New Concrete Materials: Performance Analysis and Research

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309). This special issue belongs to the section "Building Materials, and Repair & Renovation".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 April 2024 | Viewed by 2616

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Zhe Xiong
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Civil and Transportation Engineering, Guangdong University of Technology, Guangzhou 510006, China
Interests: recycled aggregate concrete; fiber-reinforced concrete; durability; microstructure; performance in aggressive environments

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

With the development of civil engineering, the requirements for concrete performance are also increasing. In order to meet the usage requirements, researchers have continuously developed new concrete materials with higher strength and better durability. The rational use of new concrete materials can greatly improve the quality of civil engineering projects. New concrete materials play a very important role in reducing costs, increasing service life, and promoting environmental protection. Through microscopic analysis (e.g., scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and so on), it is possible to gain a deeper understanding of the mechanical properties and failure mechanisms of new concrete materials.

This Special Issue aims to encourage scientists and researchers to publish their experimental and theoretical findings or solutions on new concrete materials. Research areas may include (but not limited to) the following:

  • Recycled concrete;
  • Modified concrete;
  • Ultra-high performance concrete;
  • Mechanical properties;
  • Durability;
  • Low carbon;
  • Microstructure. 

We look forward to receiving your contributions.

Dr. Zhe Xiong
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • recycled concrete
  • modified concrete
  • ultra-high performance concrete
  • mechanical properties
  • durability
  • low carbon
  • microstructure

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

21 pages, 11990 KiB  
Article
Experimental Study on the Effects of Straight and Ring-Type Steel Fibres on the Bond Behaviour of Steel Bars in Rubber-Recycled Aggregate Concrete
Buildings 2024, 14(2), 504; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14020504 - 12 Feb 2024
Viewed by 388
Abstract
The application range of rubber-recycled aggregate concrete (RRAC), a new type of green building material, is currently limited due to performance defects, including low hardness, high water absorption, and poor adhesion. To expand its application in reinforced concrete structures, it is crucial to [...] Read more.
The application range of rubber-recycled aggregate concrete (RRAC), a new type of green building material, is currently limited due to performance defects, including low hardness, high water absorption, and poor adhesion. To expand its application in reinforced concrete structures, it is crucial to enhance the bonding performance between RRAC and steel bars. In this study, the effects of adding straight steel fibres (SSFs) and ring-type steel fibres (RSFs) to RRAC were investigated, in order to enhance the bonding performance. To investigate the impact of steel fibres (SFs) on the bonding properties of RRAC and steel bars, a total of 51 specimens were subjected to pull-out tests to systematically examine the impact of SSF and RSF dosages on the bonding performance. The results demonstrated that incorporating the optimal amount of SSFs and RSFs can significantly improve the bond strength and bond stiffness. Moreover, the combined use of SSFs and RSFs yielded even better enhancement effects. The RRAC exhibited remarkable performance, when the total content of SFs was 1.2% and the proportion of RSFs 75%. In this case, the bond strength and bond stiffness were enhanced by 3.7% and 53.88%, respectively. Finally, a bond–slip constitutive model for RRAC and steel bar was established. The combined use of SSFs and RSFs minimizes the limitations of poor mechanical properties in traditional RRAC and holds significant value for the widespread adoption and application of RRAC. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Concrete Materials: Performance Analysis and Research)
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21 pages, 21456 KiB  
Article
Study on the Dynamic Performance and Damage Evaluation of Rubber-Modified Non-Autoclaved Concrete Pipe Piles under Axial Drop Hammer Impact
Buildings 2024, 14(2), 489; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14020489 - 09 Feb 2024
Viewed by 277
Abstract
In order to improve the weak impact resistance of non-autoclaved concrete pipe piles, this study replaced sand in the concrete with rubber particles of different volume contents to obtain rubber-modified non-autoclaved concrete pipe piles (with volume contents of 0%, 5%, 10%, and 15%). [...] Read more.
In order to improve the weak impact resistance of non-autoclaved concrete pipe piles, this study replaced sand in the concrete with rubber particles of different volume contents to obtain rubber-modified non-autoclaved concrete pipe piles (with volume contents of 0%, 5%, 10%, and 15%). The dynamic impact response characteristics of rubber-modified non-autoclaved concrete pipe piles were obtained through large-scale axial hammer impact experiments. The results indicate the following. (1) Non-autoclaved concrete pipe piles without rubber additives were prone to expansion deformation instability under impact. When the rubber content was 10%, the expansion deformation of the piles was the weakest, and the state was the most stable. (2) When the impact energy exceeded 48 kJ, the deformation energies of piles with 5% and 10% rubber contents significantly increased. (3) The damage levels of the piles after hammer impact were classified into four grades: no damage, mild damage, moderate damage, and severe damage. When the impact energy was greater than or equal to 48 kJ, rubber-modified non-autoclaved concrete pipe piles exhibited damage. The zone with no damage for piles with 10% rubber content was the smallest, making it less prone to damage under impact loads. The rubber-modified non-autoclaved concrete pipe piles with 10% rubber content not only had excellent impact resistance but also utilized the advantages of being environmentally friendly and energy-saving. They filled a certain knowledge gap in green building materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Concrete Materials: Performance Analysis and Research)
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22 pages, 8622 KiB  
Article
Performance Evaluation of Thermal Insulation Rubberized Mortar Modified by Fly Ash and Glass Fiber
Buildings 2024, 14(1), 221; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14010221 - 14 Jan 2024
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 844
Abstract
The utilization of waste rubber as a viable option for manufacturing building materials holds great significance for the sustainable development of the construction industry. This study explores the addition of two additives, fly ash (FA) and glass fiber (GF), to rubberized mortar in [...] Read more.
The utilization of waste rubber as a viable option for manufacturing building materials holds great significance for the sustainable development of the construction industry. This study explores the addition of two additives, fly ash (FA) and glass fiber (GF), to rubberized mortar in order to improve its performance. The impact of different waste rubber powder (RP) replacement rates and modified additive dosages on the performance of rubberized mortar, including fluidity, mechanical properties, drying shrinkage, impact resistance, and thermal insulation properties, was investigated. Furthermore, the analytic hierarchy process (AHP) was adopted to study the priorities of the rubberized mortar modified by FA and GF. The results indicate that the addition of RP leads to a decrease in mortar fluidity, mechanical properties, and drying shrinkage. However, it can enhance its impact resistance and thermal insulation properties. The additives, FA and GF, have a significant influence on the properties of rubberized mortar. By means of AHP method analysis, this study concludes that the optimal comprehensive properties of FA- and GF-modified rubberized mortar can be achieved by replacing 10% of sand with RP and using 10% FA and 0.4% GF. This study presents a configuration method for modified thermal insulation rubberized mortar, and it may lead to FA and GF being considered potential candidates for developing environmentally friendly building materials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Concrete Materials: Performance Analysis and Research)
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21 pages, 6180 KiB  
Article
Effect of Expansion Agent and Glass Fiber on the Dynamic Splitting Tensile Properties of Seawater–Sea-Sand Concrete
Buildings 2024, 14(1), 217; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14010217 - 13 Jan 2024
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 459
Abstract
In marine structural engineering, the impact resistance of concrete holds high significance. The determination of whether the combined use of expansion agent (EA) and glass fiber (GF) has a synergistic effect on the impact resistance of seawater–sea-sand concrete (SSC) and plays a role [...] Read more.
In marine structural engineering, the impact resistance of concrete holds high significance. The determination of whether the combined use of expansion agent (EA) and glass fiber (GF) has a synergistic effect on the impact resistance of seawater–sea-sand concrete (SSC) and plays a role in its performance and application. In this study, the dynamic Brazilian disc test at various strain rates was carried out with an SHPB device to investigate the effect of mixing 0% and 6% EA with 0% and 1% GF on the dynamic splitting tensile properties of SSC. The results show that strain rate effect on EA and GF-reinforced SSC during dynamic splitting tensile tests at higher strain rates, indicating strong strain rate sensitivity. The synergistic reinforcement of EA and GF consumed more energy under impact loading, thus maintaining the morphological integrity of concrete. However, the dynamic splitting tensile strength obtained in the Brazilian disc test had a significant overload effect which cannot be ignored. EA doped at 6% and GF doped at 1% showed a synergistic enhancement of SSC’s dynamic splitting tensile properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Concrete Materials: Performance Analysis and Research)
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16 pages, 14453 KiB  
Article
Bond Performance between Fiber-Wrapped Ribbed Basalt Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Bars and Seawater Sea-Sand Concrete
Buildings 2024, 14(1), 38; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings14010038 - 22 Dec 2023
Viewed by 441
Abstract
The high corrosion resistance of fiber-reinforced polymers (FRPs) and related concrete structures means that they are suitable for application in the marine environment. Therefore, the replacement of steel bars with fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) bars enhances corrosion resistance in seawater sea-sand concrete (SSC) structures. [...] Read more.
The high corrosion resistance of fiber-reinforced polymers (FRPs) and related concrete structures means that they are suitable for application in the marine environment. Therefore, the replacement of steel bars with fiber-reinforced polymer (FRP) bars enhances corrosion resistance in seawater sea-sand concrete (SSC) structures. Geometric parameters significantly influence the performance of the bond between ribbed FRP bars and SSC, thereby affecting the mechanical properties of the concrete structures. In this study, the performance of the bond between ribbed (i.e., with fiber wrapping) basalt-fiber-reinforced polymer (BFRP) bars and SSC was investigated through pull-out tests that considered rib geometry and SSC strength. The results demonstrated that an increase in rib and dent widths reduced the bond stiffness, while an increase in rib height and SSC strength gradually increased the bond stiffness and strength. Additionally, the bond stiffness and bond strength were relatively low because the surface fiber bundles buffered the mechanical interlocking force between the BFRP ribs and the concrete, resulting in plastic bond failure during the loading process. Furthermore, the adhesion of the fiber bundles to the surface of the BFRP bars also influenced bond performance, with higher adhesion leading to greater bond stiffness and strength. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue New Concrete Materials: Performance Analysis and Research)
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