Functional Coatings: From Synthesis Challenges to Antimicrobial Applications

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioactive Coatings and Biointerfaces".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2023) | Viewed by 3839

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
“Laser-Surface-Plasma Interactions” Laboratory, Lasers Department, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Institute of Atomic Physics, P.O. Box MG-36, 077125 Magurele, Romania
Interests: spectroscopy; lasers; surface studies and lasers processing; laser interactions; lasers and plasma physics; nanostructured thin films technology (PLD, MAPLE); surface physics and engineering; biomedicine; nano-bio-technologies; bio-sensors
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

During the last decade, attention has been drawn toward the design, synthesis, and characterization of efficient antimicrobial coatings. The term “functional coatings” will cover both their intrinsic (e.g., superhydrophobicity, antimicrobial, self-stratification) and stimuli-responsive functionality (e.g., self-healing, shape-memory), with potential use in medicine, dentistry, pharmaceutics, etc.

This Special Issue aims to present brief correspondence, research papers, and review articles addressing problems and recent developments in surface modifications, namely coatings which incorporate different active agents (polymers, polysaccharides, essential oils, plant extracts, antimicrobial peptides, etc.), with antibacterial and antimicrobial applications.

Of special interest for this Special Issue are the techniques (including but not limited to spin-coating, dip-coating, atomic layer deposition, and chemical or physical vapor deposition) applied for obtaining these functional coatings.

Topics of interest include:

  • Coatings for specific microorganisms
  • Films/coatings to reduce microbial contamination
  • Organic coatings
  • Nanocomposite films
  • Natural materials in antimicrobial coatings

Dr. Irina Negut
Dr. Valentina Grumezescu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

17 pages, 3813 KiB  
Article
Porous and Dense Alginate/Chitosan Composite Films Loaded with Simvastatin for Dressing Applications
by Rubens T. Monteiro, Thamyres F. Da Silva, Luciana de Souza Guedes, Raimundo N. F. Moreira Filho, Ana L. B. Soares, Niédja F. Vasconcelos, Fabia K. Andrade and Rodrigo S. Vieira
Coatings 2024, 14(3), 278; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings14030278 - 25 Feb 2024
Viewed by 1153
Abstract
Alginate is a biocompatible polysaccharide matrix used for bioactive dressings with inherent healing properties. Most alginate dressings are produced as single-layer dressings. This study explores the potential of bilayer membranes to modulate drug release and enhance antimicrobial properties. We used alginate and chitosan [...] Read more.
Alginate is a biocompatible polysaccharide matrix used for bioactive dressings with inherent healing properties. Most alginate dressings are produced as single-layer dressings. This study explores the potential of bilayer membranes to modulate drug release and enhance antimicrobial properties. We used alginate and chitosan loaded with simvastatin, an anti-inflammatory drug. One membrane comprised dense layers of both alginate and chitosan, while the other featured a dense alginate upper layer and a porous chitosan lower layer. The current study introduces a new approach in which a bilayer membrane is modeled instead of creating a polymeric blend between alginate and chitosan. The upper layer of the membrane contains only alginate loaded with simvastatin, while the bottom layer contains only chitosan. Another innovation is the study of the use of a porous lower layer of chitosan. Therefore, the association of these polymers in a bilayer and porous membrane gives advanced therapeutic dressings (with anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial properties intrinsic to the membrane) that are more efficient in the healing of complex wounds. Comprehensive characterization encompassed physicochemical, thermal, morphological, and mechanical properties. Microbiological tests were conducted using chitosan extract, and cytotoxicity evaluations were performed on fibroblast and keratinocyte cells. The results showed interlayer adhesion due to ionic interactions between alginate and chitosan surfaces. The drying process influenced the morphological and physicochemical features of the membranes. Simvastatin release profiles demonstrated sustained release over an extended period (approximately 60%–70% of the drug after 96 h). Storage assessments revealed that after six months, the membranes maintained around 98% of the initial simvastatin content. The antimicrobial activity test underscored the bacteriostatic efficacy of the chitosan porous layer, making it well-suited for infected wounds. Cell viability tests confirmed the non-cytotoxic nature of the films, highlighting their promising characteristics for treating diverse skin lesion types. Full article
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10 pages, 3282 KiB  
Article
Roles of Self-Assembly and Secondary Structures in Antimicrobial Peptide Coatings
by Xiao Zhu, Weilong Tang, Xinyi Cheng, Huihui Wang, Ting Sang and Zhou Ye
Coatings 2022, 12(10), 1456; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings12101456 - 2 Oct 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1773
Abstract
Antimicrobial peptide (AMP) coatings are promising alternatives to conventional antibiotics for the prevention of medical device- and implant-associated infections. Compared to covalent immobilization methods, coatings relying on physical interactions are more versatile but usually less stable. Previous work has developed stable noncovalent coatings [...] Read more.
Antimicrobial peptide (AMP) coatings are promising alternatives to conventional antibiotics for the prevention of medical device- and implant-associated infections. Compared to covalent immobilization methods, coatings relying on physical interactions are more versatile but usually less stable. Previous work has developed stable noncovalent coatings on titanium and hydroxyapatite with a model AMP, GL13K, leveraging the strong hydrogen bonding between β-sheet-formed self-assemblies and polar substrates. In this work, a different GL13K self-assembly process was triggered with the formation of α-helices in ethanol/water cosolvent. We compared three different coatings on titanium to investigate the roles of self-assembly and secondary structures, including free GL13K in unordered structures, self-assembled GL13K with the formation of α-helices, and self-assembled GL13K with the formation of β-sheets. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and water contact angle results confirmed the successful coatings of all three physiosorbed GL13K conditions. Self-assembled GL13K, either in α-helices or β-sheets, formed more effective antimicrobial coatings in killing Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus than free GL13K. These findings could help design more stable and effective antimicrobial coatings using self-assembled AMPs. Full article
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