10th Anniversary of Children: Pediatric Dentistry Progress

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Pediatric Dentistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2024 | Viewed by 9535

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Multidisciplinary Department of Medical-Surgical and Dental Specialties, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, Via Luigi De Crecchio, 6, 80138 Naples, Italy
Interests: early treatment; non-extraction treatment; cleft lip and palate; genetics

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Guest Editor
Department of Medical-Surgical and Dental Specialties, University of Campania Luigi Vanvitelli, 80100 Naples, Italy
Interests: impacted canine; early treatment; dentofacial orthopedics; cleft lip and palate
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In the last few years, new diagnostic and therapeutic approaches have been developed in pediatric dentistry, meaning that researchers and clinicians must keep up with all the developments that are occurring in this field.

New technologies, as well as digital devices, are available to enhance the effectiveness of the diagnostic process and increase the spectrum of detectable pathologies, dimorphisms, and dysfunctions in the orofacial region in children.

The aim and scope of our Special Issue is to promote research in all aspects of pediatric dentistry, including interceptive orthodontics and studies on children and young adults with special needs.

Works on oral pathologies, orthodontic and orthopedic early treatments, maxillo-facial surgery, otolaryngology procedures, reconstructive dentistry as well as sleep apnea syndrome treatment will all be well received.

The Special Issue focuses on the publication and critical evaluation of clinical and basic science research. Studies with innovative approaches or providing original information are of higher priority.

In this regard, we are delighted to invite investigators to submit original research articles (trials, cohort studies, case–control and cross-sectional studies), high-quality case reports, communications and reviews (narrative or systematic reviews and meta-analyses) in accordance with the fields previously indicated.

Prof. Dr. Letizia Perillo
Dr. Vincenzo Grassia
Dr. Ludovica Nucci
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • early treatment
  • pediatric dentistry
  • growing problems
  • skeletal anomalies
  • pediatric oral neoformation

Published Papers (8 papers)

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13 pages, 3774 KiB  
Article
Morphometric Comparison and Prognostic Analysis of Permanent Maxillary Central Incisors with Eruption Disturbances—A Cross-Sectional Study
by Yuri Jeong, Jonghyun Shin, Soyoung Park, Taesung Jeong and Eungyung Lee
Children 2024, 11(3), 307; https://doi.org/10.3390/children11030307 - 5 Mar 2024
Viewed by 625
Abstract
Aims: The aim of this study was to retrospectively compare the morphometrics of permanent maxillary central incisors with and without eruption disturbances, while simultaneously evaluating prognosis based on different factors. Materials and Methods: Seventy patients with unilateral permanent maxillary central incisor eruption disturbances [...] Read more.
Aims: The aim of this study was to retrospectively compare the morphometrics of permanent maxillary central incisors with and without eruption disturbances, while simultaneously evaluating prognosis based on different factors. Materials and Methods: Seventy patients with unilateral permanent maxillary central incisor eruption disturbances were included. Within a group of 70 subjects, measurements were taken for both normally erupted central incisors and central incisors with eruption disturbances to determine the length of the roots and the volume of the teeth. Various factors, such as angulation of impaction, and vertical height of impaction, were assessed to investigate their correlation with surgical intervention. Results: Both the root length and tooth volume were significantly smaller in the eruption disturbance incisors than in the normally erupted incisors (p ≤ 0.001). Moreover, there was a statistically significant increase in surgical intervention among cases with no clear physical barrier (primary retention) (p < 0.05) or when adjacent normally erupted central incisors exhibited more than 2/3 of root development (p < 0.05). Conclusions: The results of this study numerically demonstrated the delayed tooth development of the permanent maxillary central incisors with unilateral eruption disturbances compared to appropriately erupted incisors by measuring root length and tooth volume. The absence of obstacles and the degree of root development in adjacent erupted incisors might serve as factors for clinicians to determine the necessity and timing of surgical intervention. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 10th Anniversary of Children: Pediatric Dentistry Progress)
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12 pages, 234 KiB  
Article
Analysis of General Knowledge on Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome (OSAS) among Italian Pediatricians
by Stefano Saran, Sabina Saccomanno, Simonetta Viti, Rodolfo Francesco Mastrapasqua, Grazia Viti, Nicola Giannotta, Paola Fioretti, Elisa Lorenzini, Luca Raffaelli and Luca Levrini
Children 2024, 11(2), 148; https://doi.org/10.3390/children11020148 - 24 Jan 2024
Viewed by 759
Abstract
Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a disorder characterized by partial or total airway obstruction during sleep. Studies have shown variability in the level of knowledge and awareness about OSAS among pediatricians. The management of childhood obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) depends [...] Read more.
Introduction: Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a disorder characterized by partial or total airway obstruction during sleep. Studies have shown variability in the level of knowledge and awareness about OSAS among pediatricians. The management of childhood obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) depends on the severity of the disease, the presence of comorbidities, and the child’s age. The American Pediatric Academy recommends a multidisciplinary approach involving a pediatrician, a sleep specialist, and an otolaryngologist to provide comprehensive care for children with OSAS. The aim of this cross-sectional study is to evaluate the level of knowledge among pediatricians in Italy regarding the diagnosis of pediatric OSAS. Material and Methods: An anonymized survey was conducted among Italian pediatricians. The survey was administered electronically using Google Forms, and a total of 350 pediatricians were invited to participate. Out of the 350 invitations, 299 pediatricians responded to the survey. The statistical analysis performed consisted of descriptive analysis. The study included 297 pediatricians. Results: Pediatricians demonstrated proficiency in identifying common nocturnal and day symptoms of OSAS. A majority (68.9%) considered the oral and otorhinolaryngologist areas during checkups. Approximately 70.6% took patient weight into account, and 62.8% were aware of the regional diagnostic-therapeutic-assistance pathway. Conclusions: According to the results of this manuscript, there is evidence of a good level of knowledge about OSAS, but disseminating more information about OSAS and all the health issues associated with this syndrome is suggested. This study also has limitations caused by the complexity of the pathology. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 10th Anniversary of Children: Pediatric Dentistry Progress)
11 pages, 266 KiB  
Article
Prevalence and Associated Factors of Dental Caries in Syrian Immigrant Children Aged 6–12 Years
by Zeynep Meva Altaş and Mehmet Akif Sezerol
Children 2023, 10(6), 1000; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10061000 - 2 Jun 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1226
Abstract
Immigrant children are among the groups that are sensitive to problems related to dental health. The aim of this study was to examine the dental caries of Syrian immigrant children. The study is a descriptive and retrospective study. Its population consists of Syrian [...] Read more.
Immigrant children are among the groups that are sensitive to problems related to dental health. The aim of this study was to examine the dental caries of Syrian immigrant children. The study is a descriptive and retrospective study. Its population consists of Syrian immigrant children aged 6–12 years who were screened for dental health in the year 2022 in Istanbul. DMF-T (permanent teeth) and dmf-t (milk teeth) indices were used, which are the (t-T) criteria obtained by dividing the sum of caries (d-D), caries extracted (m-M) and caries-filled (f-F) teeth by the number of people examined. Higher dmft and DMFT scores indicate worse dental health. Dental screening was performed on 549 Syrian immigrant children. In total, 27.2% (n = 149) were brushing their teeth once a day and 97.3% of the children (n = 534) had at least one decayed tooth. The dmft score for the 6–7 year age (6.45 ± 3.33) group was significantly higher than the 8–9 year (4.98 ± 2.78) and 10–12 year (3.22 ± 2.02) age groups (p < 0.001). In our study, the dental caries were seen at a very-high frequency among immigrant children and the habit of tooth brushing remains at a low level. Lower age was the relevant factor for dental caries in our study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 10th Anniversary of Children: Pediatric Dentistry Progress)
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10 pages, 479 KiB  
Article
The Prevalence of Developmental Enamel Defects in Israeli Children and Its Association with Perinatal Conditions: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Gisela Berenstein Ajzman, Nurit Dagon, Rabea Iraqi, Sigalit Blumer and Shada Fadela
Children 2023, 10(5), 903; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10050903 - 19 May 2023
Viewed by 1065
Abstract
Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) and deciduous molar hypomineralization (DMH) affect the first permanent molars and second primary molars, respectively, causing a greater dental treatment burden and worse oral health quality of life among affected children. We assessed the prevalence and risk factors of [...] Read more.
Molar incisor hypomineralization (MIH) and deciduous molar hypomineralization (DMH) affect the first permanent molars and second primary molars, respectively, causing a greater dental treatment burden and worse oral health quality of life among affected children. We assessed the prevalence and risk factors of MIH and DMH among 1209 children aged 3–13 years who attended a university dental clinic in Israel in 2019–2020. Clinical examinations were conducted to assess the presence of DMH and MIH. Potential etiological factors of MIH and DMH, including demographics, the mother’s perinatal health, and the child’s medical history during the first three years of life, were retrieved using a questionnaire. To examine the associations between the demographic and clinical variables and the prevalence of MIH and DMH, continuous variables were tested using the Kruskal–Wallis test with Bonferroni corrections. Categorical variables were analyzed by chi-squared test. Multivariate logistic regression was conducted to evaluate which of the significant variables found in the univariate analysis could predict a diagnosis of both MIH and DMH. The prevalence of MIH and DMH was 10.3% and 6.0%, respectively. Age ≥ 5 years, taking medications during pregnancy and severe lesions were associated with a greater risk for a diagnosis of DMH + MIH. Multivariate logistic regression with adjustment for age showed that the severity of hypomineralization was positively and significantly associated with a diagnosis of MIH + DMH with an odds ratio of 4.18 (95% confidence interval 1.26–17.16), p = 0.03. MIH should be diagnosed and monitored in young children to prevent further deterioration. Moreover, a preventive and restorative program for MIH should be established. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 10th Anniversary of Children: Pediatric Dentistry Progress)
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11 pages, 285 KiB  
Article
Benign Pediatric Jawbone Lesions: A 10-Year Clinical and Radiological Pilot Study
by Emil Crasnean, Alina Ban, Mihaela Hedeșiu, Raluca Roman, Cristian Dinu, Mihaela Băciuț, Sergiu Văcăraș, Ileana Mitre, Oana Almășan, Vlad-I. Nechita, Gabriel Armencea, Simion Bran and Florin Onișor
Children 2023, 10(2), 335; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10020335 - 9 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1428
Abstract
This study aimed at presenting a retrospective longitudinal analysis of the pediatric jaw lesions treated at the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinic in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, over a timeframe of ten years (2012 to 2022). The clinical and radiological characteristics of the jawbone lesions, [...] Read more.
This study aimed at presenting a retrospective longitudinal analysis of the pediatric jaw lesions treated at the Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery Clinic in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, over a timeframe of ten years (2012 to 2022). The clinical and radiological characteristics of the jawbone lesions, the treatment outcome, and the recurrence incidence were described. All consecutive patients aged below 18 years, with histologically diagnosed odontogenic tumors (OTs), nonodontogenic tumors (non-OTs), or odontogenic cysts (OCs) were included. Age, dentition type, clinical symptoms, preoperative and postoperative radiological tests, histological diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up information one year following the diagnoses were all examined. Eighty-two cases were included. The ratio of men to women was 1.15:1, with the mandible predominating by 64.4%. Inflammatory radicular cysts predominated in 31.7% of cases. A total of 42.68% of the patients were asymptomatic. Enucleation was the most frequent surgical technique (45.1%), followed by cystectomies (28%) and marsupialization (14.6%). The overall recurrence rate was 7.3%; the most recurrent histopathological lesion was the odontogenic keratocyst. This study sheds new light on the clinical and radiological characteristics, treatment outcomes, and recurrence rate of juvenile jawbone lesions in children and adolescents. The diagnosis and treatment of jawbone lesions in children and adolescents can be enhanced with the use of epidemiological, clinical, and imagistic information. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 10th Anniversary of Children: Pediatric Dentistry Progress)
11 pages, 284 KiB  
Article
Assessment of Orthodontic Treatment Need and Oral Health-Related Quality of Life in Asthmatic Children Aged 11 to 14 Years Old: A Cross-Sectional Study
by Adrián Curto, Fátima Mihit, Daniel Curto and Alberto Albaladejo
Children 2023, 10(2), 176; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10020176 - 18 Jan 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1507
Abstract
This study investigated the need for orthodontic treatment in asthmatic children aged 11 to 14 years and how the treatment affected their oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at the dental clinic of the University [...] Read more.
This study investigated the need for orthodontic treatment in asthmatic children aged 11 to 14 years and how the treatment affected their oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). Materials and Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted at the dental clinic of the University of Salamanca in 2020–2022. The study selected a consecutive sample of 140 children with asthma (52.1% girls; 47.9% boys). This study used the Orthodontic Treatment Needs Index (OTN) to analyze the need for orthodontic treatment and the Children’s Perception Questionnaire (CPQ11–14) to assess OHRQoL. Results: Sex and age did not significantly influence the need for orthodontic treatment, although age may be considered influential for OHRQoL concerning oral symptoms (p < 0.01), functional limitations (p < 0.05), and total score on the CPQ11–14 questionnaire (p < 0.05): the younger the age, the greater the effect of the need for orthodontic treatment on OHRQoL. The social well-being of the patients was much more significantly impacted by the need for orthodontic treatment (15.7 ± 1.91) than by oral symptoms (7.64 ± 1.39), which were the least impacted. In all parts of the CPQ11–14 questionnaire and in the patients’ total scores, we observed significant agreement (p < 0.01) that treatment influenced OHRQoL. Conclusion: An inverse relationship exists between the severity of the treatment needed and OHRQoL. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 10th Anniversary of Children: Pediatric Dentistry Progress)
9 pages, 859 KiB  
Article
Large-Scale Survey of Missing Deciduous Anterior Teeth on Medical Examination at the Age of 3.5 Years
by Tsutomu Otsuchi, Yuko Ogaya, Yuto Suehiro, Rena Okawa and Kazuhiko Nakano
Children 2022, 9(11), 1761; https://doi.org/10.3390/children9111761 - 16 Nov 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1108
Abstract
Tooth anomalies in childhood may negatively affect the healthy development of the dentition and occlusion; hence, it is important to examine the actual oral condition at an early stage. The present study was performed to understand the state of missing deciduous anterior teeth [...] Read more.
Tooth anomalies in childhood may negatively affect the healthy development of the dentition and occlusion; hence, it is important to examine the actual oral condition at an early stage. The present study was performed to understand the state of missing deciduous anterior teeth in children aged 3.5 years who underwent dental checkups in Matsubara City. In total, 3508 children received oral examinations, and items such as erupted deciduous teeth and teeth anomalies were recorded. Among these children, those with missing anterior deciduous teeth were selected, and their details were analyzed. In the 216 children, there were 266 missing anterior deciduous teeth. Congenitally missing anterior deciduous teeth were observed in 80 children, and fused teeth were observed in 128 children. The missing teeth were predominantly located in the mandible and occurred more frequently on the right side. The most common reason for acquired missing teeth was trauma, and no cases of spontaneous loss due to systemic disease were found in this study. Screening for various tooth anomalies is expected to play an important role in cultivating a better understanding of the oral cavity of children, developing healthy dentitions, and contributing to the early detection of some systemic diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 10th Anniversary of Children: Pediatric Dentistry Progress)
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16 pages, 611 KiB  
Systematic Review
Pain during Rapid Maxillary Expansion: A Systematic Review
by Martina Barone, Alberto De Stefani, Filippo Cavallari, Antonio Gracco and Giovanni Bruno
Children 2023, 10(4), 666; https://doi.org/10.3390/children10040666 - 31 Mar 2023
Viewed by 1147
Abstract
Aim: The aim of the present systematic review is to evaluate the pain perceived by patients during rapid maxillary expansion (RME) in relation to factors such as demographic characteristics, appliance type, activation protocol, and the eventual use of medication or pain management strategies. [...] Read more.
Aim: The aim of the present systematic review is to evaluate the pain perceived by patients during rapid maxillary expansion (RME) in relation to factors such as demographic characteristics, appliance type, activation protocol, and the eventual use of medication or pain management strategies. Materials and methods: An electronic search of available articles on the subject was conducted on three electronic databases, using predefined keywords. Sequential screenings based on pre-established eligibility criteria were performed. Results: Ten studies were ultimately included in this systematic review. The main data of the reviewed studies were extracted according to the PICOS approach. Conclusions: Pain is a common effect of RME treatment that tends to decrease over time. Gender and age differences in pain perception are not clear. Perceived pain is influenced by the expander design and expansion protocol used. Some pain management strategies can be useful for reducing RME-associated pain. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue 10th Anniversary of Children: Pediatric Dentistry Progress)
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