Special Issue "Carbon Materials for Physical and Chemical Hydrogen Storage"

A special issue of C (ISSN 2311-5629). This special issue belongs to the section "Carbon Materials and Carbon Allotropes".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Salvador Ordóñez García
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Chemical and Environmental Engineering, University of Oviedo, 33006 Oviedo, Spain
Interests: heterogeneous catalysis; chemical reactors; biomass; hydrodechlorination; oxidation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The relevance of hydrogen as an energy vector has grown in recent years. The increase in the efficiency of electrolysis cells allows converting renewable but fluctuating energy sources (such as wind or sun) into this carbon-neutral gas. In the same way, processes based on biomass gasification followed by water gas shift reaction and hydrogen recovery have been largely improved. However, the storage and transportation of this hydrogen is still a major challenge for the development of the hydrogen economy.

Carbon materials are going to play a key role in hydrogen storage technologies. In the case of physical storage, materials from slightly modified activated carbon to metal organic frameworks, also considering graphene derivatives, carbon nanofibers, nanotubes, etc., have been proposed as hydrogen adsorbents both for separation and storage purposes.

Most chemical storage strategies are mainly based on catalytic hydrogenation–dehydrogenation cycles. Carbon materials are promising supports for the catalysts used in these steps because of their inert character and their ability to tune the catalytic properties of the involved active phases.

Considering these facts, the aim of this Special Issue is to gather submissions (either experimental, computational, or from the point of view of process simulation) about the potential of carbon-based materials for hydrogen storage.

Prof. Dr. Salvador Ordóñez García
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. C is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • hydrogen adsorption
  • catalytic hydrogenation
  • catalytic dehydrogenation
  • adsorption technologies
  • green hydrogen
  • blue hydrogen
  • liquid organic hydrogen carriers (LOHCs)

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Effects of Reducing Agent on the Activity of PtRu/Carbon Black Anode Catalyst of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell
C 2021, 7(4), 72; https://doi.org/10.3390/c7040072 - 19 Oct 2021
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Abstract
A series of PtRu/carbon black catalysts were prepared by means of deposition-precipitation and reduced by various reducing agents. NaBH4, HCHO and NaH2PO2, respectively, were used as the reduction agents. Some of the samples were reduced by various [...] Read more.
A series of PtRu/carbon black catalysts were prepared by means of deposition-precipitation and reduced by various reducing agents. NaBH4, HCHO and NaH2PO2, respectively, were used as the reduction agents. Some of the samples were reduced by various amounts of NaH2PO2 to investigate the effects of P/Pt ratios on the characteristics and activity of the catalyst. These catalysts were characterized by X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The components of these catalysts were detected by X-ray fluorescence, X-ray photoelectron microscopy, and extended X-ray absorption of fine structures (EXAFS). The methanol oxidation ability of the catalysts was tested by cyclic voltammetry measurement. The results show that NaH2PO2 could effectively reduce the particle size of PtRu metal. It can suppress the growth of metal particles. In addition, the P/Pt ratio is crucial. The catalyst reduced by NaH2PO2 with a P/Pt ratio of 1.2 had the highest activity among all catalysts. It had the higher Pt and Ru metal contents and smaller metal particle size than the other catalysts. Its activity was 253.12 A/g, which is higher that than the commercial catalyst (Johnson Matthey H10100, 251.32 A/g). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Materials for Physical and Chemical Hydrogen Storage)
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Article
CH Activation by a Heavy Metal Cation: Production of H2 from the Reaction of Acetylene with C4H4-Os(+) in Gas phase
C 2021, 7(4), 68; https://doi.org/10.3390/c7040068 - 30 Sep 2021
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Abstract
While first-row transition metal cations, notably Fe(+), catalyze the gas-phase conversion of acetylene to benzene, a distinct path is chosen in systems with Os, Ir, and Rh cations. Rather than losing the metal cation M(+) from the benzene–M(+) complex, as is observed for [...] Read more.
While first-row transition metal cations, notably Fe(+), catalyze the gas-phase conversion of acetylene to benzene, a distinct path is chosen in systems with Os, Ir, and Rh cations. Rather than losing the metal cation M(+) from the benzene–M(+) complex, as is observed for the Fe(+) system, the heavy metal ions activate CH bonds. The landmark system C4H4-Os(+) reacts with acetylene to produce C6H4-Os(+) and dihydrogen. Following our work on isomers of the form C2nH2n-Fe(+), we show by DFT modeling that the CH bonds of the metalla-7-cycle structure, C6H6-Os(+), are activated and define the gas-phase reaction path by which H2 is produced. The landmark structures on the network of reaction paths can be used as a basis for the discussion of reactions in which a single Os atom on an inert surface can assist reactions of hydrocarbons. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Materials for Physical and Chemical Hydrogen Storage)
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Article
Biomass-Derived Carbons as Versatile Materials for Energy-Related Applications: Capacitive Properties vs. Oxygen Reduction Reaction Catalysis
C 2021, 7(3), 55; https://doi.org/10.3390/c7030055 - 24 Jul 2021
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Abstract
Biomass-derived carbons are very attractive materials due to the possibility of tuning their properties for different energy-related applications. Various pore sizes, conductivities and the inherent presence of heteroatoms make them attractive for different electrochemical reactions, including the implementation of electrochemical capacitors or fuel [...] Read more.
Biomass-derived carbons are very attractive materials due to the possibility of tuning their properties for different energy-related applications. Various pore sizes, conductivities and the inherent presence of heteroatoms make them attractive for different electrochemical reactions, including the implementation of electrochemical capacitors or fuel cell electrodes. This contribution demonstrates how different biomass-derived carbons prepared from the same precursor of viscose fibers can reach appreciable capacitances (up to 200 F g−1) or a high selectivity for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). We find that a highly specific surface area and a large mesopore volume dominate the capacitive response in both aqueous and non-aqueous electrolytic solutions. While the oxygen reduction reaction activity is not dominated by the same factors at low ORR overpotentials, these take the dominant role over surface chemistry at high ORR overpotentials. Due to the high selectivity of the O2 reduction to peroxide and the appreciable specific capacitances, it is suggested that activated carbon fibers derived from viscose fibers are an attractive and versatile material for electrochemical energy conversion applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Materials for Physical and Chemical Hydrogen Storage)
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Review

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Review
Review of Cryogenic Carbon Capture Innovations and Their Potential Applications
C 2021, 7(3), 58; https://doi.org/10.3390/c7030058 - 29 Jul 2021
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Abstract
Our ever-increasing interest in economic growth is leading the way to the decline of natural resources, the detriment of air quality, and is fostering climate change. One potential solution to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from industrial emitters is the exploitation of carbon capture [...] Read more.
Our ever-increasing interest in economic growth is leading the way to the decline of natural resources, the detriment of air quality, and is fostering climate change. One potential solution to reduce carbon dioxide emissions from industrial emitters is the exploitation of carbon capture and storage (CCS). Among the various CO2 separation technologies, cryogenic carbon capture (CCC) could emerge by offering high CO2 recovery rates and purity levels. This review covers the different CCC methods that are being developed, their benefits, and the current challenges deterring their commercialisation. It also offers an appraisal for selected feasible small- and large-scale CCC applications, including blue hydrogen production and direct air capture. This work considers their technological readiness for CCC deployment and acknowledges competing technologies and ends by providing some insights into future directions related to the R&D for CCC systems. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Carbon Materials for Physical and Chemical Hydrogen Storage)
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