Special Issue "In Vivo Physiological Monitoring"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Sijung Hu
Website
Guest Editor
Wolfson School of Mechanical, Manufacturing and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University, LE11 3TU, UK
Interests: Tissue Optics; Sensing for Physiological Monitoring and Assessment; Signal/imaging Processing; Microfluidics based Lab-on-a chip and MEMS for in vitro Diagnosis POCT Non-contact and Wearable optoelectronic sensor for in vivo; Optoelectronic Systems for health screening, monitoring, diagnosis and assessment; Health Technology Innovation
Prof. Dr. Steve Greenwald
Website
Guest Editor
Professor of Cardiovascular Mechanics Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry Queen Mary University of London, Room 217, 80 Newark Street, London E1 2ES, UK
Interests: Mechanical factors in the pathogenesis of arterial disease. The development of non-invasive methods for measuring arterial pulse wave velocity, assessing endothelial function and, acoustic and optical detection of disturbed flow associated with arterial stenosis

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In vivo physiologic monitoring is used to monitor vital physiological parameters for clinicians, healthcare professionals, and even personal users, to be informed of changes in pathophysiological state. Additionally, in vivo physiological monitoring is important for many medical and biomedical applications related to mobile health (mHealth). One of the crucial challenges in this type of application is the interactions of sensors with sophisticated electronics, effective executive software, the human body, and associated effective circuits to deliver multi-functionalities and high performance in vivo physiological monitoring, even in a real-time. With the advances in mHealth, we need to develop robust and reliable physiologic monitoring technologies that can provide an earlier indication of pathophysiological alterations, which could prompt earlier, targeted and personalized healthcare. Biosensors is an international, peer-reviewed, open access journal that focuses on basic science and technological innovations that support the development of biosensors. This Special Issue on “In Vivo Physiological Monitoring” will focus on publishing original research, reviews and perspectives on measurements with biosensors to reveal human physiological variations from routine to physical activities.

Dr. Sijung Hu
Prof. Dr. Steve Greenwald
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Perfusion Changes at the Forehead Measured by Photoplethysmography during a Head-Down Tilt Protocol
Biosensors 2019, 9(2), 71; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9020071 - 27 May 2019
Abstract
Photoplethysmography (PPG) signals from the forehead can be used in pulse oximetry as they are less affected by vasoconstriction compared to fingers. However, the increase in venous blood caused by the positioning of the patient can deteriorate the signals and cause erroneous estimations [...] Read more.
Photoplethysmography (PPG) signals from the forehead can be used in pulse oximetry as they are less affected by vasoconstriction compared to fingers. However, the increase in venous blood caused by the positioning of the patient can deteriorate the signals and cause erroneous estimations of the arterial oxygen saturation. To date, there is no method to measure this venous presence under the PPG sensor. This study investigates the feasibility of using PPG signals from the forehead in an effort to estimate relative changes in haemoglobin concentrations that could reveal these posture-induced changes. Two identical reflectance PPG sensors were placed on two different positions on the forehead (above the eyebrow and on top of a large vein) in 16 healthy volunteers during a head-down tilt protocol. Relative changes in oxygenated ( Δ HbO 2 ), reduced ( Δ HHb) and total ( Δ tHb) haemoglobin were estimated from the PPG signals and the trends were compared with reference Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS) measurements. Also, the signals from the two PPG sensors were analysed in order to reveal any difference due to the positioning of the sensor. Δ HbO 2 , Δ HHb and Δ tHb estimated from the forehead PPGs trended well with the same parameters from the reference NIRS. However, placing the sensor over a large vasculature reduces trending against NIRS, introduces biases as well as increases the variability of the changes in Δ HHb. Forehead PPG signals can be used to measure perfusion changes to reveal venous pooling induced by the positioning of the subject. Placing the sensor above the eyebrow and away from large vasculature avoids biases and large variability in the measurements. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue In Vivo Physiological Monitoring)
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Open AccessArticle
Research on Non-Contact Monitoring System for Human Physiological Signal and Body Movement
Biosensors 2019, 9(2), 58; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9020058 - 19 Apr 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
With the rapid increase in the development of miniaturized sensors and embedded devices for vital signs monitoring, personal physiological signal monitoring devices are becoming popular. However, physiological monitoring devices which are worn on the body normally affect the daily activities of people. This [...] Read more.
With the rapid increase in the development of miniaturized sensors and embedded devices for vital signs monitoring, personal physiological signal monitoring devices are becoming popular. However, physiological monitoring devices which are worn on the body normally affect the daily activities of people. This problem can be avoided by using a non-contact measuring device like the Doppler radar system, which is more convenient, is private compared to video monitoring, infrared monitoring and other non-contact methods. Additionally real-time physiological monitoring with the Doppler radar system can also obtain signal changes caused by motion changes. As a result, the Doppler radar system not only obtains the information of respiratory and cardiac signals, but also obtains information about body movement. The relevant RF technology could eliminate some interference from body motion with a small amplitude. However, the motion recognition method can also be used to classify related body motion signals. In this paper, a vital sign and body movement monitoring system worked at 2.4 GHz was proposed. It can measure various physiological signs of the human body in a non-contact manner. The accuracy of the non-contact physiological signal monitoring system was analyzed. First, the working distance of the system was tested. Then, the algorithm of mining collective motion signal was classified, and the accuracy was 88%, which could be further improved in the system. In addition, the mean absolute error values of heart rate and respiratory rate were 0.8 beats/min and 3.5 beats/min, respectively, and the reliability of the system was verified by comparing the respiratory waveforms with the contact equipment at different distances. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue In Vivo Physiological Monitoring)
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Open AccessArticle
Comparative Design Study for Power Reduction in Organic Optoelectronic Pulse Meter Sensor
Biosensors 2019, 9(2), 48; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9020048 - 29 Mar 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
This paper demonstrated a new design structure for minimizing the power consumption of a pulse meter. Monolithic devices composed of a red (625 nm) organic light-emitting diode (OLED) and an organic photodiode (OPD) were fabricated on the same substrate. Two organic devices were [...] Read more.
This paper demonstrated a new design structure for minimizing the power consumption of a pulse meter. Monolithic devices composed of a red (625 nm) organic light-emitting diode (OLED) and an organic photodiode (OPD) were fabricated on the same substrate. Two organic devices were designed differently. One had a circle-shaped OLED in the center of the device and was surrounded by the OPD, while the other had the opposite structure. The external quantum efficiency (EQE) of the OLED and the OPD were 7% and 37%, respectively. We evaluated and compared the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the photoplethysmogram (PPG) signal on different parts of the body and successfully acquired clear PPG signals at those positions, where the best signal was obtained from the fingertip at a SNR of about 62 dB. The proposed organic pulse meter sensor was operated successfully with a power consumption of 0.1 mW. Eventually, the proposed organic biosensor reduced the power consumption and improved the capability of the pulse meter for long-term use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue In Vivo Physiological Monitoring)
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Open AccessArticle
A Novel Wearable Device for Continuous Ambulatory ECG Recording: Proof of Concept and Assessment of Signal Quality
Biosensors 2019, 9(1), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9010017 - 21 Jan 2019
Cited by 6
Abstract
Diagnosis of arrhythmic disorders is challenging because of their short-lasting, intermittent character. Conventional technologies of noninvasive ambulatory rhythm monitoring are limited by modest sensitivity. We present a novel form of wearable electrocardiogram (ECG) sensors providing an alternative tool for long-term rhythm monitoring with [...] Read more.
Diagnosis of arrhythmic disorders is challenging because of their short-lasting, intermittent character. Conventional technologies of noninvasive ambulatory rhythm monitoring are limited by modest sensitivity. We present a novel form of wearable electrocardiogram (ECG) sensors providing an alternative tool for long-term rhythm monitoring with the potential of increased sensitivity to detect intermittent or subclinical arrhythmia. The objective was to assess the signal quality and R-R coverage of a wearable ECG sensor system compared to a standard 3-lead Holter. In this phase-1 trial, healthy individuals underwent 24-h simultaneous rhythm monitoring using the OMsignal system together with a 3-lead Holter recording. The OMsignal system consists of a garment (bra or shirt) with integrated sensors recording a single-lead ECG and an acquisition module for data storage and processing. Head-to-head signal quality was assessed regarding adequate P-QRS-T distinction and was performed by three electrophysiologists blinded to the recording technology. The accuracy of signal coverage was assessed using Bland-Altman analysis. Fifteen individuals underwent simultaneous 24-h recording. Signal quality and accuracy of the OMgaments was equivalent to Holter-monitoring (84% vs. 93% electrophysiologists rating, p = 0.06). Signal coverage of R-R intervals showed a very close overlay between the OMsignal system and Holter signals, mean difference in heart rate of 2 ± 5 bpm. The noise level of OMgarments was comparable to Holter recording. OMgarments provide high signal quality for adequate rhythm analysis, representing a promising novel technology for long-term non-invasive ECG monitoring. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue In Vivo Physiological Monitoring)
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