Special Issue "Advanced Coatings for Manufacturing Prosthetic Tubular Devices"

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412). This special issue belongs to the section "Surface Coatings for Biomedicine and Bioengineering".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2021) | Viewed by 5945

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Anton Ficai
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Science and Engineering of Oxide Materials and Nanomaterials, Faculty of Applied Chemistry and Materials Science, University POLITEHNICA of Bucharest, 011061 Bucharest, Romania
Interests: bio(nano)materials; synthesis methods; materials processing and design; advanced coatings; tissue engineering; drug delivery; characterization methods
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue is dedicated to highlighting the most recent progress achieved in the development of coatings on the surface of prosthetic tubular devices, especially stents and catheters.

Several years ago, cardiovascular diseases exceeded the number of deaths induced by cancers as the most important cause of death worldwide. In many cardiovascular diseases, the use of stents and catheters is essential and this is why research has intensified and important advances have been recorded. Advances in the field are assured by exploiting coating technologies, with the developed coatings being able to change major surface properties (such as biocompatibility, hemocompatibility, antiadhesive and antibiofilm capacity, etc.), which strongly influence the performance of these prosthetic tubular devices.

Many deposition techniques have recently been developed or improved, some of them being suitable for the coating of these devices, even for the coating of the stents, which, compared to other prosthetic tubular devices, have very complex geometry. Among these techniques, physical and chemical deposition techniques such as pulsed laser deposition (PLD), sputtering techniques, matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE), dip coating, sol-gel, and electrochemical deposition techniques are some of the most exploited techniques for designing coated stents. Special attention will be paid to some characteristics such as anti-adherent, anti-encrustation, antimicrobial, antibiofilm, and antitumoral activities induced by the coating or due to the release of biologically active agents.

For this Special Issue, short communications/letters, original papers, and reviews are welcome dealing with coated prosthetic tubular devices, especially stents and catheters.

Potential topics:

The aim of this Special Issue is to serve as a forum for specialists, students, as well as papers in the following concepts regarding multifunctional coatings on the surface of the prosthetic tubular devices, especially stents and catheters:

  • Mono-component or composite coatings for prosthetic tubular devices;
  • Anti-adherent, anti-encrustation, antimicrobial, antibiofilm or antitumoral coatings;
  • Drug eluting coatings.

Prof. Dr. Anton Ficai
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Prosthetic tubular devices: Stents and Catheters
  • Design and manufacturing
  • Multifunctional coatings
  • Surface treatment
  • Resorbable versus non-resorbable prosthetic tubular devices

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Core/Shell Glycine-Polyvinyl Alcohol/Polycaprolactone Nanofibrous Membrane Intended for Guided Bone Regeneration: Development and Characterization
Coatings 2021, 11(9), 1130; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings11091130 - 17 Sep 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 965
Abstract
Glycine (Gly), which is the simplest amino acid, induces the inflammation response and enhances bone mass density, and particularly its β polymorph has superior mechanical and piezoelectric properties. Therefore, electrospinning of Gly with any polymer, including polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), has a great potential [...] Read more.
Glycine (Gly), which is the simplest amino acid, induces the inflammation response and enhances bone mass density, and particularly its β polymorph has superior mechanical and piezoelectric properties. Therefore, electrospinning of Gly with any polymer, including polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), has a great potential in biomedical applications, such as guided bone regeneration (GBR) application. However, their application is limited due to a fast degradation rate and undesirable mechanical and physical properties. Therefore, encapsulation of Gly and PVA fiber within a poly(ε-caprolactone) (PCL) shell provides a slower degradation rate and improves the mechanical, chemical, and physical properties. A membrane intended for GBR application is a barrier membrane used to guide alveolar bone regeneration by preventing fast-proliferating cells from growing into the bone defect site. In the present work, a core/shell nanofibrous membrane, composed of PCL as shell and PVA:Gly as core, was developed utilizing the coaxial electrospinning technique and characterized morphologically, mechanically, physically, chemically, and thermally. Moreover, the characterization results of the core/shell membrane were compared to monolithic electrospun PCL, PVA, and PVA:Gly fibrous membranes. The results showed that the core-shell membrane appears to be a good candidate for GBR application with a nano-scale fiber of 412 ± 82 nm and microscale pore size of 6.803 ± 0.035 μm. Moreover, the wettability of 47.4 ± 2.2° contact angle (C.A) and mechanical properties of 135 ± 3.05 MPa average modulus of elasticity, 4.57 ± 0.04 MPa average ultimate tensile stress (UTS), and 39.43% ± 0.58% average elongation at break are desirable and suitable for GBR application. Furthermore, the X-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results exhibited the formation of β-Gly. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Coatings for Manufacturing Prosthetic Tubular Devices)
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Article
Shoulder Implant Manufacturer Detection by Using Deep Learning: Proposed Channel Selection Layer
Coatings 2021, 11(3), 346; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings11030346 - 18 Mar 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 880
Abstract
Total Shoulder Arthroplasty (TSA) is the process of replacing the damaged ball and socket joint in the shoulder with a prosthesis made with polyethylene and metal components. After this procedure, intervention may be required as a result of damage to the prosthesis, except [...] Read more.
Total Shoulder Arthroplasty (TSA) is the process of replacing the damaged ball and socket joint in the shoulder with a prosthesis made with polyethylene and metal components. After this procedure, intervention may be required as a result of damage to the prosthesis, except for the need for an examination regarding the prosthesis at certain periods. If the patient does not have information about the model and manufacturer of the prosthesis, the treatment process is delayed. Artificial intelligence-assisted systems can speed up the treatment process by classifying the manufacturer and model of the prosthesis. In this study, artificial intelligence methods were applied to classify shoulder implants using X-ray images. The model and manufacturer of the prosthesis is detected by using the proposed deep learning method. Besides, the most commonly used machine learning classifiers were applied for the same problem to compare the results and show the effectiveness of the proposed method. In addition, the accuracy and precision analysis and measurements of the processing times for the applied methods were performed to reveal the performance, accuracy, and efficiency of the study. In order to measure the performance of the proposed method, it was compared with studies on the same problem in the literature. As a result of the comparison, it was found that the proposed method, with an accuracy rate of 97.2%, performed better than the other studies. In the study, the implant manufacturer and model are classified in order to carry out the implant surgery process in the best way with the proposed deep learning model. With the success of the proposed system, the applicability of this model in similar prosthesis classifications has been shown. Differently from the studies in the literature, the channel selection formula is presented in the proposed deep learning method recommended for selecting the most distinctive feature filters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Coatings for Manufacturing Prosthetic Tubular Devices)
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Review

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Review
Bioactive Glass—An Extensive Study of the Preparation and Coating Methods
Coatings 2021, 11(11), 1386; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings11111386 - 13 Nov 2021
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 841
Abstract
Diseases or complications that are caused by bone tissue damage affect millions of patients every year. Orthopedic and dental implants have become important treatment options for replacing and repairing missing or damaged parts of bones and teeth. In order to use a material [...] Read more.
Diseases or complications that are caused by bone tissue damage affect millions of patients every year. Orthopedic and dental implants have become important treatment options for replacing and repairing missing or damaged parts of bones and teeth. In order to use a material in the manufacture of implants, the material must meet several requirements, such as mechanical stability, elasticity, biocompatibility, hydrophilicity, corrosion resistance, and non-toxicity. In the 1970s, a biocompatible glassy material called bioactive glass was discovered. At a later time, several glass materials with similar properties were developed. This material has a big potential to be used in formulating medical devices, but its fragility is an important disadvantage. The use of bioactive glasses in the form of coatings on metal substrates allows the combination of the mechanical hardness of the metal and the biocompatibility of the bioactive glass. In this review, an extensive study of the literature was conducted regarding the preparation methods of bioactive glass and the different techniques of coating on various substrates, such as stainless steel, titanium, and their alloys. Furthermore, the main doping agents that can be used to impart special properties to the bioactive glass coatings are described. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Coatings for Manufacturing Prosthetic Tubular Devices)
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Review
Customized Therapeutic Surface Coatings for Dental Implants
Coatings 2020, 10(6), 568; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10060568 - 17 Jun 2020
Cited by 16 | Viewed by 2504
Abstract
Dental implants are frequently used to support fixed or removable dental prostheses to replace missing teeth. The clinical success of titanium dental implants is owed to the exceptional biocompatibility and osseointegration with the bone. Therefore, the enhanced therapeutic effectiveness of dental implants had [...] Read more.
Dental implants are frequently used to support fixed or removable dental prostheses to replace missing teeth. The clinical success of titanium dental implants is owed to the exceptional biocompatibility and osseointegration with the bone. Therefore, the enhanced therapeutic effectiveness of dental implants had always been preferred. Several concepts for implant coating and local drug delivery had been developed during the last decades. A drug is generally released by diffusion-controlled, solvent-controlled, and chemical controlled methods. Although a range of surface modifications and coatings (antimicrobial, bioactive, therapeutic drugs) have been explored for dental implants, it is still a long way from designing sophisticated therapeutic implant surfaces to achieve the specific needs of dental patients. The present article reviews various interdisciplinary aspects of surface coatings on dental implants from the perspectives of biomaterials, coatings, drug release, and related therapeutic effects. Additionally, the various types of implant coatings, localized drug release from coatings, and how released agents influence the bone–implant surface interface characteristics are discussed. This paper also highlights several strategies for local drug delivery and their limitations in dental implant coatings as some of these concepts are yet to be applied in clinical settings due to the specific requirements of individual patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advanced Coatings for Manufacturing Prosthetic Tubular Devices)
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