Special Issue "Novel Therapeutic Strategies for the Treatment of Brain Tumors"

A special issue of Cells (ISSN 2073-4409). This special issue belongs to the section "Cellular Pathology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 February 2023 | Viewed by 483

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Georg Karpel-Massler
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Neurological Surgery, Ulm University | UULM, Ulm, Germany
Interests: tumor cell metabolism; intelligent intracerebral implants; drug repurposing
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Mike-Andrew Westhoff
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine, University Medical Center Ulm, Ulm, Germany
Interests: cell adhesion and motility; evolution and cancer; drug repurposing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Malignant brain tumors constitute a major therapeutic challenge which is in part due to the heterogenous nature of the diseases and the very special microenvironment within the brain. As a consequence, first- and second-line therapies widely fail to provide satisfactory clinical outcomes in these patients urging the search for more efficient therapies.

This Special Issue on “Novel Therapeutic Strategies for the Treatment of Brain Tumors” aims to provide a summary of novel developments for the treatment of adult and pediatric brain tumors. Emphasis will be given to novel mechanisms of tumor pathogenesis, immunologic approaches and therapeutics that target the tumor cell metabolism.

In this Issue, original research articles as well as mini and full reviews, including perspectives in the field on the current understanding of the pathogenesis and emerging therapies for brain tumors in children and adults are going to be presented. Manuscripts from both, basic and clinical researchers are welcome.

Dr. Georg Karpel-Massler
Dr. Mike-Andrew Westhoff
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cells is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • brain tumor
  • glioblastoma
  • medulloblastoma
  • tumor immunology
  • tumor cell metabolism

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
CHRDL1 Regulates Stemness in Glioma Stem-like Cells
Cells 2022, 11(23), 3917; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells11233917 (registering DOI) - 03 Dec 2022
Viewed by 92
Abstract
Glioblastoma (GBM) still presents as one of the most aggressive tumours in the brain, which despite enormous research efforts, remains incurable today. As many theories evolve around the persistent recurrence of this malignancy, the assumption of a small population of cells with a [...] Read more.
Glioblastoma (GBM) still presents as one of the most aggressive tumours in the brain, which despite enormous research efforts, remains incurable today. As many theories evolve around the persistent recurrence of this malignancy, the assumption of a small population of cells with a stem-like phenotype remains a key driver of its infiltrative nature. In this article, we research Chordin-like 1 (CHRDL1), a secreted protein, as a potential key regulator of the glioma stem-like cell (GSC) phenotype. It has been shown that CHRDL1 antagonizes the function of bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4), which induces GSC differentiation and, hence, reduces tumorigenicity. We, therefore, employed two previously described GSCs spheroid cultures and depleted them of CHRDL1 using the stable transduction of a CHRDL1-targeting shRNA. We show with in vitro cell-based assays (MTT, limiting dilution, and sphere formation assays), Western blots, irradiation procedures, and quantitative real-time PCR that the depletion of the secreted BMP4 antagonist CHRDL1 prominently decreases functional and molecular stemness traits resulting in enhanced radiation sensitivity. As a result, we postulate CHRDL1 as an enforcer of stemness in GSCs and find additional evidence that high CHRDL1 expression might also serve as a marker protein to determine BMP4 susceptibility. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Therapeutic Strategies for the Treatment of Brain Tumors)

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
Novel Nano-Drug Delivery System for Brain Tumor Treatment
Cells 2022, 11(23), 3761; https://doi.org/10.3390/cells11233761 - 24 Nov 2022
Viewed by 244
Abstract
As the most dangerous tumors, brain tumors are usually treated with surgical removal, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. However, due to the aggressive growth of gliomas and their resistance to conventional chemoradiotherapy, it is difficult to cure brain tumors by conventional means. In addition, [...] Read more.
As the most dangerous tumors, brain tumors are usually treated with surgical removal, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. However, due to the aggressive growth of gliomas and their resistance to conventional chemoradiotherapy, it is difficult to cure brain tumors by conventional means. In addition, the higher dose requirement of chemotherapeutic drugs caused by the blood–brain barrier (BBB) and the untargeted nature of the drug inevitably leads to low efficacy and systemic toxicity of chemotherapy. In recent years, nanodrug carriers have attracted extensive attention because of their superior drug transport capacity and easy-to-control properties. This review systematically summarizes the major strategies of novel nano-drug delivery systems for the treatment of brain tumors in recent years that cross the BBB and enhance brain targeting, and compares the advantages and disadvantages of several strategies. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Therapeutic Strategies for the Treatment of Brain Tumors)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop