Special Issue "Biology of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) 2021"

A special issue of Cells (ISSN 2073-4409). This special issue belongs to the section "Cell Methods".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2021) | Viewed by 7214

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Sauerwein
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
1. Professor (retired), Radiation Oncology, University Hospital Essen, University Duisburg, Strahlenklinik, Hufelandstr 55, 45122 Essen, Germany
2. Specially Appointed Professor, Neutron Therapy Research Center, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530, Japan
3. President, German Society for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, 45122 Essen, Germany
Interests: radiation oncology; hadron therapy; Boron Neutron Capture therapy (BNCT); neutrons; High LET radiation; radiation biology; eye tumors; ophthalmic oncology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Mitsuko Masutani
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
1. Department of Molecular and Genomic Biomedicine, Center for Bioinformatics and Molecular Medicine, Nagasaki University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, 1-12-4 Sakamoto, Nagasaki 852-8523, Japan
2. Visiting Scientist, Central Radioisotope Division, National Cancer Center Research Institute, 5-1-1 Tsukiji, Chuo-ku, Tokyo 104-0045, Japan
Interests: radiation oncology; biology in anti-cancer treatment; poly ADP-ribosylation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Prof. John Hopewell
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Professor and Director (retired), Consultant Radiobiologist of Radiobiological Research at the University of Oxfords, Oxford OX1 2JD, UK
Interests: clinically oriented radiation biology
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The appearance of hospital-based epithermal neutron sources has made boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) a dedicated focus of innovative developments in radiation oncology. All future clinical applications have to be based on carefully performed pre-clinical investigations. At this very moment, it seems appropriate and important to collect results of recent preclinical and early clinical research and publish them together with intelligible and clear reviews of the most challenging aspects of BNCT.

This Special Issue of Cells is for contributions on all cytobiological aspects related to BNCT. You are invited to submit your contributions in the form of original research articles, reviews, or shorter perspective articles.

Relevant observations made at the cellular level could come from the following areas:

Radiation biology for BNCT;
Cell-based studies;
Preclinical animal studies;
Drug development for BNCT;
Impact of BNCT on the proteomic profile and omics approaches;
Boron imaging;
Mechanisms of action of BNCT;
Abscopal effect of BNCT;
Early clinical trials;
Biomarkers for therapeutic optimization.

Prof. Wolfgang Sauerwein
Prof. Mitsuko Masutani
Prof. John Hopewell
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
A Novel Boron Lipid to Modify Liposomal Surfaces for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy
Cells 2021, 10(12), 3421; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10123421 - 05 Dec 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1437
Abstract
Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a cancer treatment with clinically demonstrated efficacy using boronophenylalanine (BPA) and sodium mercaptododecaborate (BSH). However, tumor tissue selectivity of BSH and retention of BPA in tumor cells is a constant problem. To ensure boron accumulation and retention [...] Read more.
Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a cancer treatment with clinically demonstrated efficacy using boronophenylalanine (BPA) and sodium mercaptododecaborate (BSH). However, tumor tissue selectivity of BSH and retention of BPA in tumor cells is a constant problem. To ensure boron accumulation and retention in tumor tissues, we designed a novel polyethylene glycol (PEG)-based boron-containing lipid (PBL) and examined the potency of delivery of boron using novel PBL-containing liposomes, facilitated by the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. PBL was synthesized by the reaction of distearoylphosphoethanolamine and BSH linked by PEG with Michael addition while liposomes modified using PBL were prepared from the mixed lipid at a constant molar ratio. In this manner, novel boron liposomes featuring BSH in the liposomal surfaces, instead of being encapsulated in the inner aqueous phase or incorporated in the lipid bilayer membrane, were prepared. These PBL liposomes also carry additional payload capacity for more boron compounds (or anticancer agents) in their inner aqueous phase. The findings demonstrated that PBL liposomes are promising candidates to effect suitable boron accumulation for BNCT. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biology of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) 2021)
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Review

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Review
Response of Normal Tissues to Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) with 10B-Borocaptate Sodium (BSH) and 10B-Paraboronophenylalanine (BPA)
Cells 2021, 10(11), 2883; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10112883 - 26 Oct 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1494
Abstract
Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a cancer-selective radiotherapy that utilizes the cancer targeting 10B-compound. Cancer cells that take up the compound are substantially damaged by the high liner energy transfer (LET) particles emitted mainly from the 10B(n, α7Li [...] Read more.
Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a cancer-selective radiotherapy that utilizes the cancer targeting 10B-compound. Cancer cells that take up the compound are substantially damaged by the high liner energy transfer (LET) particles emitted mainly from the 10B(n, α7Li reaction. BNCT can minimize the dose to normal tissues, but it must be performed within the tolerable range of normal tissues. Therefore, it is important to evaluate the response of normal tissues to BNCT. Since BNCT yields a mixture of high and low LET radiations that make it difficult to understand the radiobiological basis of BNCT, it is important to evaluate the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) and compound biological effectiveness (CBE) factors for assessing the responses of normal tissues to BNCT. BSH and BPA are the only 10B-compounds that can be used for clinical BNCT. Their biological behavior and cancer targeting mechanisms are different; therefore, they affect the CBE values differently. In this review, we present the RBE and CBE values of BPA or BSH for normal tissue damage by BNCT irradiation. The skin, brain (spinal cord), mucosa, lung, and liver are included as normal tissues. The CBE values of BPA and BSH for tumor control are also discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biology of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) 2021)
Review
Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) for Cutaneous Malignant Melanoma Using 10B-p-Boronophenylalanine (BPA) with Special Reference to the Radiobiological Basis and Clinical Results
Cells 2021, 10(11), 2881; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10112881 - 26 Oct 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 1622
Abstract
BNCT is a radiotherapeutic method for cancer treatment that uses tumor-targeting 10B-compounds. BNCT for cutaneous melanoma using BPA, a phenylalanine derivative, was first initiated by Mishima et al. in 1987. This article reviews the radiobiological basis of melanoma control and damage to [...] Read more.
BNCT is a radiotherapeutic method for cancer treatment that uses tumor-targeting 10B-compounds. BNCT for cutaneous melanoma using BPA, a phenylalanine derivative, was first initiated by Mishima et al. in 1987. This article reviews the radiobiological basis of melanoma control and damage to normal tissues as well as the results of clinical studies. Experimental studies showed that the compound biological effectiveness (CBE) values of the 10B (n, α)7Li reaction for melanoma control ranged from 2.5 to 3.3. The CBE values of the 10B (n, α)7Li reaction for skin damage ranged from 2.4 to 3.7 with moist desquamation as the endpoint. The required single radiation dose for controlling human melanoma was estimated to be 25 Gy-Eq or more by analyzing the 50% tumor control dose data of conventional fractionated radiotherapy. From the literature, the maximum permissible dose to human skin by single irradiation was estimated to be 18 Gy-Eq. With respect to the pharmacokinetics of BPA in patients with melanoma treated with 85–350 mg/kg BPA, the melanoma-to-blood ratio ranged from 2.1–3.8 and the skin-to-blood ratio was 1.31 ± 0.22. Good local tumor control and long-term survival of the patients were achieved in two clinical trials of BNCT conducted in Japan. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biology of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) 2021)
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Review
Development of an Imaging Technique for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy
Cells 2021, 10(8), 2135; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells10082135 - 19 Aug 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1753
Abstract
The development of 4-10B-borono-2-18F-fluoro-L-phenylalanine (18FBPA) for use in positron emission tomography (PET) has contributed to the progress of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). 18FBPA has shown similar pharmacokinetics and distribution to 4-10B-borono-L-phenylalanine (BPA) under [...] Read more.
The development of 4-10B-borono-2-18F-fluoro-L-phenylalanine (18FBPA) for use in positron emission tomography (PET) has contributed to the progress of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT). 18FBPA has shown similar pharmacokinetics and distribution to 4-10B-borono-L-phenylalanine (BPA) under various conditions in many animal studies. 18FBPA PET is useful for treatment indication. A higher 18FBPA accumulation ratio of the tumor to the surrounding normal tissue (T/N ratio) indicates that a superior treatment effect is expected. In clinical settings, a T/N ratio of higher than 2.5 or 3 is often used for patient selection. Moreover, 18FBPA PET is useful for predicting the 10B concentration delivered to the tumor and surrounding normal tissues, enabling high-precision treatment planning. Precise dose prediction using 18FBPA PET data has greatly improved the treatment accuracy of BNCT. However, the methodology used for the data analysis of 18FBPA PET findings varies; thus, data should be evaluated using a consistent methodology so as to be more reliable. In addition to PET applications, the development of 18FBPA as a contrast agent for magnetic resonance imaging that combines gadolinium and 10B is also in progress. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biology of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) 2021)
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