Special Issue "IT in Design, Construction, and Management"

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2019)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. David Arditi

Construction Engineering and Management Program, Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3201 South Dearborn Street, Chicago, IL 60616, USA
Website | E-Mail
Phone: +1 312 567 5751
Fax: +1 312 567 3519
Interests: construction management; organizational theory; conflict resolution; optimal bidding strategies; project delivery systems; sustainability, linear scheduling methods; stochastic simulation; information technologies
Guest Editor
Dr. Ivan Mutis

Construction Engineering and Management Program, Department of Civil, Architectural, and Environmental Engineering, Illinois Institute of Technology, 3201 South Dearborn Street, Chicago, IL 60616, USA
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Information technologies for collaboration and communbication in construction; Building Information Modeling (BIM); virtual design construction, interoperability and semantics (ontologies, product, and process modeling)

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The 35th CIB W78 Conference on IT in Design, Construction, and Management will be held on October 1–3, 2018, at Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago. W78 is CIB’s working commission on IT for construction. The scope of W78’s work is broad in terms of the design, construction and occupancy of constructed facilities, but primarily relates to the integration and communication of data, information and knowledge in the facility’s life cycle. Information and communication technologies are relevant to all aspects of the workplace and are seen as a major enabler of productivity improvement. The commission focuses on sophisticated and integrated IT throughout the life-cycle of the design, construction and occupancy of buildings and related facilities.

Extended versions of selected papers presented at the 35h CIB W78 Conference will be published in a Special Issue of Buildings

Prof. Dr. David Arditi
Dr. Ivan Mutis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 550 CHF (Swiss Francs). Every submitted paper in this special issue if accepted will have a 20% discount, which means an APC of 440 CHF will apply. Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Information technologies
  • Building design
  • Building construction
  • Building operation

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle A Generalized Adaptive Framework (GAF) for Automating Code Compliance Checking
Received: 30 March 2019 / Revised: 10 April 2019 / Accepted: 13 April 2019 / Published: 16 April 2019
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Abstract
Building design review is the procedure of checking a design against codes and standard provisions to satisfy the accuracy of the design and identify non-compliances before construction begins. The current approaches for conducting the design review process in an automatic or semi-automatic manner [...] Read more.
Building design review is the procedure of checking a design against codes and standard provisions to satisfy the accuracy of the design and identify non-compliances before construction begins. The current approaches for conducting the design review process in an automatic or semi-automatic manner are either based on proprietary, domain-specific or hard-coded rule-based mechanisms. These methods may be effective in their specific applications, but they have the downsides of being costly to maintain, inflexible to modify, and lack a generalized framework of rules and regulations modeling that can adapt to various engineering design realms, and thus don’t support a neutral data standard. They are often referred to as ‘Black Box’ or ‘Gray Box’ approaches. This research offers a new comprehensive framework that reduces the limitations of the cited methods. Building regulations, for instance, are legal documents transcribed and approved by professionals to be interpreted and applied by people. They are hardly as precise as formal logic. Engineers, architects, and contractors can read those technical documents and transform them into scientific notations and software applications. They can extract any data they need, reason about it, and apply it at various phases of the project. How these extraction and use are carried out is a critical component of automating the design review process. The chief goal is to address this issue by developing a Generalized Adaptive Framework (GAF) for a neutral data standard (Industry Foundation Classes (IFC)) that enables automating the code compliance checking processes to achieve design efficiency and cost-effectiveness. The objectives of this study comprise i) to develop a theoretical background to an adaptive framework that supports a neutral data standard for transforming the written code regulations and rules into a computable model, and ii) to define the various modules required for computerizing of the code compliance verification process. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue IT in Design, Construction, and Management)
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Open AccessArticle Achieving a Trade-Off Construction Solution Using BIM, an Optimization Algorithm, and a Multi-Criteria Decision-Making Method
Received: 5 March 2019 / Revised: 21 March 2019 / Accepted: 9 April 2019 / Published: 10 April 2019
PDF Full-text (1835 KB)
Abstract
The Energy Performance of Building Directive obligated all European countries to reduce the energy requirements of buildings while simultaneously improving indoor environment quality. Any such improvements not only enhance the health of the occupants and their productivity, but also provide further economic benefits [...] Read more.
The Energy Performance of Building Directive obligated all European countries to reduce the energy requirements of buildings while simultaneously improving indoor environment quality. Any such improvements not only enhance the health of the occupants and their productivity, but also provide further economic benefits at the national level. Accomplishing this task requires a method that allows building professionals to resolve conflicts between visual and thermal comfort, energy demands, and life-cycle costs. To overcome these conflicts, this study exploits the incorporation of building information modelling (BIM), the design of experiments as an optimization algorithm, and the analytical hierarchy process (AHP) into a multi-criteria decision-making method. Any such incorporation can (i) create constructive communication between building professionals, such as architects, engineers, and energy experts; (ii) allow the analysis of the performance of multiple construction solutions with respect to visual and thermal comfort, energy demand, and life-cycle costs; and (iii) help to select a trade-off solution, thereby making a suitable decision. Three types of energy-efficient windows, and five types of ground floors, roofs, and external wall constructions were considered as optimization variables. The incorporation of several methods allowed the analysis of the performance of 375 construction solutions based on a combination of optimization variables, and helped to select a trade-off solution. The results showed the strength of incorporation for analyzing big-data through the intelligent use of BIM and a simulation in the field of the built environment, energy, and costs. However, when applying AHP, the results are strongly contingent on pairwise comparisons. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue IT in Design, Construction, and Management)
Open AccessArticle Integrated Parametric Shaping of Curvilinear Steel Bar Structures of Canopy Roofs
Received: 26 February 2019 / Revised: 16 March 2019 / Accepted: 18 March 2019 / Published: 21 March 2019
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Abstract
Shaping building objects is conditioned by many interrelated factors, both architectural and structural. Modern tools for shaping structures working in the environment of Rhinoceros 3D such as Grasshopper and Karamba 3D enable algorithmic-aided shaping structures, while allowing the free flow of information between [...] Read more.
Shaping building objects is conditioned by many interrelated factors, both architectural and structural. Modern tools for shaping structures working in the environment of Rhinoceros 3D such as Grasshopper and Karamba 3D enable algorithmic-aided shaping structures, while allowing the free flow of information between the geometric model and structural model. The aim of the research is to use these tools to test the curvilinear steel bar roofs’ structures shaped based on Catalan surfaces as well as to select the most efficient structure. Three types of roof structures were analyzed: cylindroid shape, conoid shape, and hyperbolic paraboloid shape. In order to find the most preferred structural form, evolutionary structural optimization was carried out, which allowed, among others, to determine optimal discretization of the base surface, as well as optimal positions of supporting columns. As the optimization criterion, the minimum mass of the structure was assumed. The most effective structure turned out to be a structure based on hyperbolic paraboloid supported by multi-branch columns. The use of a roof with the above structure is beneficial not only because of the low weight of the structure compared to the analyzed structures, but also due to the possibility of using flat panels on the roof. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue IT in Design, Construction, and Management)
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Open AccessArticle Graph-Based Construction of 3D Korean Giwa House Models
Received: 19 February 2019 / Revised: 12 March 2019 / Accepted: 14 March 2019 / Published: 18 March 2019
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Abstract
This paper proposes a graph-based algorithm for constructing 3D Korean traditional houses automatically using a computer graphics technique. In particular, we target designing the most popular traditional house type, a giwa house, whose roof is covered with a set of Korean traditional roof [...] Read more.
This paper proposes a graph-based algorithm for constructing 3D Korean traditional houses automatically using a computer graphics technique. In particular, we target designing the most popular traditional house type, a giwa house, whose roof is covered with a set of Korean traditional roof tiles called giwa. In our approach, we divided the whole design processes into two different parts. At a high level, we propose a special data structure called ‘modeling graphs’. A modeling graph consists of a set of nodes and edges. A node represents a particular component of the house and an edge represents the connection between two components with all associated parameters, including an offset vector between components. Users can easily add/ delete nodes and make them connect by an edge through a few mouse clicks. Once a modeling graph is built, then it is interpreted and rendered on a component-by-component basis by traversing nodes in a procedural way. At a low level, we came up with all the required parameters for constructing the components. Among all the components, the most beautiful but complicated part is the gently curved roof structures. In order to represent the sophisticated roof style, we introduce a spline curve-based modeling technique that is able to create curvy silhouettes of three different roof styles. In this process, rather than just applying a simple texture image onto the roof, which is widely used in commercial software, we actually laid out 3D giwa tiles on the roof seamlessly, which generated more realistic looks. Through many experiments, we verified that the proposed algorithm can model and render the giwa house at a real time rate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue IT in Design, Construction, and Management)
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