Architectural Design Supported by Information Technology: 2nd Edition

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Architectural Design, Urban Science, and Real Estate".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2024 | Viewed by 2398

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Architecture, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany
Interests: computational design; BIM; design decision support; AI; public participation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Architecture, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Valparaíso, Chile
Interests: robotic timber joinery; traditional timber framing; robotic fabrication; affordable housing design; constraint-based design
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Architecture, Technical University of Munich, Munich, Germany
Interests: mixed reality/AI/early design stages/design decision support/computational design
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

As fundamental planning decisions are made during early stages in design processes, early stages of architectural design have a significant impact on the subsequent performance of cities, districts and buildings in these settlements.

Increasing digitization, the technological innovations that accompany digitization and resultant new methods have contributed to wide-ranging transformations in architectural design processes in recent decades.

Today, information technology offers a vast number of different design methods and tools, for example, simulations, artificial intelligence, additive manufacturing and robotic fabrication as well as BIM towards digital twins in built environments as a digital backbone.

In addition, climate change and its consequences have significantly changed the way we think about living together and how we deal with (spatial) resources.

The key to current research and research in the coming years will be to exploit the potential of currently available and forward-looking information technologies and their integration into design processes to offer an "expanded possibility space" and to support architects in decision-making processes.

The aim of this Special Issue is to allow scientists who are investigating digital methods to support decision-making processes in early stages of design processes to publish their works and to discuss potential application fields with a broad scientific community.

You can view the Original Special Issue here: https://www.mdpi.com/journal/buildings/special_issues/Architectural_Information.

Prof. Dr. Frank Petzold
Prof. Luis Felipe González Böhme
Dr. Gerhard Schubert
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • early architectural design stages
  • computational design
  • design decision support
  • simulation, prediction, and evaluation in design
  • BIM
  • performance-based spatial design
  • machine learning
  • Construction 4.0/robotic fabrication/human–robot collaboration

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

25 pages, 62083 KiB  
Article
Optimizing Built Environment in Urban Negative Spaces Using Parametric Methods—Research on a High-Density City in China
by Wenqi Bai, Yudi Wu, Yiwei He, Li Wang, Zining Qiu and Yuqi Ye
Buildings 2024, 14(4), 1081; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14041081 - 12 Apr 2024
Viewed by 626
Abstract
In the early stage of architectural design, addressing the challenges posed by negative spaces in high-density urban environments is crucial for enhancing spatial efficiency and building sustainability. Multiple studies employed digital methods and tools to address these issues, such as parametric design, simulation, [...] Read more.
In the early stage of architectural design, addressing the challenges posed by negative spaces in high-density urban environments is crucial for enhancing spatial efficiency and building sustainability. Multiple studies employed digital methods and tools to address these issues, such as parametric design, simulation, and genetic algorithms, to investigate architectural generation approaches for urban negative spaces. This article proposes an integrated design process that involves finding the location and form of negative spaces, generating solutions using slime mold and wasp algorithms, and optimizing and analyzing solutions using the Wallacei plugin in Grasshopper. This comprehensive approach underscores the potential of parametric design to yield a multitude of solutions while also acknowledging the convergence challenges encountered during simulations, particularly in optimizing for optimal sunlight exposure during the winter solstice and minimal solar radiation in the summer. Analyzing the optimization goals and parameter values of the 15th Pareto optimal solution in the 100th generation reveals: (1) a higher number of units leads to positive correlation growth in both objectives; (2) within a certain number of units, parametrically generated solutions facilitate the convergence of optimization goals, yielding optimal outcomes. Therefore, factors such as the range of unit quantities and proportions need consideration during early-stage parametric design and simulation. This study explores a design methodology for negative spaces in high-density urban cities, validating the feasibility of various mainstream generation methods and offering insights for future research. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Architectural Design Supported by Information Technology: 2nd Edition)
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23 pages, 6242 KiB  
Article
Design Decision Support for Healthcare Architecture: A VR-Integrated Approach for Measuring User Perception
by Tianyi Yang, Marcus White, Ruby Lipson-Smith, Michelle M. Shannon and Mehrnoush Latifi
Buildings 2024, 14(3), 797; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14030797 - 15 Mar 2024
Viewed by 1084
Abstract
Changing the physical environment of healthcare facilities can positively impact patient outcomes. Virtual reality (VR) offers the potential to understand how healthcare environment design impacts users’ perception, particularly among those with brain injuries like stroke, an area with limited research. In this study, [...] Read more.
Changing the physical environment of healthcare facilities can positively impact patient outcomes. Virtual reality (VR) offers the potential to understand how healthcare environment design impacts users’ perception, particularly among those with brain injuries like stroke, an area with limited research. In this study, our objective was to forge a new pathway in healthcare environment research by developing a comprehensive, six-module ‘user-centered’ design decision support approach, utilizing VR technology. This innovative method integrated patient engagement, architectural design principles, BIM prototyping, and a sophisticated VR user interface to produce realistic and immersive healthcare scenarios. Forty-four stroke survivors participated, experiencing 32 VR scenarios of in-patient bedrooms, followed by interactive in-VR questions and semi-structured interviews. The results of the approach proved to be comparatively efficient and feasible, provided a high level of immersion and presence for the participants, and effectively elicited extremely rich quantifiable response data, which revealed distinct environmental preferences. Our novel approach to understanding end-user responses to stroke rehabilitation architecture demonstrates potential to inform user-centered evidence-based design decisions in healthcare, to improve user experiences and health outcomes in other healthcare populations and environments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Architectural Design Supported by Information Technology: 2nd Edition)
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