Special Issue "Pluripotent Stem Cells for Regenerative Medicine"

A special issue of Cells (ISSN 2073-4409). This special issue belongs to the section "Stem Cells".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 May 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Claudia Spits
Website
Guest Editor
Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels, Belgium
Interests: human pluripotent stem cells; genome instability; aneuploidy; differentiation capacity; tumorigenesis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Human pluripotent stem cells are slowly but steadily transitioning from bench to bedside, with the first clinical trials showing promising results. Nevertheless, the spectrum of potentially treatable conditions is still limited, and issues such as genome instability and suboptimal differentiation are significant hurdles to the safe transition of these cells to the clinic.

This Special Issue welcomes manuscripts providing insight on aspects relevant to the use of hPSC in regenerative medicine. We are interested in a wide range of work, including differentiation to novel cell types or improvement on existing cell types, and their preclinical testing. Work on biomaterials and scaffolding, with an eye for tissue engineering are also key for advanced hPSC-based therapy. Finally, work on safety, such as addressing the tumorigenic potential of hPSC-derived products, and scalability aspects, such as cell culture, are essential for the successful clinical application of these cells.

Prof. Dr. Claudia Spits
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cells is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • regenerative medicine
  • hPSC
  • differentiation
  • clinical testing
  • tissue engineering
  • genome integrity
  • tumorigenicity
  • safety
  • cell culture

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Generation of Functional Vascular Endothelial Cells and Pericytes from Keratinocyte Derived Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells
Cells 2021, 10(1), 74; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10010074 - 05 Jan 2021
Abstract
Human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived endothelial cells (ECs) and pericytes provide a powerful tool for cardiovascular disease modelling, personalized drug testing, translational medicine, and tissue engineering. Here, we report a novel differentiation protocol that results in the fast and efficient production of [...] Read more.
Human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived endothelial cells (ECs) and pericytes provide a powerful tool for cardiovascular disease modelling, personalized drug testing, translational medicine, and tissue engineering. Here, we report a novel differentiation protocol that results in the fast and efficient production of ECs and pericytes from keratinocyte-derived hiPSCs. We found that the implementation of a 3D embryoid body (EB) stage significantly improves the differentiation efficiency. Compared with the monolayer-based technique, our protocol yields a distinct EC population with higher levels of EC marker expression such as CD31 and vascular endothelial cadherin (VE-cadherin). Furthermore, the EB-based protocol allows the generation of functional EC and pericyte populations that can promote blood vessel-like structure formation upon co-culturing. Moreover, we demonstrate that the EB-based ECs and pericytes can be successfully used in a microfluidic chip model, forming a stable 3D microvascular network. Overall, the described protocol can be used to efficiently differentiate both ECs and pericytes with distinct and high marker expression from keratinocyte-derived hiPSCs, providing a potent source material for future cardiovascular disease studies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pluripotent Stem Cells for Regenerative Medicine)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Towards a Functional Cure for Diabetes Using Stem Cell-Derived Beta Cells: Are We There Yet?
Cells 2021, 10(1), 191; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10010191 - 19 Jan 2021
Abstract
Diabetes mellitus is a pandemic metabolic disorder that results from either the autoimmune destruction or the dysfunction of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. A promising cure is beta cell replacement through the transplantation of islets of Langerhans. However, donor shortage hinders the widespread implementation [...] Read more.
Diabetes mellitus is a pandemic metabolic disorder that results from either the autoimmune destruction or the dysfunction of insulin-producing pancreatic beta cells. A promising cure is beta cell replacement through the transplantation of islets of Langerhans. However, donor shortage hinders the widespread implementation of this therapy. Human pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, represent an attractive alternative beta cell source for transplantation. Although major advances over the past two decades have led to the generation of stem cell-derived beta-like cells that share many features with genuine beta cells, producing fully mature beta cells remains challenging. Here, we review the current status of beta cell differentiation protocols and highlight specific challenges that are associated with producing mature beta cells. We address the challenges and opportunities that are offered by monogenic forms of diabetes. Finally, we discuss the remaining hurdles for clinical application of stem cell-derived beta cells and the status of ongoing clinical trials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Pluripotent Stem Cells for Regenerative Medicine)
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