Carbon Materials for Water Treatment

A special issue of C (ISSN 2311-5629).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 September 2019) | Viewed by 9107

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Centro de Química Estrutural, Institute of Molecular Sciencies, Departamento de Química e Bioquímica, Faculdade Ciências, Universidade Lisboa, Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: biomass valorization; chars; nanoporous materials; pharmaceutical compounds removal; natural organic matter removal; water treatment; advanced oxidation processes; adsorption; characterization; separation & purification processes; kinetic & equilibrium studies; assays at pilot and full scale
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Centro de Química Estrutural, Faculdade de Ciências, Universidade de Lisboa, 1749-016 Lisboa, Portugal
Interests: synthesis of carbon materials from biomass through conventional and innovative approaches; synthesis and modification of zeolite structures; characterization of materials through different techniques (e.g., physical adsorption of gases, adsorption of bases followed by infrared, X-ray diffraction, electron microscopies); application of carbon materials as adsorbents for the removal of pharmaceuticals from water (fundamental and applied studies); application of carbon materials for energy production and storage; carbon materials as catalysts or catalyst supports; study of the catalytic properties of zeolite materials in refining, petrochemistry, and fine chemistry such as Friedel–Crafts acylation reactions
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The improvement of water treatment technologies is the key to facing current water quality challenges. Among the available technologies, nanoporous carbon adsorption has been considered one of the best available processes for conventional and advanced water treatment, since these materials allow us to control natural occurrence and anthropogenic contaminants. There is a large range of commercial products prepared from both renewable and non-renewable sources, but the development of novel carbon materials continues to be a relevant research topic in materials science, usually aiming to explore sustainable precursors, obtain materials with a tailored pore network and surface chemistry and also controlled morphology. 

The main objective of this Special Issue of CJournal of Carbon Research is to present relevant and recent insights in the field of nanoporous carbons, biochars and derived materials for water treatment, focusing on the removal of priority and emergent pollutants (e.g. pharmaceuticals). We invite authors to submit original communications, articles, or reviews of novel carbon material synthesis and/or regarding their potential to be applied in conventional and advanced water treatment (i.e. adsorption, photocatalysis or hybrid processes).

We look forward to your submission.

Dr. Ana S. Mestre
Prof. Ana P. Carvalho
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Nanoporous carbon synthesis
  • Biochar and hydrochar synthesis
  • Adsorption
  • Photocatalysis
  • Hybrid processes
  • Removal of priority and emergent pollutants
  • Water treatment

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

12 pages, 1867 KiB  
Article
Char from Spent Tire Rubber: A Potential Adsorbent of Remazol Yellow Dye
by Miguel Nogueira, Inês Matos, Maria Bernardo, Filomena Pinto, Nuno Lapa, Elena Surra and Isabel Fonseca
C 2019, 5(4), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/c5040076 - 18 Nov 2019
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3949
Abstract
A char produced from spent tire rubber showed very promising results as an adsorbent of Remazol Yellow (RY) from aqueous solutions. Spent tire rubber was submitted to a pyrolysis process optimized for char production. The obtained char was submitted to chemical, physical, and [...] Read more.
A char produced from spent tire rubber showed very promising results as an adsorbent of Remazol Yellow (RY) from aqueous solutions. Spent tire rubber was submitted to a pyrolysis process optimized for char production. The obtained char was submitted to chemical, physical, and textural characterizations and, subsequently, applied as a low-cost adsorbent for dye (RY) removal in batch adsorption assays. The obtained char was characterized by relatively high ash content (12.9% wt), high fixed-carbon content (69.7% wt), a surface area of 69 m2/g, and total pore volume of 0.14 cm3/g. Remazol Yellow kinetic assays and modelling of the experimental data using the pseudo-first and pseudo-second order kinetic models demonstrated a better adjustment to the pseudo-first order model with a calculated uptake capacity of 14.2 mg RY/g char. From the equilibrium assays, the adsorption isotherm was fitted to both Langmuir and Freundlich models; it was found a better fit for the Langmuir model to the experimental data, indicating a monolayer adsorption process with a monolayer uptake capacity of 11.9 mg RY/g char. Under the experimental conditions of the adsorption assays, the char presented positive charges at its surface, able to attract the deprotonated sulfonate groups (SO3) of RY; therefore, electrostatic attraction was considered the most plausible mechanism for dye removal. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Materials for Water Treatment)
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20 pages, 5668 KiB  
Article
Macadamia Nutshell Biochar for Nitrate Removal: Effect of Biochar Preparation and Process Parameters
by Salam Bakly, Raed A. Al-Juboori and Les Bowtell
C 2019, 5(3), 47; https://doi.org/10.3390/c5030047 - 8 Aug 2019
Cited by 13 | Viewed by 4680
Abstract
Agricultural runoff is a major cause of degradation to freshwater sources. Nitrate is of particular interest, due to the abundant use of nitrogen-based fertilizers in agricultural practices globally. This study investigated the nitrate removal of biochar produced from an agricultural waste product, macadamia [...] Read more.
Agricultural runoff is a major cause of degradation to freshwater sources. Nitrate is of particular interest, due to the abundant use of nitrogen-based fertilizers in agricultural practices globally. This study investigated the nitrate removal of biochar produced from an agricultural waste product, macadamia nutshell (MBC). Kinetic experiments and structural analyses showed that MBC pyrolsed at 900 °C exhibited inferior NO3 removal compared to that pyrolsed at 1000 °C, which was subsequently used in the column experiments. Concentrations of 5, 10 and 15 mg/L, with flowrates of 2, 5 and 10 mL/min, were examined over a 360 min treatment time. Detailed statistical analyses were applied using 23 factorial design. Nitrate removal was significantly affected by flowrate, concentration and their interactions. The highest nitrate removal capacity of 0.11 mg/g MBC was achieved at a NO3 concentration of 15 mg/L and flowrate of 2 mL/min. The more crystalline structure and rough texture of MBC prepared at 1000 °C resulted in higher NO3 removal compared to MBC prepared at 900 °C. The operating parameters with the highest NO3 removal were used to study the removal capacity of the column. Breakthrough and exhaustion times of the column were 25 and 330 min respectively. Approximately 92% of the column bed was saturated after exhaustion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Materials for Water Treatment)
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