Nanostructures for Biomedical Applications

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412). This special issue belongs to the section "Bioactive Coatings and Biointerfaces".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 October 2024 | Viewed by 2690

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
National Institute for Laser, Plasma and Radiation Physics, RO-077125 Magurele, Romania
Interests: thin films/coatings; laser deposition methods; organic/inorganic compounds for biomedical application; oxides thin films; hard coatings
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is dedicated to research with the aim of manufacturing nanostructures for surface’s functionalisation to be exploited in a wide spectrum of biological and medical applications.

Through a surface’s functionalization, new opportunities arise by extending the range of properties or even adding different functionalities, from antimicrobial effects to drug delivery vectors or from tissue engineering to innovative medical devices.

The most important approaches to functionalise surfaces are (i) by covering them with thin layer/multilayers/coatings and (ii) by texturing-applying methods ranging from laser irradiation to chemical corrosion.

We invite the scientific community to contribute new/original research articles and reviews describing the relevant properties for the biomedical field, synthesis, and characterization of nanostructures.

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Gabriela Dorcioman
Dr. Valentina Grumezescu
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • nanostructures
  • surface’s functionalisation
  • biocompatible materials
  • antimicrobial
  • medical devices

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 1604 KiB  
Article
Coating of Neural Electrodes with Platinum Nanoparticles Reduces and Stabilizes Impedance In Vitro and In Vivo in a Rat Model
by Svilen D. Angelov, Christoph Rehbock, Vaijayanthi Ramesh, Hans E. Heissler, Mesbah Alam, Stephan Barcikowski, Kerstin Schwabe and Joachim K. Krauss
Coatings 2024, 14(3), 352; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings14030352 - 15 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1062
Abstract
The efficacy of electrodes that are chronically implanted and used in the context of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of neurological disorders critically depends on stable impedance. Platinum–iridium electrodes were coated with laser-generated platinum nanoparticle colloids (PtNPs) via electrophoretic deposition using [...] Read more.
The efficacy of electrodes that are chronically implanted and used in the context of deep brain stimulation (DBS) for the treatment of neurological disorders critically depends on stable impedance. Platinum–iridium electrodes were coated with laser-generated platinum nanoparticle colloids (PtNPs) via electrophoretic deposition using pulsed direct currents (DC-EPD). Uncoated electrodes were used as controls. In vitro, electrodes were stimulated for four weeks in a 0.9% NaCl solution. For the in vivo (rats) study, coated electrodes were implanted in the left and uncoated control electrodes in the right subthalamic nucleus (STN). After two weeks of recovery, electrodes were stimulated for four weeks. Impedance measurements were conducted after each week of stimulation, both in vivo and in vitro. NP-coating resulted in a significant and long-lasting reduction in electrode impedance (p < 0.05) over four weeks of in vitro stimulation. Despite an initial increase in impedance after intracranial implantation, the impedance of the NP-coated electrodes was also reduced during in vivo stimulation over four weeks. NP-coated electrodes had a lower fluctuation of impedance during stimulation compared to uncoated electrodes both in vitro and in vivo (p < 0.05). Laser-generated PtNPs applied to electrodes by pulsed DC-EPD lead to lower and more stable electrode impedance during chronic stimulation, with the potential to enhance the performance of DBS systems during chronic use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructures for Biomedical Applications)
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13 pages, 3921 KiB  
Article
Design and Fabrication of Nanofiber-Coated Antenna with Electrospun Polyacrylonitrile (PAN) for Tissue Cancer Ablation
by Mohamed S. Abdo, Ashraf Maher, Ahmed Fouly, Saud M. Almotairy, Muhammad A. Shar and Hany S. Abdo
Coatings 2023, 13(10), 1767; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings13101767 - 13 Oct 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1240
Abstract
Hepatocellular carcinoma (HC) is a common liver cancer often associated with chronic liver diseases such as hepatitis B and C-induced cirrhosis. Multiple treatments are available, including microwave ablation (MWA), which has proven effective. This is attributed to its proved ability to eliminate liver [...] Read more.
Hepatocellular carcinoma (HC) is a common liver cancer often associated with chronic liver diseases such as hepatitis B and C-induced cirrhosis. Multiple treatments are available, including microwave ablation (MWA), which has proven effective. This is attributed to its proved ability to eliminate liver tumors with a successful rate of more than 85%. However, in order to maintain healthy tissues and establish good ablation practicability, the temperature involved should be controlled. This can be achieved by monitoring different parameters including thermal conductivity, heat capacity, and blood perfusion. For this purpose, an antenna probe is usually employed to localize heat distributions and identify heating efficiency. Many types and shapes of antenna probes for MWA have been reported in different studies. Thus, in the current study, a numerical model is established to investigate the performance of the antenna based on its shape. A finite element model (FEM) was developed to examine the specific absorption rate (SAR), distribution of temperature, and coefficient of reflection. Closed and conventional single-slot antennas were targeted via this model. The antenna was then designed to have a reflection coefficient lower than 10 dB and heating of a spherical shape profile. The findings of the study can aid in determining the optimal parameters required for the highest effectiveness of MWA in the treatment of HC at early stages with the lowest amount of invasiveness and collateral harm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nanostructures for Biomedical Applications)
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