Applications
Coatings 2019, 9(10), 655; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings9100655 - 11 Oct 2019
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1079
Abstract
Natural polymers have been widely investigated for the development of eco-friendly materials. Among these bio-polymers, cactus mucilage is attracting increasing interest regardless of the plant species or the plant organ used for extraction. Mucilage, which is a highly branched heteropolysaccharide, has been previously [...] Read more.
Natural polymers have been widely investigated for the development of eco-friendly materials. Among these bio-polymers, cactus mucilage is attracting increasing interest regardless of the plant species or the plant organ used for extraction. Mucilage, which is a highly branched heteropolysaccharide, has been previously studied for its chemical composition, structural features, and biotechnological applications. This review highlights the mucilage application in the food packaging industry, by developing films and coatings. These cactus-based biomaterials will be discussed for their functional properties and their potential in preserving food quality and extending shelf life. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Advances in Food Contact Materials)
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