Neurorehabilitation of Sensory Disorders

A special issue of Brain Sciences (ISSN 2076-3425). This special issue belongs to the section "Systems Neuroscience".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 July 2021) | Viewed by 16661

Special Issue Editors


E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Optometry and Vision Science, University of Waterloo, Waterloo N2L 3G1, ON, Canada
Interests: visual development; neuroplasticity; non-invasive brain stimulation; neuroimaging; visual perception; perceptual learning; amblyopia

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Audiology Section, University of Auckland, 1010 Auckland, New Zealand
Interests: tinnitus; hearing; perceptual learning; sensory integration; hearing aids; mhealth; behavioral intervention technology

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Optometry, Faculty of Health and Social Sciences, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, China
Interests: perceptual learning; vision rehabilitation; geriatric vision; vision and balance

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, significant progress has been made in the development of techniques for enhancing neuroplasticity, and these techniques have been applied to the neurorehabilitation for sensory disorders. Neuroplasticity is pronounced during infancy and childhood when sensory input guides and sculpts brain development. As the brain matures, this “sensitive period” of brain development closes, and neuroplasticity wanes. The age-related reduction in neuroplasticity has serious implications for neurorehabilitation from sensory disorders. This is because neurorehabilitation typically requires significant neuroplasticity to support changes in the processing of sensory information within the brain. This Special Issue will focus on innovative and emerging methods to probe the neural basis of sensory disorders and related neurorehabilitation.

The aim of this Special Issue is to identify common neurorehabilitation research themes across multiple sensory disorders and recognize the most effective new techniques and opportunities for novel collaborations within the field.

The scope of this Special Issue encompasses basic and applied research into neuroplasticity and neurorehabilitation related to disorders that affect vision, audition, olfaction, gustation, touch, proprioception, or any combination of these. Examples include recovery of vision in amblyopia and reduction of symptoms in tinnitus.

Research involving cutting-edge neuroplasticity induction techniques, including but not limited to non-invasive brain stimulation, pharmaceuticals, perceptual learning, attention training, and exercise, is welcomed. Brain imaging and neurophysiological studies that reveal neural mechanisms relevant to neurorehabilitation are also well suited to this Special Issue.

Original research papers, review papers, and high-impact case series are of interest.

Prof. Dr. Ben Thompson
Dr. Grant Searchfield
Dr. Allen Cheong
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Brain Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • neuroplasticity
  • sensory processing
  • rehabilitation
  • perception
  • vision
  • audition
  • multisensory

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

28 pages, 19143 KiB  
Article
Behavioral Outcomes and Neural Network Modeling of a Novel, Putative, Recategorization Sound Therapy
by Mithila Durai, Zohreh Doborjeh, Philip J. Sanders, Dunja Vajsakovic, Anne Wendt and Grant D. Searchfield
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(5), 554; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11050554 - 27 Apr 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3001
Abstract
The mechanisms underlying sound’s effect on tinnitus perception are unclear. Tinnitus activity appears to conflict with perceptual expectations of “real” sound, resulting in it being a salient signal. Attention diverted towards tinnitus during the later stages of object processing potentially disrupts high-order auditory [...] Read more.
The mechanisms underlying sound’s effect on tinnitus perception are unclear. Tinnitus activity appears to conflict with perceptual expectations of “real” sound, resulting in it being a salient signal. Attention diverted towards tinnitus during the later stages of object processing potentially disrupts high-order auditory streaming, and its uncertain nature results in negative psychological responses. This study investigated the benefits and neurophysiological basis of passive perceptual training and informational counseling to recategorize phantom perception as a more real auditory object. Specifically, it examined underlying psychoacoustic correlates of tinnitus and the neural activities associated with tinnitus auditory streaming and how malleable these are to change with targeted intervention. Eighteen participants (8 females, 10 males, mean age = 61.6 years) completed the study. The study consisted of 2 parts: (1) An acute exposure over 30 min to a sound that matched the person’s tinnitus (Tinnitus Avatar) that was cross-faded to a selected nature sound (Cicadas, Fan, Water Sound/Rain, Birds, Water and Bird). (2) A chronic exposure for 3 months to the same “morphed” sound. A brain-inspired spiking neural network (SNN) architecture was used to model and compare differences between electroencephalography (EEG) patterns recorded prior to morphing sound presentation, during, after (3-month), and post-follow-up. Results showed that the tinnitus avatar generated was a good match to an individual’s tinnitus as rated on likeness scales and was not rated as unpleasant. The five environmental sounds selected for this study were also rated as being appropriate matches to individuals’ tinnitus and largely pleasant to listen to. There was a significant reduction in the Tinnitus Functional Index score and subscales of intrusiveness of the tinnitus signal and ability to concentrate with the tinnitus trial end compared to baseline. There was a significant decrease in how strong the tinnitus signal was rated as well as ratings of how easy it was to ignore the tinnitus signal on severity rating scales. Qualitative analysis found that the environmental sound interacted with the tinnitus in a positive way, but participants did not experience change in severity, however, characteristics of tinnitus, including pitch and uniformity of sound, were reported to change. The results indicate the feasibility of the computational SNN method and preliminary evidence that the sound exposure may change activation of neural tinnitus networks and greater bilateral hemispheric involvement as the sound morphs over time into natural environmental sound; particularly relating to attention and discriminatory judgments (dorsal attention network, precentral gyrus, ventral anterior network). This is the first study that attempts to recategorize tinnitus using passive auditory training to a sound that morphs from resembling the person’s tinnitus to a natural sound. These findings will be used to design future-controlled trials to elucidate whether the approach used differs in effect and mechanism from conventional Broadband Noise (BBN) sound therapy. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neurorehabilitation of Sensory Disorders)
Show Figures

Figure 1

20 pages, 1275 KiB  
Article
Improving Emotion Perception in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder with Computer-Based Training and Hearing Amplification
by Joan H. Leung, Suzanne C. Purdy and Paul M. Corballis
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(4), 469; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11040469 - 08 Apr 2021
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 3002
Abstract
Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) experience challenges with social communication, often involving emotional elements of language. This may stem from underlying auditory processing difficulties, especially when incoming speech is nuanced or complex. This study explored the effects of auditory training on social [...] Read more.
Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) experience challenges with social communication, often involving emotional elements of language. This may stem from underlying auditory processing difficulties, especially when incoming speech is nuanced or complex. This study explored the effects of auditory training on social perception abilities of children with ASD. The training combined use of a remote-microphone hearing system and computerized emotion perception training. At baseline, children with ASD had poorer social communication scores and delayed mismatch negativity (MMN) compared to typically developing children. Behavioral results, measured pre- and post-intervention, revealed increased social perception scores in children with ASD to the extent that they outperformed their typically developing peers post-intervention. Electrophysiology results revealed changes in neural responses to emotional speech stimuli. Post-intervention, mismatch responses of children with ASD more closely resembled their neurotypical peers, with shorter MMN latencies, a significantly heightened P2 wave, and greater differentiation of emotional stimuli, consistent with their improved behavioral results. This study sets the foundation for further investigation into connections between auditory processing difficulties and social perception and communication for individuals with ASD, and provides a promising indication that combining amplified hearing and computer-based targeted social perception training using emotional speech stimuli may have neuro-rehabilitative benefits. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neurorehabilitation of Sensory Disorders)
Show Figures

Figure 1

12 pages, 1299 KiB  
Article
Virtual Environment Rehabilitation for Patients with Motor Neglect Trial (VERMONT): A Single-Center Randomized Controlled Feasibility Trial
by Elsje de Villiers, Thomas Stone, Nai-Wei Wang, Viswadeep Sarangi, Adar Pelah and Nicholas Shenker
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(4), 464; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11040464 - 06 Apr 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2004
Abstract
Background: Motor neglect occurs in patients with chronic pain conditions. Virtual environments (VE) help rehabilitation through biofeedback and improving motivation. Aim: To assess the feasibility of a VE for patients with motor neglect with chronic pain. Methods: 10 subjects with chronic pain (Fibromyalgia, [...] Read more.
Background: Motor neglect occurs in patients with chronic pain conditions. Virtual environments (VE) help rehabilitation through biofeedback and improving motivation. Aim: To assess the feasibility of a VE for patients with motor neglect with chronic pain. Methods: 10 subjects with chronic pain (Fibromyalgia, Sciatica, and Complex Regional Pain Syndrome) underwent a treadmill task three times per week for two weeks. Groups were randomized to receive real-time biofeedback from the VE (intervention) or shown still images (control). Primary outcomes were: (i) distance walked at baseline compared to the final 5 min cycle of week 2; (ii) the Lower Extremity Functional Index (LEFI) questionnaire. A satisfaction questionnaire was used. Follow up was to 24 weeks. Results: Total distance walked was significantly higher in the intervention group (p < 0.05), and 33% (2/6) of the intervention group had a clinically important LEFI improvement compared to 0/4 in the control group at week 2. No secondary outcome measures demonstrated any significant differences. The intervention received high satisfaction scores, significantly greater than the control group at week 24. No harms were recorded. Discussion: This feasibility study showed that VE and treadmill-walking improved walking distances and function for subjects with motor neglect. This is a promising novel approach and requires further validation through larger study. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neurorehabilitation of Sensory Disorders)
Show Figures

Figure 1

18 pages, 3674 KiB  
Article
Prediction of Acoustic Residual Inhibition of Tinnitus Using a Brain-Inspired Spiking Neural Network Model
by Philip J. Sanders, Zohreh G. Doborjeh, Maryam G. Doborjeh, Nikola K. Kasabov and Grant D. Searchfield
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(1), 52; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11010052 - 05 Jan 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 4266
Abstract
Auditory Residual Inhibition (ARI) is a temporary suppression of tinnitus that occurs in some people following the presentation of masking sounds. Differences in neural response to ARI stimuli may enable classification of tinnitus and a tailored approach to intervention in the future. In [...] Read more.
Auditory Residual Inhibition (ARI) is a temporary suppression of tinnitus that occurs in some people following the presentation of masking sounds. Differences in neural response to ARI stimuli may enable classification of tinnitus and a tailored approach to intervention in the future. In an exploratory study, we investigated the use of a brain-inspired artificial neural network to examine the effects of ARI on electroencephalographic function, as well as the predictive ability of the model. Ten tinnitus patients underwent two auditory stimulation conditions (constant and amplitude modulated broadband noise) at two time points and were then characterised as responders or non-responders, based on whether they experienced ARI or not. Using a spiking neural network model, we evaluated concurrent neural patterns generated across space and time from features of electroencephalographic data, capturing the neural dynamic changes before and after stimulation. Results indicated that the model may be used to predict the effect of auditory stimulation on tinnitus on an individual basis. This approach may aid in the development of predictive models for treatment selection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neurorehabilitation of Sensory Disorders)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research

23 pages, 2881 KiB  
Systematic Review
Impact of Sensory Deficits on Upper Limb Motor Performance in Individuals with Cerebral Palsy: A Systematic Review
by Isabelle Poitras, Ophélie Martinie, Maxime T. Robert, Alexandre Campeau-Lecours and Catherine Mercier
Brain Sci. 2021, 11(6), 744; https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci11060744 - 03 Jun 2021
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 3327
Abstract
People living with cerebral palsy (CP) exhibit motor and sensory impairments that affect unimanual and bimanual functions. The importance of sensory functions for motor control is well known, but the association between motor and sensory functions remains unclear in people living with CP. [...] Read more.
People living with cerebral palsy (CP) exhibit motor and sensory impairments that affect unimanual and bimanual functions. The importance of sensory functions for motor control is well known, but the association between motor and sensory functions remains unclear in people living with CP. The objective of this systematic review was to characterize the relationship between sensory deficits and upper limb motor function in individuals living with CP. Methods: Five databases were screened. The inclusion criteria were: (1) including people living with CP, (2) reporting measurements of upper limb motor and sensory functions. A qualitative analysis of the studies’ level of evidence was done. Results: Thirty-three articles were included. Twenty-five articles evaluated tactile functions, 10 proprioceptive functions and 7 visual functions; 31 of the articles reported on unimanual functions and 17 of them reported on bimanual functions. Tactile functions showed a moderate to high association; it was not possible to reach definitive conclusions for proprioceptive and visual functions. Conclusions: The heterogeneity of the results limits the ability to draw definitive conclusions. Further studies should aim to perform more comprehensive assessments of motor and sensory functions, to determine the relative contribution of various sensory modalities to simple and more complex motor functions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Neurorehabilitation of Sensory Disorders)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop